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Old Mar 21, 2010, 3:41 PM   #21
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For indoor I have saved my settings into one of the Custom modes. Basically I have flash set to force.....
Tullio, thanks for that tip - Today I created a similar indoor flash setting for my C1 too.
Indeed the Auto Flash is unpredictable and annoying at times.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 10:02 AM   #22
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You are so right, Tullio. I think the "features" make this camera more fun than anything I remember. I've grown to appreciate the new video programs that shoot the video in whatever mode your dial is in. The custom video is also special.

So far, I am very, very impressed with the image stabilization. It borders on amazing.

Jack
I have been playing around with my FZ35 more and I have to agree the "features" are great and can be lots of fun, but they can be really overwhelming too. I sometimes get the feeling that no matter how many options I try I will never get through them all. Even if I do, I'm not sure there is enough time to compare all of the various possibilities to determine what is "best" for a particular situation.

I don't want to miss potentially great shots messing around with all of the features, but leaving the camera on program mode all the time also seems like it would be a waste.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 11:20 AM   #23
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Jazzer251, I spent a huge amount of time experimenting and trying to find optimal settings, until I realised that if the subject matter I was filming was even slightly modified, I was back to square one. Everyone will have a different idea of what type of image they are looking for, soft or sharp etc. so I realise that there is no optimal or ideal setting. Each to their own I suppose.

But, I no longer even bother with a number of options. i.e. I never change the NR setting anymore. I leave my ISO setting permanently at 200, and far prefer to manually adjust (I keep all ISO intelligence settings switched off - If I forget to adjust the ISO, I will never get a value higher than 200 which I want to avoid like the plague). I always leave both the Saturation and Sharpness at +1 (my personal preference) and use the P mode for +90% of all my images.
There are only about two other scene modes that I use, of which “Sunset” is the most useful. The M mode also has its advantages at times (specifically when I need to do a long exposure). Only recently have I started using the preset C1 setting, but only for force flash indoors shots. There is also one change that I highly recommend using on the FZ38/35: Spot Focus - I can’t recall when I last needed to revert back to the factory default.

As for Face Recognition, I have been disappointed, and think it can be quite annoying and inaccurate at times. I stopped using it completely after only a week.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 12:56 PM   #24
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...
I don't want to miss potentially great shots messing around with all of the features, but leaving the camera on program mode all the time also seems like it would be a waste.
Yes and yes. The trick is to play with the camera settings not when you are supposed to take serious pictures but when you are at home and have nothing to do. Then you pick a variety of subjects under different conditions (i.e. indoor, outdoor, sunlit, shade, high contrast/low contrast, etc, etc, etc.) and play with the settings that are directly related to them. For instance, say you want to determine how well the camera handle White Balance (auto and preset settings). Find different light sources (tungsten vs. fluorescent vs. natural sun vs. shade) and shoot till your heart's content. Then upload the images and go through them. Pick the ones you like and check the EXIF data. It will tell you exactly what settings you used. Now you have a better idea of how to set your camera's WB depending on the light source. Do this exercise for other settings such as sharpness, contrast, saturation, noise reduction, etc. Yes, it may sound tedious but it's better than sitting in front of the TV watching a boring show. I can tell you that even after you master on your particular camera, you won't be making changes every single time you are about to take a shot. You'll find that there is a couple of settings that may cover 90% of the pictures you usually take. The other 10% cover those unique conditions you'll miss if you don't do something.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 1:02 PM   #25
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Jazzer251, I spent a huge amount of time experimenting and trying to find optimal settings, until I realised that if the subject matter I was filming was even slightly modified, I was back to square one. Everyone will have a different idea of what type of image they are looking for, soft or sharp etc. so I realise that there is no optimal or ideal setting. Each to their own I suppose. ...
Absolutely, you're right on. I've used the same words many times before. However, even though many times tastes will collide, there are other times when they will agree and I think that those are the times you want to find out what settings were used. Basically I'm saying..."I like this image and I want to be able to take pictures that will look just like it...so what settings were used?".
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 1:36 PM   #26
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dbnnet and Tullio, thanks for your thoughts. It's interesting, but sometimes I wonder if I didn't compare pictures side by side whether I would notice the difference between the settings at all. Often it is pretty subtle. Over time, I'm sure I'll get comfortable with what I feel works best for me -- and by then I'll probably be looking to "upgrade" and then I can start all over again .
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Old Mar 28, 2010, 9:49 AM   #27
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Default Burst Modes in SCN

Not sure why Pany filed the high speed burst modes in SCN but they are there and I find them VERY useful. In fact, discovering this mode steered me away from the Sony HX1 and it's 10fps 10mp burst. The 3mp bursts are actually more practical than the full rez bursts since they store to the card almost instantly.

The FZ35 offers two choices in high speed burst, image and speed. I find them both to be useful and have printed many kids' baseball shots from these 3mp bursts.

It's a fun mode, give it a try sometime.

Jack
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Old Mar 28, 2010, 11:30 AM   #28
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Hi Jack-

I agree, it strange to have the high speed burst and the flash burst in the Scene Modes. However, as you mentioned, they are useful.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 28, 2010, 1:27 PM   #29
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Thanks, Jack. I was fooling around with that a couple of days ago. I agree about both it's usefulness and oddness of its location, especially since you can access the standard burst mode with a button. Why not include the high speed burst as an option with that?
-Larry
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Old Mar 28, 2010, 1:33 PM   #30
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Thanks, Jack. I was fooling around with that a couple of days ago. I agree about both it's usefulness and oddness of its location, especially since you can access the standard burst mode with a button. Why not include the high speed burst as an option with that?
-Larry
Hi Larry,

At first I thought I'd use nothing but the speed mode since I could tell no difference in the quality between speed and image. I discovered at the Little League games that if I shot several batting sequences in speed, I had a real job sorting through them when I got home. I now mostly use image option since its less cumbersome and still very fast, 6fps I believe.

Jack
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