Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 25, 2003, 6:37 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 3
Default Wideangle on an Ultrazoom

Hi there

I am new to this forum but have been reading avidly in my search for my ideal camera. My choices at this point are the Panasonic FZ10, Olympus C-750 or Kodac DX6490 (in that order and if I can wait till the FZ10 is released here in New Zealand)

What is not discussed here a lot is the wide angle capabilities of these types of camera's for indoor or landscape photography.

FZ10 - 35mm
C-750 - 38mm
DX6490 - 38mm

I assume the difference in zoom is not linear and the additional 3 or even 1 mm of wide angle can make a big difference? I know some camera's have the panoramic function but that is not the ideal.

Would love to hear thoughts and opinions. If shooting in a room, what degree of wide angle would give you more than 90 deg of wide angle?
Nowakiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Nov 26, 2003, 12:13 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
sjms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,735
Default

you covered it fairly well. the basic issue here is people like to hear 10x zoom and go wow i can go out 350mm and forget that thay may want to shoot wide in a room or a landscape as you said. i own a A1 and that puts me into reasonable WA reference. after that i go to my 1Ds for additional WA. to see the difference go to this site. this gentleman put together a outstanding piece of software that shows the visual differences of the different focal lengths:

http://www.sweeting.org/mark/lenses/

the difference between a 28 and a 38 is fairly large.
sjms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2003, 6:46 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 37
Default Re: Wideangle on an Ultrazoom

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nowakiwi
Hi there

I am new to this forum but have been reading avidly in my search for my ideal camera. My choices at this point are the Panasonic FZ10, Olympus C-750 or Kodac DX6490 (in that order and if I can wait till the FZ10 is released here in New Zealand)

What is not discussed here a lot is the wide angle capabilities of these types of camera's for indoor or landscape photography.

FZ10 - 35mm
C-750 - 38mm
DX6490 - 38mm

I assume the difference in zoom is not linear and the additional 3 or even 1 mm of wide angle can make a big difference? I know some camera's have the panoramic function but that is not the ideal.

Would love to hear thoughts and opinions. If shooting in a room, what degree of wide angle would give you more than 90 deg of wide angle?
All the cameras in your list have a very moderate wideangle with a degree of about 60. The difference between 35 and 38 is small and 35 is not enought to shot in a small room.
For shoting indoor, in a home room, it s better a 28 equivalent, with a degree of about 75, available only, between compacta cameras with a EVF, in Minolta A1 or Sony F828.
If you want a 90 degree you will need a 21 equivalent lens, available only with a DSRL.
Remenber hwever when you are evaluating a camera that a short wideangle is more useful than a long tele in normal photo situations.
FrancescoC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2003, 8:13 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
sjms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,735
Default

there is also the nikon 5400 too w/o evf
sjms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 26, 2003, 8:35 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 37
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjms
there is also the nikon 5400 too w/o evf
Yes, of course. There is also the Olympus C5060 with a 27 equivalent, but I considered only Minolta and Sony because Olympus and Nikon are only 4x zoom and do not have the EVF.
FrancescoC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 27, 2003, 10:33 PM   #6
lg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 823
Default

Something to consider also is the quality of the wide angle view you are able to achieve. You'll probably want a wide angle adapter for any of the above cameras you choose, but vignetting, parallax disctortion, and a lack of sharpness are problems you will encounter with WA adapters. The lower the number, the more severe the problems. I'd recommend sticking to a .7 to .8x teleconverter. I use a WCON-08E on my camera, and I am very satisfied with this 30mm view on my camera. If the .7x converter made by Olympus is as good and was available when I made my purchase, I probably would have bought it.
lg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 28, 2003, 2:33 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 579
Default Re: Wideangle on an Ultrazoom

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrancescoC
If you want a 90 degree you will need a 21 equivalent lens, available only with a DSRL.
The 21mm requirement would cost $$$$$. For a full-frame DSLR, the body is already expensive. For a APS size DSLR, to yield 21mm, one needs a 14mm, which is also expensive. If some compromise can be made, the Sigma 15-30 would become 22.5-45 on a Nikon and 24-48 on a Canon. However, if image quality is not so significant, the discontinued Nikon Coolpix 5000 plus Nikon wide angle WC-E68 can be as wide as 19mm, which is the widest consumer level digicam setup ever made. Note that this 5000 plus WC-E68 is NOT a semi-fisheye lens. Although it does have some barrel distortion, the WC-E68 is an excellent lens. Used Coolpix 5000 and WC-E68 are available with reasonable prices on eBay.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 User Guide
shene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 28, 2003, 4:19 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 96
Default Stitching frames for a Panoramic result

I've had excellent results with stitched panoramas: several overlapping frames blended together with COOL 360 or PhotoShop Elements. The resolution is much greater than a single-frame wide-angle can provide, the "angle" can be up to 360 degrees if appropriate, and the software usually does an excellent job of blending the frames. I know this isn't a traditional photographer's approach to wide-angle photography, but it works well and costs much less than wide-angle lenses.
Charlie Howard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 28, 2003, 4:47 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 37
Default Re: Stitching frames for a Panoramic result

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie Howard
I've had excellent results with stitched panoramas: several overlapping frames blended together with COOL 360 or PhotoShop Elements. The resolution is much greater than a single-frame wide-angle can provide, the "angle" can be up to 360 degrees if appropriate, and the software usually does an excellent job of blending the frames. I know this isn't a traditional photographer's approach to wide-angle photography, but it works well and costs much less than wide-angle lenses.
Charlie,
yor technique is very good for panoramas, but if you want to shot between people or in a small room you will need a wideangle. The choose depends on your needs.
FrancescoC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 29, 2003, 4:25 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 253
Default Re: Stitching frames for a Panoramic result

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrancescoC
Charlie,
yor technique is very good for panoramas, but if you want to shot between people or in a small room you will need a wideangle. The choose depends on your needs.
Panoramas with people usually won't work (unless they're dead, asleep, or very patiently still, but it will work in small room. Just buy a cheap tripod ball swivel adapter that will allow you turn the camera on its side for a portrait shot and then take more pictures to ensure proper overlap. I've taken numerous panoramas of small-ish rooms for virtual real estate tours, and that method will work in just about any room bigger than a closet.

I disagree about a wide angle being more important than a zoom. If there's a single reason why anyone is currently reading the Panasonic forum(s), it's because of the 12x optical zoom on the FZ1, 2, and 10. 35mm is a respectable wideangle for just about any consumer camera, and just about anything less than that is pretty much considered a "specialty" camera. I've never, ever had an issue where I couldn't fit even the largest group of people in a shot because of wide angle limitations of any of my cameras. If you think about it, the more people who are in a room, the more likely the room is big anyway so all you'd have to do is back up to fit everyone in. Unless you just like to take pictures of large groups of people in small rooms, you're probably going to find yourself zooming in more than out.
EffZeeOne is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:30 PM.