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Old Jul 24, 2003, 9:40 PM   #1
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Default Close up lenses for FZ1 - how to use?

I got a set of three Vivitar close up lenses (#1, #2 and #3) but I'm confused how to properly use them. My new FZ1 is the first camera I've had that took add-on lenses!

If I want to use all three at once, which goes on the collar first? I've tried 1-2-3 and 3-2-1 and really can't tell the difference.

Should I leave the UV filter on or not?

Should I set the camera to Macro or to the "normal" setting (the red image of a camera on the dial)?

Any other tips would be greatly appreciated!
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Old Jul 25, 2003, 1:50 AM   #2
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Default Close ups

hi,

I take this picts with my fz1, and close-ups 1x+2x+4x ,
in macro mode with out uv.

http://pere.anibal.com/webmip/novetats/webmip.html
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Old Jul 25, 2003, 5:45 AM   #3
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Thanks for that pgrau. I suppose the close up lenses allowed you to get these close ups even though you had zoomed the lens out a bit.

Is the spider the biggest magnification? If the spider was not moving and you have a tripod, you could have done an experiment. You could have focussed using Macro mode then switched to Night Portrait mode (with the flash down) then taken your picture with the delayed action (to avoid vibration). This would have given you a smaller aperture so that perhaps more of the spider would be in focus front to back.

The slow shutter speed would probably mean you'd need a tripod and perhaps you don't want to be tied to that.

Looking forward to seeing more pictures.
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Old Jul 25, 2003, 9:51 AM   #4
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Sorry flakes, I missed the request for help (this post should get this back to the top of the pile )

I don't think the order the close-up lenses go on should make any difference. I guess you should generally use the least power and the least number of lenses you can get away with for your purposes.

I think I mentioned earlier that the bare camera lens allows you to take pictures of objects virtually touching the front lens element at maximum wide angle (35mm equivalent). This will probably give you the greatest magnification for small objects without any additional lenses, but of course this makes lighting the subject difficult!

By using a combination of the zoom facility on your lens and your close-up lenses, you should be able to take in- focus pictures which achieve the same or greater magnification from greater distances.

In your position, to get a feel for what the close up lenses help me achieve, I'd be tempted to do some tests which would allow me to complete at least part of a table like that below :

CU Lens dipotres | Camera Zoom | Min Focus Distance | Mag
0................................... 0x....................front of lens.........1
1....................................6x........... .............n cm..................
1....................................12x.......... .....................................
2....................................6x........... ......................................
.................................................. .........................................
6....................................12x.......... .....................................

You can probably interpolate results from a fairly small set of tests! Using something like the man's watch face I mentioned earlier you could arbritrarily name this filling the frame top to bottom as magnification x1.

Using macro mode gives you the closest focus, but oddly, having achieved that close focus you don't then lose focus if you switch to one of the other modes (assuming shutter button or continuous focus doesn't override it). As mentioned in the post above this could be useful if you want to increase depth of field with a smaller aperture. Also, the smaller aperture might help reduce any deterioration of image quality from the close-up lenses.

If you did produce some sort of table it could be quite a useful asset for others
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Old Jul 25, 2003, 3:01 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normjackson
Using macro mode gives you the closest focus, but oddly, having achieved that close focus you don't then lose focus if you switch to one of the other modes (assuming shutter button or continuous focus doesn't override it). As mentioned in the post above this could be useful if you want to increase depth of field with a smaller aperture. Also, the smaller aperture might help reduce any deterioration of image quality from the close-up lenses.
Cool, I never thought to try that.
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