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Old Mar 9, 2010, 8:30 PM   #1
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Default Taken after a very hot day @ Sunset

After a very hot day in Cape Town on Sunday we had the most beautiful red sunset. I couldn't resist and as always have my FZ35 on hand.
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Old Mar 9, 2010, 10:38 PM   #2
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Awesome stuff Paul!

When I saw the second to last photo I was reminded of a phenomenon mentioned by Ken Rockwell called the "Green Flash". Apparently it is extremely rare and difficult to get. Maybe next time you do the sunset you can give it a try (there's no suitable location near me, as the sun sets in the west here, and you really need to be able to see it going down over the ocean for a chance.)

Here's the link, it's about 1/2 way down the page:

http://www.kenrockwell.com/2005maui/maui-photo-tips.htm

And a link to some images on google:

http://images.google.com.au/images?r...gbv=2&aq=f&oq=

Last edited by chillgreg; Mar 28, 2010 at 2:15 PM.
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Old Mar 10, 2010, 10:45 AM   #3
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Sunset tips-

(1) Please do not attempt shooting directly into the sun when it is still 15 degrees or more above the horizon, as you rish damaging the light meter in your camera that sets auto exposure.

(2) Sunset photos seem to be most effective when they show the sun just marginally above, at, or slightly below the visual horizon.

(3) Catching the green light, or green flash is very difficult, as it only occurs momentarily. It took me over 55years to capture my first photo of it.

(4) Working the visual foreground into a sunset photo increases its visual appeal.

Attached is a recent sunset example.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 10, 2010, 10:54 AM   #4
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Here is an image I use in my classes, showing that you must wait for the sun to get low in the sky, it is called Sunset Photographer.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 10, 2010, 10:56 AM   #5
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Finally, here is a sunset landscape taken in Hawaii, which is famous for its sunsets.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 10, 2010, 11:43 AM   #6
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Those are really beautiful shots Sarah!
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Old Mar 10, 2010, 1:21 PM   #7
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Wow.....Postcard Stuff!!!!
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Old Mar 10, 2010, 3:19 PM   #8
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Indeed post card, that's what post cards are made of, pure beauty. Sarah your sunset shot's are awesome.
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Old Mar 11, 2010, 5:07 AM   #9
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Sarah, I've seen a number of your "sundowner" pics over the last few days, and I keep wondering, especially over the last two shown in this thread, whether those colour tones can still be described as natural. No offense - I mean, those are really beautiful shots, and the composition is excellent in both cases - but do they really reflect what you saw there, live? The reds seem over-cooked (a term borrowed from a DP Review test of my old Finepix S5100 when shooting at high ISO), the blues seem almost antarctic. And obviously, inbetween the two, you get a vivid purple. So where is the green? Is this the doing of the automatic sunset scene on the Panasonic?

Really, no offense intended, it's just "too intense" for my liking, so I'd like to be warned ahead of time, if this is the white balance that the sunset scene produces.

(Paul, those first few shots look like they could have been taken from Goodwood/Parow/Bellville - or am I mistaken?)

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Mark
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Last edited by Mark R.; Mar 11, 2010 at 5:10 AM. Reason: Explaining where I got the term "over-cooked"
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Old Mar 11, 2010, 5:37 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Here is an image I use in my classes, showing that you must wait for the sun to get low in the sky, it is called Sunset Photographer.

Sarah Joyce
This is Satire23's photo I believe so probably they should get the praise and recognition
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