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Old Aug 20, 2010, 7:24 AM   #41
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I always use a tripod when I want to take multiple photos of the same. But I still wonder which shutter speeds I should use, I'm really confused, but then again, it's a matter of taste I guess, but the site that gave the values I posted above, had a very nice shot.
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Old Aug 20, 2010, 8:56 PM   #42
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What are you confused about exactly?
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Old Aug 21, 2010, 4:21 AM   #43
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THanks for willing to help me. As my mother tongue is not English, it sometimes is difficult to understand me hehe.

I checked out a few sites about HDR, and they said it's rather important to have a certain F-stop. I understand that part, so we move on to the next. Also, they advice to either put the camera on A-mode or S-mode. So far, so good, they advice to use auto-bracketing, and that's no problem either.

And here it comes what confuses me. They say that the shutter speeds should have a certain algorithm in it. I forgot the source where I got this from, but for instance, they shoot the serie of photos like this:

#1 +- 0 EV 1/20
#2 -1 EV 1/40
#3 -2 EV 1/60
#4 +1 EV 1/10
#5 +2 EV 1/6

I don't understand how they made up those shutterspeeds like 1/20, 1/40 and so on, and I have the feeling it is rather important when you'd like to get better HDR photos.
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Old Aug 21, 2010, 11:52 AM   #44
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They did not make up those numbers. Exposure compensation increases or decreases the amount of light reaching the sensor (forced by the photographer). Now here's the most important thing to understand...changing the exposure is YOUR decision to add/reduce light, not the camera. So, as long as the camera has the following settings: Av mode (aperture priority), iE turned OFF and fixed ISO (no matter what value you have it set at), the shutter speed will either increase by a full stop if you decrease the exposure by -1 and vice-versa. The reason is because the camera wants to make sure it grants your wish to over or under expose the image by x amount. Now, if you have iE turned on or ISO set to auto or the camera in P mode, then these ratios won't be constant because the camera will make voluntary adjustments to those values as needed. It may increase the ISO once the shutter speed drops below a certain level or change the aperture, etc. If the iE is on, the camera may change the ISO value even if you have fixed it to a certain value, reason why you MUST turn iE OFF.

You can test it yourself. Make the necessary changes to the camera settings as I mentioned. Set the camera exposure to 0, point it to a bright spot and half press the shutter (no need to actually take the picture). Note the shutter speed value at the bottom of the LCD. Then decrease the exposure by -1, point the camera to that same exact spot (lighting must be identical between shots) and half-press the shutter. You'll see that if you started at 1/100 you now get 1/200. If on the other hand you increase the exposure by +1, then you'd see 1/50.

The reason the numbers you posted are not exactly double is because most likely the camera was not set as I indicated above. Therefore, the camera made some adjustments itself. That's exactly why if you want consistency, you must have Av, iE OFF and fixed ISO value.

Hope this clarifies things a bit.
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Last edited by Tullio; Aug 21, 2010 at 7:18 PM.
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Old Aug 21, 2010, 12:57 PM   #45
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It certainly did, Tullio, and want to say thanks to you
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Old Jul 8, 2012, 11:38 AM   #46
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The shot that you took of the moon is absolutely fantastic ! Almost hard to believe that it was taken with the Panasonic Lumix FZ35 and not some high dollar DSLR. I can't help but wonder if the shot would have been as sharp and had such great detail if your FZ35 had a CMOS sensor in it instead of it's CCD sensor. I think the CCD sensor has far superior still image quality as compared to the CMOS/BSI-CMOS type sensors. Thanks for sharing.
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