Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 31, 2010, 8:27 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Brisbane. Queensland, Australia
Posts: 669
Default

jeanfrancois

Have a quick glance at the manual if you get a chance; note that the FZ35 has a Scene mode especially for sunsets; Sarah has posted some very nice shots using this mode before.

Greg
PS No joke!!! ;-)
chillgreg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31, 2010, 8:50 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
skylark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 265
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chillgreg View Post
Well said Sky; spot focus can catch the beginner unawares. It also will struggle against a plain background with no contrast, such as a white wall.

Your advice is excellent, but to the OP, the Face Detection focus mode will in addition to correct focus, also adjust exposure for the face; for example of the face is in shadow it will brighten the overall picture.

If in doubt when you are starting out, try a photo in iA mode, then try P when you have a bit more confidence. Or take one of each, and compare your own creativity with that of the cameras!

Best wishes
Greg
Thanks Greg. We all know that what I posted is exactly what Sarah meant, but just that the actual steps involved might not be obvious to beginners.

Yes, face detection in iA mode is a good start until the shooter gains experience with P-mode settings. My wife only shoots in iA mode no matter how much I try to teach her how to use P-mode. She's just not interested in anything other than pressing the shutter.

Sky
skylark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31, 2010, 10:23 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
skylark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 265
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanfrancois View Post
Thanks a lot for Skylark for your explanation and posting your very nice pictures.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanfrancois View Post
Your explanation helped me. Indeed, it remind me something simila I read on the manual of the FZ35. But it is much more clear with your picture and your nice explanation.

If you have some advise regarding the paramters to fix for sunrise/sunfall pictures (maybe the automatic mode is good enough.. but some explanation would be great : do I need high iso for example (400 iso is enough) ? how long should be the time capture (8s is enough)?, or best paramaters for taking pictures of animals which may move (1/60 shutter speed ?), it will be great too.

cheers,

JF.
Welcome Jean. I haven't shot a lot of sunrise/sunset pictures so I'll leave responses on that for other more qualified folks. Chillgreg's suggestion to use a scene preset is probably the easiest way to go initially.

Sorry for the long post below but thought it might help you. Just ignore it if it is more than you want to do.

-----

Regarding half pressing the shutter to lock in settings, be aware that as Greg alluded to, half pressing the shutter locks both focus "and exposure". So how you setup exposure (called Metering Mode) in the P-mode settings can make a noticeable difference. For instance, metering mode usually has 3 settings called “Spot”, “Center Weighted” and “Multiple”.

* Spot Focus + Spot metering mode: o
Spot metering mode sets exposure primarily in the spot area. If you target a face, focus will be set on the face and exposure will be based entirely on the face which might blow out the rest of the picture. This depends on whether the face is in the shade facing away from the sun, etc.

* Spot Focus + Center Weighted metering mode: [ ]
Center weighted metering mode sets exposure on the center spot and surrounding area around the spot. If you target a face, focus will be set on the face but exposure will be set to the face and a bit of the surrounding area which can result in a better compromised overall exposure of the entire picture. Suggest starting with this setting for metering mode initially.

* Spot Focus + Multiple metering mode: [o]
Multiple metering mode sets exposure on the whole screen. Using this metering mode can make faces look too dark if there is higher backlighting. But sometimes it’s necessary to prevent the background from being too blown out.

Note that the symbols for Center Weighted [ ] and Multiple [o] can be confusing. It confused me until I realized it. For a good while I kept thinking that the brackets with the dot in the center represented Center Weighted and the brackets without the dot represented the whole screen. Although I saw the symbols umpteen times when I read the manual, when I actually set metering mode on the camera I kept thinking [o] represented center weighted. Dumb mistake.
-----

To experience how exposure is locked when the shutter is half pressed, try this. It works in iA or P modes.
1. On a sunny day, hold your camera about 2 feet away from an object that’s in the sunlight.
2. Half press the shutter to lock focus and exposure.
3. Walk to another object that’s in the shade and hold the camera the same distance away from it.
4. The object in the shade will be too dark but in focus.
5. Release the shutter without pressing it and the shaded object will brighten up to the correct exposure.

-----

Finally, I don’t know if the FZ35 has a “Focus/AE Lock” button like the FZ50 has. If yes, set that button to the AE mode only which makes it affect exposure but not focus. Then you can target where you want the exposure to be set, press the “Focus/AE Lock” button to lock the exposure. Then target the face and half press the shutter to lock the focus. Then reframe. Now you have the best focus and exposure for the scene.

Sky

Last edited by skylark; Jun 1, 2010 at 7:04 AM.
skylark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2010, 1:44 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
skylark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 265
Default

Hi Jean,

Just thought of something else to add.

One of the most important settings you can make on your FZ35 if you shoot in P, A or S modes is the “Exposure Compensation” (EC) setting. This setting is not available in iA mode.

To access the EC settings:
- Verify the mode dial is set to P, A or S.
- Press the up navigation button and the EC settings will be displayed.
- Initially it will be set to 0 EV.
- Press the left and right navigation buttons to change the setting.
- Press the up navigation button twice to return to normal shooting mode. (Or half press the shutter)

I’m not sure about the FZ35 but on my FZ50 and most other Panasonic cameras, setting EC to -1/3 for outdoor shooting on sunny days really helps getting the right exposure without blowing highlights. Sometimes a -2/3 setting works. I don't remember needing to set it to -1.

That’s it.

-----

OK, there’s one more thing that you should learn how to use when in P,A or S mode. That’s the live histogram. The histogram display needs to be set to ON in the SETUP menu to see it. Then press the DISPLAY button on the back of the camera while in P,A or S mode to see the histogram.

Here’s what the histogram looks like. Credit for this picture goes to the dcresource.com website. It is in the FZ35 review there. The histogram is the mountain like display at the right. (you probably knew that)



Looking at the histogram while setting Exposure Compensation, will give you really good feedback on whether the EC is set correctly. Like if it’s a cloudy day, you may need to set EC to zero or a + value. Or if you’re indoors and won’t be using flash, EC might be set to a + value.

Just keep the mountains like histogram display so neither the left or right side is mashed against the side of the display. But favor the right side so it is definitely not mashed up against the right side. The bottom of the right side of the rightmost mountain should just touch the right side of the display or be slightly left of that as shown in the picture.

EDIT: The histogram only represents brightness values NOT color. The right side of the histogram represents the brightest parts of the scene. The left side represents the darkest parts of the scene. The mid point represents mid level brightness values. --- In the picture, the big mountain on the right side is mostly the white wall. The narrow mountain on the left side is mostly the dark brown areas. --- Note that the "height" of the mountains has nothing to do with blown highlights or clipped shadows. The height just represents the quantity of each brightness value. Like there is a large amount of white wall so the right mountain is quite high. --- Blown highlights are indicated by the right side of the right mountain touching the right side of the display. Clipped shadows are indicated by the left side of the left mountain touching the left side of the display. --- IOW, clipping of highlights or shadows is a horizontal function NOT a vertical function.

-----

But no need to sweat how to use the histogram yet. If your outdoor photos seem to have blown highlights, just set EC to -1/3 or -2/3 as appropriate.

Sky

Last edited by skylark; Jun 2, 2010 at 8:30 PM. Reason: Added "Or half press the shutter" to exit EC settings. Added S mode.
skylark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2010, 11:27 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

All excellent advice here! Thanks to skylark for clarifying things for me as well. I think that JF is off to a good beginning.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2010, 12:54 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 75
Default here is a picture against the sun.

shoot at around 7:30 pm.

exif data

May 30, 2010
Model: DMC-FZ35
ISO: 80
Exposure: 1/400 sec
Aperture: 6.3
Focal Length: 4.8mm
Flash Used: No
Attached Images
 
__________________
FZ100

Last edited by mamuco; Jun 1, 2010 at 1:02 PM. Reason: exif data
mamuco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2010, 4:27 PM   #17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 15
Default

Hy every body !
Thanks a lot for all your tips !
Especially Skylark : I have materials for working this week-end and make some pictures now !!
I will try to post them next week to have your advise ;o)
PS : kibaris, sorry for the misunderstanding ;o)
jeanfrancois is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2010, 5:23 PM   #18
Junior Member
 
Muzicman61's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Peoria Heights, IL
Posts: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
There are a couple of handy apps available for the iPhone/ipod Touch/maybe iPad too. One i refer to is the Digital SLR Toolkit. I'm not associated with any of them. Here's an answer to your question:

This looks like a pretty neat app. Do you know if it is available for platforms other than the iPhone?

I'm still learning and reading the manual everyday. Sometime I feel like I've hit information overload. But I am confused on exactly how I would set up these settings. When I go to P mode, I see where I can set the ISO value. But I don't see how I can force an aperature of 8 and a shutter speed of 1/60s.

I'm heading to New Orleans on Friday and really trying to learn as much as I can so I can get some good pictures while I'm down there. Maybe even be proud enough of them to post a few.
__________________
FZ35 - Powered by Illudium P-36 Explosive Space Modulator
Muzicman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2010, 5:56 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default

"This looks like a pretty neat app. Do you know if it is available for platforms other than the iPhone?"
No idea, sorry. This stuff is just regular info nicely packaged to be accessible and transportable. A quick few searches turned up:
http://docs.google.com/viewer?url=ht...CheatSheet.pdf

Looks usable. I'll need to print it and examine it further myself.

"I'm heading to New Orleans on Friday and really trying to learn as much as I can so I can get some good pictures while I'm down there."
Now you have a specific need. That's easier to satisfy. Personally I would take 2 cameras, one I've been using a while and the new DSLR. Then I would take lots of pics with each one. At this point, auto is your only option. Let the camera do the heavy lifting and you concentrate on composition.

Others will have their own suggestions.
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 1, 2010, 6:32 PM   #20
Junior Member
 
Muzicman61's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Peoria Heights, IL
Posts: 16
Default

Thanks. I will certainly use a lot of the AI and scene settings. The only digital cameras I've had in the past were on my cell phone. Didn't think the FZ35 was really considered in the DSLR category?
__________________
FZ35 - Powered by Illudium P-36 Explosive Space Modulator
Muzicman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:16 PM.