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Old Jan 20, 2011, 6:17 PM   #11
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Just an addition for white balance That I use as a rule for myself.
When shooting JPG I don't use auto I choose for the picture setting because you can't correct the WB properly.
When shooting RAW I use auto as it can be changed in Photoshop when processing the raw file.
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Old Jan 20, 2011, 7:48 PM   #12
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My only pause for thought is that some of the "set-ups" are factually incorrect. That is what I believe caused the threads demise. If we are going to put a "sticky" on a thread, I think that these tips or "set-up's" have to be factually and photographically correct.

Tips like this are only a very rough guess, a "wag" as we used to call them in the U.S. Navy. These tips will probably not work in all photo situations because lighting does change.

It would be far more beneficial to really learn Photography and how aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and lighting must all work smoothly together to get consistently excellent images.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 1:08 AM   #13
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Which ones are factually incorrect?

I have used cheeseboys moon settings, and the result below:


moon by babasujaan, on Flickr

As for wildlife zoom, you can see below it works:


strange habits by babasujaan, on Flickr
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 4:36 AM   #14
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I think these are useful but hard to remember and as Sarah suggests, knowing the answer for a few situations isn't half as valuable as understanding the reasoning behind those answers so you can apply them to new situations as well.

For example, what is absolutely the first question you ask yourself when taking a photo? I'll make a suggestion and if anyone can suggest something more important that should precede it then we'll start with that. If not, what would you do next.

Question 1: Would I get a better picture if I stood somewhere else? (This includes considerations of where the light is coming from, which way the subject is facing, what's in the background/foreground, do I have time to move)
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 4:44 AM   #15
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Actually I thought of an earlier question:

1. Would I get a better picture at another time?
2. Would I get a better picture from somewhere else?
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 5:51 AM   #16
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Martin-

I very much like your approach to this puzzle:

1. Would I get a better picture at another time?


Answer: Yes, time of day equates quite nicely to the lighting of the proposed photure to environment. Photos taken earlier in the day, before noon, have much more interesting light photographically speaking. Those photos taken between 11:00am and 3:00 tend to exhibit rather flat lighting. The late afternoon period, from 3:00pm until dark, contains two great times to take photos. The hour just before sunset, is called the "Golden Hour" as it tends to have lighting with a golden or bronze quality to it. In my experience, the "Golden Hour" has produced some very interesting photos with rather dramatic lighting.

Finally there is the "Blue Hour." That is the 60minutes before darkness is fully developed. Some of my best night landscape photos have been taken during the "Blue Hour."

2. Would I get a better picture from somewhere else?


Answer: Yes, positioning yourself correctly to take the proposed photo can make a huge difference. When texture is needed in a photo create contrast, and to emphasize photo sharpness, changing your position to obtain cross lighting produces that much needed, measurable texture that can give your photo some wow factor.

The same is true for informal portraits taken out of doors. Positioning yourself so that the photo environment is in soft or dappled shade prevents your model from squinting, and smooths out facial textures producing a much more pleasing informal portrait.

Sarah Joyce

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Old Jan 21, 2011, 7:26 AM   #17
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Martin, very correct. But as a beginner, one always look for a set of "default" settings to use in order to help the confidence build.

For example, I had no clue abt saturation, ev, etc..but after reading here and checking exifs, I noted most settings were at a negative ev and positive saturation and tried the same. It helped my shots.

I think these settings are not cast in stone for sure, because conditions always are different. But they do help a beginner look at things we normally wouldn't, having come from p&s cameras.
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 7:57 AM   #18
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dropmyload - I think it's useful and that's what the custom settings are useful for - you can set it up for your 3 favourite situations and be ready to go - I just wish I could remember what I'd stored in the presets though. Would be really handy if you could set a name for them. However, I always seem to end up working it out from scratch every time.

3. Composition - now I'm in the right place at the right time, how should I frame the shot? rule of thirds? a low angle? a wide angle? etc. etc.

I quite like the idea that every shot should start with T.L.C. (Time, Location, Composition). It's a bit twee but easy to remember.
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 1:32 PM   #19
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dropmyload-

The other side of the coin is this: if you understand the principles of photography, you know enough to create your own solutions, and you do not have to depend upon a set of generalized, but not very exact settings.

Perhaps it is time for a sticky thread that is devoted to teaching more about photography and expanded information on how to get the most from the commonly used cameras of this Forum: the FZ35 and FZ40. What do you folks think about that idea??

And Dropmyload, addressing the question you raised: where are these generalizations incorrect? Just take a look at the very first entry in the thread:

"just thought the following maybe useful to help the many new FZ38 owners (including me) to get a short cut as to a decent starting point settings-wise for many common scenarios. ie/

Indoor toddler/children shot - Use shutter priority (S) setting & 1/160th speed / ISO max 100 / use flash & vary exposure to suit"

Every time the distance between the subject and the camera physically changes, the exposure changes.


Sarah Joyce


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Old Jan 21, 2011, 2:14 PM   #20
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Good idea Sarah !
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