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Old Jan 14, 2008, 5:37 PM   #1
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Paduang villages in Thailand are bizarre worlds created by Thai tour operators,

and the women receive no official support or legal endorsement from the Thai

government.

The women themselves take a pragmatic approach to their role in the local

tourist industry. Most accept their fate as showcases for the machinery of

tourism and quietly sit on their steps while a steady stream of tourists snap

photographs--an ethnic minority caught in a web of political intrigue,

powerlessness, and economic exploitation. Once the women reach their

twenties, the rings can never be removed because the neck muscles will not be

able to support their heads.



On the other hand they are refugees and better off, because of their elongated

necks, than tens of thousands of other people who have fled Burma where they

were persecuted and murdered. Each woman earns a relatively good monthly

income of 3,630 baht, about $110. That involves selling handicrafts and the

take from entrance fees, 250 baht ($7.50) for each tourist.


[align=left]


Paduang Making Yarn


Young Paduang Weaver


Paduang Boy with Dog
Paduang

Elder 2


Paduang Teenager


In the rear of one of these VV was a series of sheets stretched across my path.

I heard a familiar thwack sound and went to investigate.








[/align]
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Old Jan 15, 2008, 8:53 AM   #2
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Beautiful pictures of an unusual subject. I am glad this is not a custom that caught on here though.
Steve
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Old Jan 15, 2008, 4:40 PM   #3
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Have certainly enjoyed a vicarious visit to Thailand as seen through your observant eyes.
A really nice & interesting series -- particularly your last couple of posts.
Thanks for sharing.
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Old Jan 16, 2008, 1:45 PM   #4
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I've really enjoyed your pictures. I was wondering how you approached people to take portraits. They're stunning - sharply focused and the people seem relaxed.
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Old Jan 16, 2008, 4:47 PM   #5
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happy_peasant wrote:
Quote:
Beautiful pictures of an unusual subject. I am glad this is not a custom that caught on here though.
Steve
Thanks for viewing and commenting. I tried not to make freak show pictures and hope I succeeded. Neck rings did not take off in the states but the next part has a custom that has been around since the dawn of man and is practiced throughout the planet to this day.
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Old Jan 16, 2008, 4:49 PM   #6
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WindRowe wrote:
Quote:
Have certainly enjoyed a vicarious visit to Thailand as seen through your observant eyes.
A really nice & interesting series -- particularly your last couple of posts.
Thanks for sharing.
Moreover, thank you for viewing and commenting.
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Old Jan 16, 2008, 5:17 PM   #7
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zstringer wrote:
Quote:
I've really enjoyed your pictures. I was wondering how you approached people to take portraits. They're stunning - sharply focused and the people seem relaxed.
Yes asking people to take the pictures usually produces very stiff results. I use two techniques for people shots.



1- Use the zoom and sneak shots when they are not looking. This requires some preparation I put my camera in aperture priority mode, prepare everything for the shot by setting the F-stop to around F5, then focusing, and on some other subject that is approximately the same distance. Since the camera does not have to focus, manual focus, I direct the camera back to the real subject and take the shot quickly.

2- When I have gotten their permission, I use two approaches. A- I ask them to forget that I am there and not to look at me. B- After I have everything ready, I fake the shot, by making a clicking sound and raise my head above the camera keeping it in the same position. Then a half second later, I take the shot. That slight difference in time gets me a more relaxed subject.

In both one and two examples above, I give the subject a lot of personnel space between them and the camera using the zoom to grab portraits.



[align=center]I prefer #1.[/align]
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Old Jan 19, 2008, 10:02 AM   #8
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Excellent pictures. I haven't attempted 'people shots' much. Your photos encourage me to do so.
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