Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 23, 2010, 12:52 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 19
Default A question

I got to take a couple of test shots with the FZ35 today. It seems to me that greenery looks more "natural" with this camera than with my old S3.

Now for the question. It may be a stupid question, but keep in mind that I don't claim to be photographer. I've always just pointed, pressed the button, and hoped for the best, but I would like to learn just a little.

I took the two pics below this morning. In the second photo the sky is washed out. Is there any way to prevent this?



ChuckJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 23, 2010, 2:31 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

ChuckJ-

The sky is was out and looks white in color rather than blue, like the first photo simply due to overexposure. You need to reduce the amount of light entering your FZ-35's lens. The easiest way to do that is to use the Exposure Compensation feature.

Whenever, I am outdoors in bright sunshine I (1) use a lens shade to prevent lens flare and (2) I automatically crank in at least EV (Exposure Compensation) -0.3, just to prevent a bit of over exposure.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 23, 2010, 5:52 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 19
Default

Thanks
ChuckJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2010, 3:38 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: South Africa
Posts: 233
Default Exposure Compensation

I also keep my Exposure Compensation at -0.3 most of the time.
This is an example (unedited) of a shot I took earlier this week.
I only had a second or two to capture the photo (handheld & at full zoom).
Had the exposure compensation not been preset to -0.3 the sky
would have probably been washed out too.
Regards
Attached Images
 

Last edited by dbnnet; Apr 24, 2010 at 3:41 AM.
dbnnet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2010, 1:11 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1
Default Alternate technique

ChuckJ,

Along with the above suggestions, there is another way to prevent this kind of overexposure and that would be to use a different metering technique for the second photo.

The first photo shows a wide view with about half sky and half trees & lake. Your metering system read the whole scene, averaged the reading of the bright sky and darker trees & lake, and properly exposed the whole scene. The second photo is a closer view showing very little sky and is dominated by the darker trees & lake. In this case, the metering system read the predominately dark area with very little sky and exposed for it, thus overexposing the sky.

The other way to expose the second scene like the first would be to raise the camera to include the same amount of sky (about 1/2 of the photo) in the second scene as in the first, press the AF/AE lock button to lock that exposure, lower the camera to compose the photo, and click.

Rick

Last edited by Rick T; Apr 24, 2010 at 1:14 PM. Reason: typo
Rick T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2010, 2:14 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 19
Default

Thanks for the tips everyone. And rick, believe it or not just before reading this I was wondering what the AF/AE LOCK button was for. Thanks for the info.

I've finally gotten the manual printed so maybe I want have to bother you guys so much, but I do have to say that I am so impressed with the knowledge, friendliness and willingness to help that I've found here at Steve's.

It is appreciated.
ChuckJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2010, 3:27 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Ordo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: BsAs
Posts: 3,452
Default

I don't know why but i always need -1 exposure compensation (ZS3). Then, in pp i can figure out how to get better highs. But if you blow out highs there's no way out.
Ordo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2010, 4:11 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 19
Default

Another question. In two weeks I'll hopefully be on vacation so I'm trying to get educated. The two photos below are the types of photos that I like to take. One of these were with a Kodak. The other with a Canon.

With the first photo what settings on the 35 would be best in general for such a situation?

On the second photo would the SUNSET mode be sufficient?



ChuckJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2010, 4:12 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

ordo-

The rule of the road in photo editing is: that you can recover a slight under exposure, by hardly ever an over exposure!

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 24, 2010, 4:12 PM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 19
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ordo View Post
I don't know why but i always need -1 exposure compensation (ZS3). Then, in pp i can figure out how to get better highs. But if you blow out highs there's no way out.
So better results can be post-processed from under-exposure than over-exposure?
ChuckJ is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:56 PM.