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Old Jul 14, 2010, 9:16 AM   #31
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The EXIF is showing multiple modes being used for those shots (taken 4 days ago on the 10th) as if you were experimenting with different mode dial positions to see what impact it would have.

For example, one of the photos is showing Landscape, one is showing Programmed Auto, another is showing Aperture Priority.

Take the last two as an example. The overexposed hands were using the Av (Aperture Value, a.k.a., Aperture Priority) Mode Dial position according to the EXIF, with a +2 EV Setting used for Exposure compensation (which is why it's overexposed).

Did you reset your camera back to factory defaults yet, so that you aren't using settings that are going to overexpose photos by two stops in some modes, as suggested in this post:

How to reset your camera back to factory defaults

I'd do that as a first step if you don't want to continue having exposure problems, as it's pretty obvious from the EXIF that some of those shots are using a +2EV setting with Exposure Compensation. Chances are, the camera is remembering those settings for some modes.

I guess it's possible you have a flaky mode dial (or perhaps iA mode is "borrowing" your existing settings from other modes, depending on content type).

But, I'd reset it to factory defaults as a first step, because all evidence suggests you've got a +2EV setting for Exposure Compensation for some modes (which is going to cause overexposure problems).
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 9:30 AM   #32
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I strongly agree with JimC about resetting your camera to factory defaults. This will be the only way to to see if you have a faulty camera. Reset the camera then go take some more pictures in the IA mode. Then post a few. A lot of information can then be taken from the EXIF
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 9:37 AM   #33
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After resetting it to factory defaults, be careful which buttons you're pressing, too.

From what I can see of the manual, Exposure Compensation may be available in most modes, including iA, just by pressing the up (+-) button on your 4 way control pad and using the left/right arrow keys to set it to a brighter or darker exposure than the camera is metering. Chances are, they're saved in some modes if you press the menu/set button (although it wouldn't surprise me if that's not necessary for shots you take without saving it, as you'd have to try it to find out, since it may interpret pressing the shutter button as the same thing).

Also note that with some cameras, settings are remembered independently for each different mode (and I don't know if your model is like that or not).

P.S.

Exposure Compensation is one of my most frequently used settings with cameras I own (so I can do things like dial in a brighter exposure for backlit subjects in shadows that can fool a metering system, or dial in a darker exposure than metered if it's being fooled by too many darker subjects in the frame and trying to expose some areas too bright).

But, you do need to pay attention to the settings you're using for it, if you don't want severe Exposure Problems (as in your photos using a +2 EV Setting, which is causing overexposed images).
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 9:39 AM   #34
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Can you also get your daughters camera and take a picture of the LCD display of the FZ38 and post it? I know you have talked about the "best" way to set the LCD display. The "view" on the LCD screen can give you lots of good info if you have it set a certain way.
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 9:50 AM   #35
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Hello Eysha, I suspect that I am in a similar situation to you, I bought the FZ38 after looking at all the reviews and specifically for the zoom capabilities ahead of a trip to Florida and the theme parks. I needed to be sure that I caught the photos I wanted as most of the time I wouldn't get a second chance. I studied the manual and tried to gather suggested settings for different situations but in the end seemed to fret more about the camera than enjoying the moment. I did get good shots, but I also got poor ones and perhaps having the limitations of a pure point and shoot could be a good thing? Having said that, the more I use the FZ38 the more I enjoy it.
I mucked about to the point of needing a reset too, now I mostly only make alterations in the custom modes although I will adjust the exposure but usually only because I have read I should and not through trial and error.
My take on what you should do? If possible take a morning and shoot a load of photos in lots of different situations (indoors / outdoors / static and moving objects / kids etc ALL in the IA setting and without making adjustments and check the exif data to convince yourself the problems you had were inexperience rather than a faulty camera. If you can do this and remain with the FZ38 then just keep practising, try shooting beforehand in the kind of situation you want photos of and don't be afraid to reset and start again.
If you decide to go with a different camera then you may find it even more difficult to set up, I think if I changed now I would err towards the limits of a point and shoot as instead of changing settings to get the perfect shot, I tend to move away from what I want to end up with.
Maybe I'm just a luddite.
Good luck.
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 9:55 AM   #36
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Shorter answer:

Your camera was using a +2EV setting with Exposure Compensation for your overexposed images. It's not going to do that by default.

So, I'd Reset it to Factory Defaults using the RESET choice in your Setup menus.

Then, it should not use Exposure Compensation in any mode unless you tell it to (and that may have occurred by accident without realizing it when pressing the controller key pads, so check it periodically to make sure it's on zero if you experience any further issues with it).
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 10:46 AM   #37
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Thanks again for the posts. Jim, when i first got the camera i played around with it and as Clint says i did post to ask how to get stuff of the LCD and he, i think it was he, told me to reset it to factory defaults, which i did and haven't played around with it since as i was going away and didn't want to mess up so it was reset to factory default settings before i went away and i truly didn't mess with it. As said earlier i cannot see how i could have altered the EC settings by accident, i conseed it is possible but i don't think i did that as it takes time to alter settings. In iA q menue it only shows the photo size, 12, 5, 3, 10.5 etc and the video, SH and LCD mode and you have to press a button to get those. The EC can be got but again by pressing a button and then pressing to get + or - values. I literally only used the camera as a point and shoot on iA mode only. I take it that no one thinks the camera is faulty but it did this by user error? If so no problem just so long as i know as i don't want to be lumbered with a faulty camera especially when i didn't buy the insurance on it. Oh and i have reset it yet again to factory default settings. Should i keep or return the filters? Opinions please. they were 9.80P so i guess about $20, i think.
Bensonboo, i think we are smilar in that your post was similar to what i did too. I played with it then reset it. Sarah feels newbies should work and learn the P mode and i agree i guess but i used the iA mode for safety but it wasn't so safe for me, lol. I will take photos tomorrow if i can - i say that as i came back after having over done things so not in top form right now with hip/leg problems - of dear, lol. I guess i am only really worried that it might be a faulty camera, if it is just me well then i can learn to kick myself even harder for being an idiot, lol. Still don't understand how it set itself to EC without my saying so, maybe i have a camera that does as it likes, like some unruly child - is that possible, lol? I will keep reading and learning and trying but i need to know if it is me at fault or the camera as i cannot afford to buy again.
thanks for the help/advice and posts, i appreciate them all.
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 10:55 AM   #38
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I would keep the filters - the UV filter will protect your lens.
When you are able take some more pictures in the iA mode and post them.
It also sounds like you have the LCD displaying the icons and appropriate info.
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 11:09 AM   #39
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It may have been your daughter, too. All it would take is to press the top button (+-) button on the controller pad, then use the right controller pad button to brighten the exposure. I also suspect pressing the shutter button to take a photo allows those settings to be used without doing anything else if the control pad was being "played with" to see what it did (and if the menu button was pressed after messing around with the controller pad, that would probably save the settings, too).

Changing that setting is designed to be easy on purpose (because Exposure Compensation can be a frequently used setting when difficult lighting requires it, as in backlit subjects in shadows that may be underexposed unless you use a +EV setting). That's because a camera has limited dynamic range (ability to capture a greater range from bright to dark). So, it may try to properly expose a brighter background (leaving the darker subjects in shadows underexposed), or vice-versa (properly expose the darker areas, leaving the brighter areas overexposed), unless you use your Exposure Compensation feature (by brightening or darkening the overall exposure as desired, compared to the way the camera metered the scene).

You can't always get everything in a scene properly exposed when you have a big difference between the lighting in the brighter and darker areas. So, Exposure Compensation gives you more flexibility so that that portions of the scene you're more interested in are properly exposed, since you have a limited range of bright to dark a camera is capable of capturing. It's one of my most frequently used settings with cameras I own.
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Old Jul 14, 2010, 11:11 AM   #40
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Ok Clint i will keep them. yes i have the icons displayed on the LCD as you can see. Are tehy right? it is still in iA mode setting.
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