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Old Mar 8, 2010, 9:31 PM   #11
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Can you put on the lens cap if the filter is on? (sorry for the noob question)
If so, is it necessary to have the lens cap if the filter is used for protection? Lens caps tend to get annoying and ugly.
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Old Mar 8, 2010, 9:36 PM   #12
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Greg-

The filter on the FZ-18 might work on the FZ-35, give it a try.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 8, 2010, 9:37 PM   #13
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jjp-

Yes, the lens cap will work on the filter. Mine does.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 8, 2010, 10:12 PM   #14
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Thank you Sarah, I shall give that a go.
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Old Mar 18, 2010, 5:15 PM   #15
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Not to be dense, but given all of the varying prices even within brands, can anyone make a recommendations as to a decent UV filter to use as protection for the FZ35 -- or at least which specific lens you use? Just looking at the Hoya filters, for example, there seem to be several.

If you have suggestions for a polarizer and/or an ND filter also, that would be a bonus .

Thanks.
--Larry
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Old Mar 30, 2010, 9:11 PM   #16
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I'm a beginner but will give some thought here. The Hoya UV $20 filter on ebay seems be be doing well for me to protect the lens especially.

A nice Hoya multicoated circular polarizer may be good to help with unwanted reflections in some instances and to photograph like tadpoles or fish through clear water.

A neutral density filter may be good for photography on a sunny day when you want to have a slow shutter speed and can't adjust the f-stop enough to prevent over exposure. You have to know what stops you desire and that's only through trial and error for a amateur photographer.

The Tcon-17 teleconverter seems to work well also but is hard to get.
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Old Mar 30, 2010, 10:02 PM   #17
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It's about light transmission through any Filter

The B+W MRC Filters (MRC = Multi Resistant Coated) will allow 99% of the usable light through the filter while controlling flares/ghosting etc...check out their lower grade I think MC (For standard Multi Coat?) it cuts light transmission by 3-5% through the Filter as does most of the cheap ones and some by 8%!...if a Camera can't see it can't take great pic's and that degrades IQ...

http://www.schneideroptics.com/info/...dbook_Full.pdf

Hoya Filters:
"HMC filters are multi coated. Average light transmission is over 97%
The multi coating helps reduce flare and ghosting.
These popular camera filters are renowned for their ability to minimize reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting. The result is an average light transmission of over 97%, giving sharp contrast and well balanced color. HOYA HMC filters are recommended for enhancing the performance of today's multicoated lenses."

Bottom Line is if a Filter cuts light transmission it can degrade quality...there are certain shots that require filters and greatly help "that" shot...but on the average you will have a degraded picture is my thoughts albeit very minimal with filters like B+W that allow 99% light transmission...but they are $70 to $200 also...
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Old Mar 30, 2010, 10:09 PM   #18
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Well there are other things to consider about multicoated filter if you do use them. They are a pain in the side to clean when in the field, if you smear them, a micro fiber close will not help you. As you really need to be careful of not scratching up the coating and making thing worth. The only multicoated that is as easy to clean is a tiffen ht series. But they are high dollar items.

If you want to protect your lenses. Get a good glass lens, and when your are not shooting in hostile environment, remove it before shooting before shooting toward a strong light source to prevent ghosting and flares.
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Old Mar 30, 2010, 10:16 PM   #19
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Here is a link to some filter comparisons.

http://www.bobatkins.com/photography...l/filters.html
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Old Mar 30, 2010, 10:32 PM   #20
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I noticed some of the Pros don't even put the Filter on their lens for a certain shot they just hold it in front of the lens and get the shot then back in the bag it goes...
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