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Old May 30, 2010, 3:20 PM   #1
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Default tips to make great photo for beginner

Hy,

I have bougth, under the advise of Sarah, the FZ35

But I am quite a dumnies in the field of (digital) camera..

I will go in july to the USA to visit national parks, big sur beach, and San Francisco (to resume).

So, if you have time, could you give me some advise to succeed good pictures with FZ35 for :
shots of animals, nice landscape, desert landscape with a lot of sun, sunrise/fall, and city pictures (days and nigths).

I know that my question may discourage people because it is too much general... sorry for that..
In the worst case, I would be very thanksfull if you could give me some websites which could help me to learn that things.

Thansk a lot for the time you may dedicate to help me (sorry for my english).

JF.
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Old May 30, 2010, 4:24 PM   #2
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JP -

Congratulations on your FZ-35/38 purchase. It is a great camera, and very user friendly. You will learn best by practicing and taking photos. To do so, just follow the check list:

(1) Set Auto ISO
(2) Set "P" for the Programed Auto Mode
(3) Set Spot Focus

Begin Taking Photos by:

(1) Sighting through the EVF and half depressing the shutter release until you get focus confirmation. Remember the camera will focus on the center spot on the EVF.

(2) Don't rapidly push the shutter release from the half way position to the full depression, gradually squeeze the shutter release, actuating the shutter release slowly.

(3) Check the photo you just took on your camera's LCD screen. Did you get what you wanted. If not re-shoot the photo.

That should get you started.

Sarah Joyce
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Old May 31, 2010, 2:17 AM   #3
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A few rules of thumb:
-keep the sun behind your shoulder (beware of your shadow, in that case)
- early morning + afternoon usualy gives beter light quality,
BUT
dont ever forget that rules are made to be broken (at least for photograpy!), so do not hesitate to turn the camera against the sun!
Good practice!
alexander
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Old May 31, 2010, 5:19 PM   #4
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Hy Sarah,

thanks for the first tips.
In fact, I am not so much a beginner.. anyway... I will look into the forum and try to find usefull topics... I though that one would be usefull to other people...

regarding Kibaris answer : I am doubting about your answer.. do you try to make jocke of me ? It is baaaaaaaaaaaad

Well , anyway, thanks for the few lines you wrote

JF.
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Old May 31, 2010, 5:38 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
JP -

Congratulations on your FZ-35/38 purchase. It is a great camera, and very user friendly. You will learn best by practicing and taking photos. To do so, just follow the check list:

(1) Set Auto ISO
(2) Set "P" for the Programed Auto Mode
(3) Set Spot Focus

Begin Taking Photos by:

(1) Sighting through the EVF and half depressing the shutter release until you get focus confirmation. Remember the camera will focus on the center spot on the EVF.

(2) Don't rapidly push the shutter release from the half way position to the full depression, gradually squeeze the shutter release, actuating the shutter release slowly.

(3) Check the photo you just took on your camera's LCD screen. Did you get what you wanted. If not re-shoot the photo.

That should get you started.

Sarah Joyce
To help clarify Sarah's excellent reply, in step-1 place the center spot on the subject that you want in focus. Half press the shutter to lock the focus, reframe the scene on the LCD screen to how you want it to look, then do step-2.

To clarify even further, assume you want the person on the right side of the picture with the center and left side being a flower garden. Place the center spot on the person's face, half press the shutter to lock the focus, reframe the scene to put the person on the right side and include the flowers, then "slowly" continue pressing the shutter all the way down. When the shutter snaps, it should surprise you. The best focus in the scene will be the person's face which is what you want.

Here's an example of placing the person on the right side. My wife at Butchart Gardens in Canada. Taken with a Panasonic FZ50.


Sky

Last edited by skylark; Jun 1, 2010 at 12:36 AM.
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Old May 31, 2010, 7:09 PM   #6
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Well said Sky; spot focus can catch the beginner unawares. It also will struggle against a plain background with no contrast, such as a white wall.

Your advice is excellent, but to the OP, the Face Detection focus mode will in addition to correct focus, also adjust exposure for the face; for example of the face is in shadow it will brighten the overall picture.

If in doubt when you are starting out, try a photo in iA mode, then try P when you have a bit more confidence. Or take one of each, and compare your own creativity with that of the cameras!

Best wishes
Greg
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Old May 31, 2010, 7:15 PM   #7
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Thanks a lot for Skylark for your explanation and posting your very nice pictures.
Your explanation helped me. Indeed, it remind me something simila I read on the manual of the FZ35. But it is much more clear with your picture and your nice explanation.

If you have some advise regarding the paramters to fix for sunrise/sunfall pictures (maybe the automatic mode is good enough.. but some explanation would be great : do I need high iso for example (400 iso is enough) ? how long should be the time capture (8s is enough)?, or best paramaters for taking pictures of animals which may move (1/60 shutter speed ?), it will be great too.

cheers,

JF.
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Old May 31, 2010, 7:31 PM   #8
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There are a couple of handy apps available for the iPhone/ipod Touch/maybe iPad too. One i refer to is the Digital SLR Toolkit. I'm not associated with any of them. Here's an answer to your question:
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Old May 31, 2010, 7:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanfrancois View Post

regarding Kibaris answer : I am doubting about your answer.. do you try to make jocke of me ? It is baaaaaaaaaaaad

Well , anyway, thanks for the few lines you wrote

JF.
i am realy wondering, which part exactly of my post are you doubting?
What I wrote, Is the very first advice for beginers! You should have heard that...
Alexander
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Old May 31, 2010, 8:06 PM   #10
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kibaris. i suspect he didn't really go for "so do not hesitate to turn the camera against the sun".
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