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Old Aug 24, 2010, 4:17 PM   #11
LEK
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Forzahibs, in answer to your question, I hardly know anything myself yet, I've been reading some books and playing with settings, but I am using terms at this point with partial understanding, and as they say, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. That being said, my understanding of the above terms is as follows. Surely some of the more experienced photographers may be able to clarify more, or please correct me if I don't have this right.

I think white balance is the way that white shows on the photo, is it true white or is there an artificial cast of color on the white sections. You can change how the camera reads the white balance so that the color comes out as true white, but I'm not sure how or when at this point. I'm not clear what Sarah saw in the photo, perhaps a yellow cast to the white belly?

Exposure is basically the amount of light a photo was exposed to, over exposed is too much, underexposed is too little light. Has to do with shutter speeds and aperture settings in the camera which is way beyond me at this point. Unless you have it on manual settings the camera makes these decisions for the most part, and I hear that many point and shoots tend to overexpose. Some of my earlier photos were overexposed, which made them washed out. Underexposed would make them too dark. There's a setting on many cameras that you can compensate for the amount of light the camera is letting in if it seems wrong. You can turn it higher or lower. That's called ev compensation(exposure value compensation). The histogram is a tool in some cameras that shows how the picture is exposed and can guide you in whether the photo needs ev compensation, which I have found very helpful. The common wisdom seems to be that many point and shoots tend to overexpose in bright sunlight and turning the ev compensation to - 1/3 or - 2/3 helps a photo be exposed correctly. I found this to be the case in the photos I posted yesterday.
Okay, that's the limit of my knowledge and hopefully it's correct, even if a little basic.
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Old Aug 24, 2010, 4:27 PM   #12
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Forzahibs, in answer to your question, I hardly know anything myself yet, I've been reading some books and playing with settings, but I am using terms at this point with partial understanding, and as they say, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. That being said, my understanding of the above terms is as follows. Surely some of the more experienced photographers may be able to clarify more, or please correct me if I don't have this right.

I think white balance is the way that white shows on the photo, is it true white or is there an artificial cast of color on the white sections. You can change how the camera reads the white balance so that the color comes out as true white, but I'm not sure how or when at this point. I'm not clear what Sarah saw in the photo, perhaps a yellow cast to the white belly?

Exposure is basically the amount of light a photo was exposed to, over exposed is too much, underexposed is too little light. Has to do with shutter speeds and aperture settings in the camera which is way beyond me at this point. Unless you have it on manual settings the camera makes these decisions for the most part, and I hear that many point and shoots tend to overexpose. Some of my earlier photos were overexposed, which made them washed out. Underexposed would make them too dark. There's a setting on many cameras that you can compensate for the amount of light the camera is letting in if it seems wrong. You can turn it higher or lower. That's called ev compensation(exposure value compensation). The histogram is a tool in some cameras that shows how the picture is exposed and can guide you in whether the photo needs ev compensation, which I have found very helpful. The common wisdom seems to be that many point and shoots tend to overexpose in bright sunlight and turning the ev compensation to - 1/3 or - 2/3 helps a photo be exposed correctly. I found this to be the case in the photos I posted yesterday.
Okay, that's the limit of my knowledge and hopefully it's correct, even if a little basic.
Thanks for that mate , much appreciated . It's interesting when people can just see these things in a photo so i'm trying to see what others are seeing .
Very nice photos by the way , i must get out and try a few
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Old Aug 24, 2010, 9:43 PM   #13
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Forzahibs-

When you own 110 digital cameras, have taught digital cameras for 15 years, have written 4 books on digital cameras, and worked a a professional photographer, it is not too difficult at all, to pick up small items in photos, when you are trying to help someone.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 24, 2010, 11:21 PM   #14
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Sarah, what did you see in the squirrel that lead you to say it needed a white balance correction? And how could I have seen it, avoided it or corrected it before taking the picture?
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 12:22 AM   #15
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That's a great start!
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 1:08 AM   #16
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Forzahibs-

When you own 110 digital cameras, have taught digital cameras for 15 years, have written 4 books on digital cameras, and worked a a professional photographer, it is not too difficult at all, to pick up small items in photos, when you are trying to help someone.

Sarah Joyce
Sarah , I wasn't being critical i was merely trying to find out what you saw
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 1:41 AM   #17
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Thanks Sarah. White balance correction, is there a way I would be able to tell that before taking the picture(like I can tell exposure problems though the histogram)? How would I have corrected it in that picture? My beginning photography workshops are coming up in a month, hope that helps alot.
Usually the symptoms of an OFF white balance are the color casts produced by incorrect WB settings. The three most obvious casts are: 1) bluish if the WB is set to a cold light spectrum such as flash or fluorescent light but you are shooting in bright daylight; 2) orang'ish if the WB is set to daylight and you are shooting under tungsten light or 3) brown'ish is the WB is set for shade or cloudy but you are shooting under sunny conditions. These are the obvious ones. Of course you could have subtle effects, which may not be as easily detectable until you actually download the image to a computer and look at it on a bigger screen. Most people are afraid of messing around with WB settings and that's a huge mistake because many cameras' won't handle WB correctly when set to AUTO WB depending on the conditions. Most cameras will do well in bright daylight but as soon as you are in the shade, the camera will produce a much colder image (with a slight blue cast). Never mind indoors under artificial light. So, the more WB control you camera offers, the more you should take advantage of it. Play with it so you understand the effect of increasing magenta over blue or green over yellow, etc.

The squirrel picture has a slight bluish tone to it, reason why Sarah suggested an incorrect WB. However, it is very subtle and it can easily be fixed in any photo editor software by warming it up a notch. Hope this helps.
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 11:12 AM   #18
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Usually the symptoms of an OFF white balance are the color casts produced by incorrect WB settings. The three most obvious casts are: 1) bluish if the WB is set to a cold light spectrum such as flash or fluorescent light but you are shooting in bright daylight; 2) orang'ish if the WB is set to daylight and you are shooting under tungsten light or 3) brown'ish is the WB is set for shade or cloudy but you are shooting under sunny conditions. These are the obvious ones. Of course you could have subtle effects, which may not be as easily detectable until you actually download the image to a computer and look at it on a bigger screen. Most people are afraid of messing around with WB settings and that's a huge mistake because many cameras' won't handle WB correctly when set to AUTO WB depending on the conditions. Most cameras will do well in bright daylight but as soon as you are in the shade, the camera will produce a much colder image (with a slight blue cast). Never mind indoors under artificial light. So, the more WB control you camera offers, the more you should take advantage of it. Play with it so you understand the effect of increasing magenta over blue or green over yellow, etc.

The squirrel picture has a slight bluish tone to it, reason why Sarah suggested an incorrect WB. However, it is very subtle and it can easily be fixed in any photo editor software by warming it up a notch. Hope this helps.
That's the kind of answer i was hoping for , now i know the sort of thing to look for (or how to avoid it)
Thanks for taking the time to explain
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 11:35 AM   #19
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Tullio has nicely handled the WB indications. Thanks, Tulio. The FZ-35 has the ability to set a manual WB which would have worked nicely, or the WB can be corrected during post processing.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 2:05 PM   #20
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Thanks very much Tullio and Mtclimber for the white balance explanation. It's so good to get other eyes on my photos because there is so much I simply don't see with my untrained eyes, and that the experts do see. (I don't want to speak for him but I think that may be what Forzahibs was trying to say). From your explanations I gather that the blue cast was because I was standing in sunlight but shooting with the zoom into a shady area under the tree. Very good to know. Your help is very appreciated as always, thanks again.
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