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Old May 11, 2010, 3:40 AM   #1
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Default FZ35 pics - autumn leaves

Hi there,

I haven't posted in a while, mostly because the weather in Pretoria has been awful during April, so the opportunities for great pictures were limited. Anyway, we now have beautiful sunshine, and this morning I thought I'd capture some autumn foliage on my way to work. It's a row of Liquid Ambers planted along a street that I travel each day, and in autumn they put on a splendid show of yellow, orange and dark red. Some have already lost their foliage ("When autumn leaves ... Begin to fall"), but I had to wait for a sunny day. Keep in mind that this was relatively early in the morning - in the 3rd and 5th shot I bumped up the Gamma using IrfanView, to get some details in the shady areas.

In the 5th shot I used telephoto to frame an interesting house, about 1 km away, between two Liquid Ambers, about 50 m away.

And yes, I'm beginning to enjoy the FZ35!

Regards,
Mark
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Old May 11, 2010, 1:12 PM   #2
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Mark,...I like your photos. Thanks for posting them.

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Old May 11, 2010, 1:28 PM   #3
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Mark-

All in all, a good series of photos. However, the first two are over exposed. A bit of Exposure Compensation could cure that.

Sarah Joyce
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Old May 12, 2010, 5:42 AM   #4
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Thanks for your comments.

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However, the first two are over exposed.
Really, Sarah Joyce? I thought that the 3rd and 5th were actually under-exposed... Could you elaborate on specific features that indicate over-exposure?

The wall was in the shade and there was a lot of glare in the morning air behind the trees. It was more bright-gray than blue. The first picture is almost directly under the sun. I battled to get at least some detail of the wall. I know, the wall is not the main feature of the pictures, but I wanted some detail, so I spot-focused slightly lower, then held the exposure and moved the camera up.

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Mark
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Old May 12, 2010, 6:32 AM   #5
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I believe what she is saying is that you just had to crank down the EV a notch or two for the first two pictures. But then you risk other parts being underexposed. I think there is more to it than just cranking down the EV and would welcome some more insight than just cranking down the EV as I wish it was that simple.

The sky is blown out in the first picture and whats a good way to get a better sky with out underexposing the rest of the picture ?
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Old May 12, 2010, 9:22 AM   #6
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But then you risk other parts being underexposed.
Exactly! This actually happened in the later shots, so I had to try and re-gain some low-light detail by bumping up the gamma.

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The sky is blown out in the first picture and whats a good way to get a better sky with out underexposing the rest of the picture ?
To my knowledge, you can only achieve that with HDR photography. And that's one avenue I don't want to go down, because to me, the results mostly look horribly unnatural.

In this case, I'd rather blow out the sky slightly, in order to catch sufficient detail on the wall as well as sufficient brightness on the tree's leaves. Come to think of it, the first picture actually reflects quite well what my eyes saw. While looking at the tree, the background sky was actually painfully bright.

[EDIT: I must add that the first pic was facing north-east, i.e. being in the southern hemisphere, that's directly under the morning sun's haze. The other shots are all facing south-west to north-west, which is why the sky is not so bright, and more blue.]
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Old May 12, 2010, 10:24 AM   #7
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I have my FZ38 permanently set at -0.3 (EV) for all outdoor shots. On the FZ38/35 I believe this is a must. From what I have read, many older model FZ users have experienced similar.
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Old May 12, 2010, 11:24 AM   #8
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Mark-

The exposure in #5 is spot on. Here is an example of the needed changes. This is #1 reworked in Photoshop Elements.

Sarah Joyce
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Old May 12, 2010, 1:48 PM   #9
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A good bit of what people are seeing depends on their monitor / monitor settings. Things can look different on Macs and PCs, too.
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Old May 12, 2010, 8:12 PM   #10
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I absolutely agree with Sarah's comment about (particularly) the first shot being over exposed. Sure you can see the wall real well but at the expense of the top half being way too bright. So bright that the sky has hardly any blue in it and there's lots of PF (and color bleeding) on the top half of the tree due the extreme high contrast. This image would be a typical example of overdone HDR processing. I personally prefer the other images, even though I can't see the wall.
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