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Old Feb 4, 2008, 1:15 AM   #1
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Enough snow that I don't want to move the car so I have been walking around the local area. No birds by Lake Michigan due to sheet ice, at least until the wind shifts. So I took this picture down the street from my house.


And this one last week right before the new snow came.

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Old Feb 4, 2008, 6:43 AM   #2
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Great detail in the killer's chest. The white background makes the photo look a little overexposed and I also note purple fringing on the contours - was it high zoom?For this set,my caption would be "gory and goldy"!
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Old Feb 4, 2008, 8:44 AM   #3
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Raghu wrote:
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Great detail in the killer's chest. The white background makes the photo look a little overexposed and I also note purple fringing on the contours - was it high zoom?For this set,my caption would be "gory and goldy"!
Thanks for commenting Raghu. Photo is probably overlightened more then over exposed as it was a really gloomy day. Sky is actually darkened a wee bit from what it was right around bird. And yes, high zoom and a C-180 tele converter both used. And a wide Aperture and ISO 200. These hawks; they don't have the decency to catch prey when it is sunny.

Good title you thought of. I threw in the finch as an afterthought and wanted a title that would warn people, but gory would have done that also.
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Old Feb 4, 2008, 11:43 AM   #4
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I agree - overlightened, not overexposed. I am amazed at the clarity - the blood, the red eye, the feather details, everything.
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Old Feb 4, 2008, 1:54 PM   #5
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Raghu wrote:
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I agree - overlightened, not overexposed. I am amazed at the clarity - the blood, the red eye, the feather details, everything.
This is probably an artistic judgement call photo. I did it in quite a few degrees of lightness with Elements, and settled on this one as the one that showed what I wanted the best while still being a photo I could live with. I will be happy when I get a better shot of a Cooper's Hawk with lunch, but this is so much better then some prior ones I have shot that I am pleased.

I just did a search of my flickr photos. Of twelve shots of this species I have on flickr, only 3 had any kind of sunlight type conditions. That ratio will change, but not for the better, as I took a few shots of one this morning from my back sidewalk, and it was drizzling. Ah, winter.

Anyway, I took the one below a week or two ago. On yet another crummy day. This is a younger one.


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Old Feb 4, 2008, 5:12 PM   #6
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amazing picture! is it taken with the camera zoom (fz18 right?) or with a tele lens added on? what focus and metering did you use on this shot?
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Old Feb 4, 2008, 5:41 PM   #7
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doto41 wrote:
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amazing picture! is it taken with the camera zoom (fz18 right?) or with a tele lens added on? what focus and metering did you use on this shot?
Top picture taken with C-180 tele converter and full zoom. And cropped tight to bird. ISO 200. Shutter Priority and shutter speed 1/320 second. f/4.2. Shot prior to this was taken at same f stop and Aperture Priority and the camera selected 1/125 second, so this was quite a bit underexposed at the setting I used. On the other hand, I kept this one, the previous one I threw away as it was blurred. Too bad too as it was a good pose.

Second hawk picture full zoom but no converter. Aperture Priority; f/5.6, shutter selected by camera was 1/250 second. Intelligent ISO of 250.

Both these shots were shot RAW. And it is quite possible that both were shot at +1/3 Exposure Compensation as I like to use that when shooting a bird with either sky or water around it. Not that it would have made a difference on the first shot as Aperture was maxed out and I had selected ISO myself.
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Old Feb 4, 2008, 11:53 PM   #8
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do you use spot metering and spot focus on the bird itself. or multiple metering and area focus. Did you use a tripod or was it hand held? How far were you from the bird?
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Old Feb 5, 2008, 1:44 AM   #9
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doto41 wrote:
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do you use spot metering and spot focus on the bird itself. or multiple metering and area focus. Did you use a tripod or was it hand held? How far were you from the bird?
I pretty much always use spot metering and focusing for birds. Although I did not do so here, I usually set the dial to Manual for sitting subjects also. No tripod used, I leaned against a house for a bit of stability. I could not say for sure how close as branch was up there a ways and no way to measure. Twenty feet or a bit more maybe?

Speaking of tripods: see next post I make.
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