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Old Jul 18, 2010, 5:32 PM   #111
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Originally Posted by skylark View Post
...A good way to practice this is to set a stuffed animal, large doll or even a bag of chips on a window sill. With bright daylight in the background...
Not trying to make a joke but will a bag of chips stand in for a person with any colour complexion? pure white to darkest black? I think so but I'll probably never get to the experiment with real people.
thanks...
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 12:04 AM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
Not trying to make a joke but will a bag of chips stand in for a person with any colour complexion? pure white to darkest black? I think so but I'll probably never get to the experiment with real people.
thanks...
Hi Frank,

The test with a bag of chips on the window sill is not to "fine tune" forced flash back-lit exposures. I don't know how to fine tune forced flash back-lit exposures without having the people lose patience and walk away. --- The test is just to see the difference in exposure using different metering with and without forced flash. Close enough for government work so to speak.

As far as using a bag of chips for the test, I refer you to this digitalcamerainfo back lighting test:

http://www.digitalcamerainfo.com/con...ure--Focus.htm

Digitalcamerainfo used a bag of chips for several camera comparison tests in addition to the link above.

It really isn't a joke...
Sky

Last edited by skylark; Jul 19, 2010 at 12:14 AM.
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 4:21 AM   #113
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I will do this practice test. I'll try different ways, but would you suggest metering be just plain old center-weighted with the subject of interest in the center of the frame? or should i make an effort to meter the outside and let the flash take care of the subject? (using zoom to compensate for distance).
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 7:20 AM   #114
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Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
I will do this practice test. I'll try different ways, but would you suggest metering be just plain old center-weighted with the subject of interest in the center of the frame? or should i make an effort to meter the outside and let the flash take care of the subject? (using zoom to compensate for distance).
Hi Frank,

Refering back to the digitalcamerainfo link that I posted. Photos 1-3 were taken using multi-pattern metering while photos 4-6 were taken using center weighted metering. Note that multi-pattern metering exposed the background a little better than center weighted did. But the difference is rather subtle. Multi-pattern metering will probably be a tad better on the average but not that noticeable.

Quote:
with the subject of interest in the center of the frame?
I usually don't put people in the center of the frame unless it's a group or I'm shooting in portrait orientation. My normal mode for back-lit shots is to set forced flash on, place the center spot on what I want in focus (usually my wife), half press the shutter to lock focus and exposure, re-frame for a pleasing scene, and then squeeze the shutter. When I do this I always make sure the person is facing toward the center of the frame.

Sky

Last edited by skylark; Jul 19, 2010 at 1:27 PM. Reason: added: "or I'm shooting in portrait orientation"
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 5:12 PM   #115
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Thanks for your post Sky and sorry for the late reply - family.
I will do this test too as soon as the rain stops as it will be interesting and educationatl too.
Many thanks again
E.
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Old Nov 21, 2010, 1:40 PM   #116
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Hey there, newcomer with a brand new FZ38 here!

I did a fair bit of research into this camera and it sounded fantastic (have been using Lumixes for a while now). Imagine my surprise when I found that pictures were not as good as smaller digicams!

I think the partial issue is that I expected DSLR-like (not as good though) quality from the get go. It almost has the options of one -- but what I gather the sensor size is massive bottleneck that takes some manual jigging to compensate for. Images about even ISO400 are incredibly noisy.

Outdoor photos seem nice enough, but indoor photos are a pain and a half. I wonder what eysha's experiences are with indoor photography?
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Old Nov 21, 2010, 1:56 PM   #117
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Hi Chupakun, I bought my camera after researching and reading the opinions of others here who love this camera. I too am new to it and lost to be honest. I find reading the manuel very difficult but really would like to learn it. I so wish the manuel was in plain english, easy to understand. I tried to use 'M' setting but couldn't get it to work. is there anywhere where it is really easy to learn how to use this camera?
Indoor photos, i haven't taken a lot. I will post one or two but remember iwas playing with settings and didn't really know what i was doing, or why, or how to take a good indoor shot. E.
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Old Nov 21, 2010, 2:07 PM   #118
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I think the problem is that the camera has an incredible number of options but the manual doesn't explain much -- I guess those explanations are for the realm of photography books!

I mean for a single picture: focus, metering, EV, flash compensation, ISO, aperture, shutter speeds, white balance, exposure... arrrgh.

Is it right in assuming that DSLR owners have fiddled with all these settings and have presets that allow them to take effortlessly incredible pictures? Or do they just 'work' outside of the box? :P
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Old Nov 21, 2010, 2:14 PM   #119
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I have just taken these indoor photos to show you. From them i hope someone will tell me how to take better indoor photos. I reduced the size from 180 res to 72 to reduce the upload size but i have not altered the photos in any other way. E.
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Old Nov 21, 2010, 2:29 PM   #120
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I just realised something. My house is filled with red carpeting and an abundance of tungsten filament lights which means that there's always a strong red/amber glow around it. Cameras can't compare to our eyes so they just eat in this fug.

For starters, I just changed one of the preset white balances (the ones that look like |\1/| and |\2/|) to err strongly towards blue/green since that helps mitigate the craziness. Additionally, bringing the exposure up +1/3 helps fight against the relatively weakness of a yellow/tungsten lights. Bringing the saturation down a notch helped too.

Pictures are looking more 'true to life' now

Although, I think DSLRs are good at making images look 'hyperreal' which is going to be difficult to aim for. I do intend to learn as much as I can with this one before upgrading in the future!
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