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Old Aug 13, 2009, 10:23 PM   #11
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Now now. Remember this is a help forum and there are all kinds of people at all kinds of skill levels.
One of the purposes is to help other people who might have questions & feel that they have issues.

And if you dont think that modern cameras could have issues, then you've just been lucky (or keeping a low photography profile or maybe just not looking closely).
I had to send my F717 in to have the CCD replaced under Sony's extended recall program. And Sony had a lot of models involved in that recall.
So did a bunch of other manufacturers have CCD issues:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/badccds.html

http://forums.dvdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=35915

http://wetpixel.com/i.php/full/recal...-sony-sensors/

It is not that uncommon for someone to get a camera that wont auto focus correctly or has bad color balance or defective pixels or noisy lens motor or defective switches, etc. you name it.

To be a good photographer, one also need to fully understand their camera. Its uniqueness, strengths & weaknesses & idiosyncronicities.

================
PS: It helps a lot to like your camera too.
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Old Aug 14, 2009, 5:02 AM   #12
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I wasn't saying that there are no faults with modern cameras, with the amount produced there has to be some. Out of the 20 or so digital cameras of various brands I have since they were introduced, first used was a Kodak with a picture size 640x480, I havent had any faults and those owned included several of the ones mention in the above links. Asking around friends only one has had a problem and that was a sensor pin in his Pentax dslr which broke proberbly due to incorrect attachment of the lens. Maybe here in the UK we are a bit luckier than others as we get most of the newly camera released severel months after the US and problems could be sorted by then.

Personally I would never buy a new camera when its first released and always wait to see if any fault manifest in the first few batches produced.

All I was saying was that most so called faults with cameras aren't they are either user error or a lack of understanding of how the camera works. First step is to read the manual a thing many people just dont do. Actual documented faults are an exception off course.

"sdromel" said

""" To be a good photographer, one also need to fully understand their camera. Its uniqueness, strengths & weaknesses & idiosyncronicities.

================
PS: It helps a lot to like your camera too. """

Well said, couldn't have put it better myself, which was the basis of what I meant above.
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Old Aug 14, 2009, 10:33 AM   #13
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Was I moaning? I'll have to watch that.
All this time I thought I was just satisfying my own curiosity about problems in the modern day manufacturing/QC chain -- and addressing some self-appointed experts' assertions that lens flaws are "rare" nowadays. You don't care, and that's fine for you. Others might.

As to actually using a camera, I have used my Z quite a bit in real world scenarios, such as... macros of pcb strata/structure (and SMD's), macros of insects for identification purposes, family gatherings, eBay listings, outdoor scenery, even 4th of July fireworks shows. That's a fairly broad range of usage. Those shots turned out quite well. It's hard to go wrong with these cameras on full auto, but I prefer to stick to PASM, mostly manual for macro shots. Btw, I read the entire manual before purchasing this camera.

My camera of choice from my film days was an old Canon FT QL. That thing weighed a ton and was built like a tank, but I enjoyed using it. My 55mm f1:1.2 lens contains a number of bubbles and the pics were quite good -- amazing nighttime shots with that rig. I believe I mentioned that "many people consider bubbles a sign of high quality of manufacture in older lenses". I could go on at length as to why that was so and what's changed in manufacturing since those days, but that info is beyond the scope of this forum and is readily available for interested parties (yes, I know you're not one of them).

I'm glad you found 60 years worth of camera use satisfying. I'm not sure how that invalidates my study, however, nor how it relegates me to the status of moaner.

I had some time to kill. Some people smoke dope, go on drinking binges and engage in other sundry and equally questionable activities in their spare time. I made a decision to actually go out and do something productive with my time, taking a few days to gather some informative data, even if it only served to satisfy my own trivial curiosity. I fail to comprehend your indignation at my having done so, and your reasoning that this somehow makes me an incompetent, inexperienced photographer and a moaner.

Last edited by Lazy Lens; Aug 14, 2009 at 10:35 AM.
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Old Aug 14, 2009, 11:11 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdromel View Post
Checked my FZ7 lens for flaws & some of the Pany cameras on Demo at Fry's & there were no discernable bubbles in any of the lenses. It is disturbing though that you encountered two units each with such artifacts. Let's hope that this is not the beginning of a new trend.
I used a 7x loupe and 1x reader glasses for the field inspections, and an Optivisor 5x + 2.5x for home inspection. Unless one's eyesight is perfect, s/he likely will miss most of the smaller bubbles with the naked eye. Some larger bubbles were readily apparent with my 1x readers on.

On average, it took me about 10-15 minutes per unit to both locate anomalies and rule out false positives. You do have to spend some time with the lens or you'll likely miss some, as it must be viewed with light hitting it from many different angles -- indeed, some bubbles (mostly the deeper ones) remained well hidden until I brought the lens to a very specific angle; move a degree or two off angle and it's invisible again -- this was with available lighting; it's much easier to locate the deeper ones on my bench in a controlled environment.

In-store lighting (especially overhead floods) and dirty lenses make this type of physical examination more difficult to perform, but once a bubble is spotted, there's no denying it; it sticks out like a sore thumb.
One of the worst examples was a Canon SX10 at a BestBuy. Its bubble at the objective front nodal plane (later verified) was so prominent that I could see it from a couple feet away before I ever touched the camera, as the overheads were hitting it just right.

Btw, I only inspected zoomers and dSLR lenses as I was only interested in the larger lenses...
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Old Aug 14, 2009, 5:46 PM   #15
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"Lazy Lens" if I have offended you in any way then I am sorry that wasn't what I mean't or intended to do. I also didn't intend to invalidate any of the research you have done. Its good to see someone actually taking time to do research, read manuals and find out about the item they are interested in and how they work.

I alway download and print out manuals for any item I want before I buy it to make sure I know how it works and if it will do what I need it to do. I also always buy over the internet and spend the first couple day thoroughly testing it. Here in the UK we have only 7 days (distant sellling regulations) to return an item if purchased over the internet and we find the item not suitable and cannot return an item purchased from a shop unless faulty or the shop accepts returns which most don't.

I do have my doubts about the Quality Control side of modern manufacturing methods as I have several faulty items in the audio/visual equipment I have bought recently. This is proberbly the same with digital camera/lens manufacturing but as I said earlier I must have been lucky as I have had no problems myself.
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Old Aug 20, 2009, 3:53 PM   #16
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Pardon my delayed response. I wasn't offended so much as perplexed. It was a simple misunderstanding and I appreciate your expression of contrition.
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