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Old Aug 25, 2010, 7:36 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by LEK View Post
... From your explanations I gather that the blue cast was because I was standing in sunlight but shooting with the zoom into a shady area under the tree. ...
You're correct. It does not matter whether you are under the sun or not. If the subject is in the shade and you zoom in, the camera might have a bit of a hard time adjusting the WB correctly (some cameras more than others). The problem is, sometimes you don't have the time to check (and adjust) various camera settings. You want to capture the moment, period. So, the squirrel photo is good enough as is and if you really feel that it needs WB adjustments, you can do it in PP.
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 9:00 PM   #22
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This is just a test shot so it doesn't matter, but I'm going to Alaska next summer and will be shooting under conditions(clouds, rain, snow fields, glaciers, water) that will probably require me to know what I'm doing with white balance, as well as exposure. Good to get started now. Also good to know that white balance can be fixed in post processing, as you said, often I'm just going to want to get the shot and can't fiddle with the camera, especially with wildlife.
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 9:19 PM   #23
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Shooting in snow is not an easy task. Because snow reflects so much light, the camera often over exposes the bright areas. So, I always set the exposure to -0.3 (at least). Snow also makes the camera produce a blue cast in shaded areas. So, when I shoot snow I either set the camera to scene mode SNOW or I set the WB to daylight and adjust the image in PP. Setting WB to cloudy or shade will turn the snow yellowish, which is not that easy to fix.
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 10:05 PM   #24
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Yes, that's exactly what happened when I took photos in Yosemite this past December, with my old Canon point and shoot set to auto, many of the photos were all washed out and yellowish, really bad. Actually, that experience is what motivated me to start to educate myself on how to use my new cameras. So if there's alot of snow or we're on a glacier I set ev compensation to -1/3 or -2/3(no matter what the histogram says) and scene mode to snow, but keep the white balance on auto, and if it's just a cloudy or rainy day but there's not alot of snow, I set the white balance to cloudy and do what the histogram says for ev compensation. Do I have that right? I need to read more and practice this winter in the snow, and I'll probably put up a separate post on shooting in snow much later on down the road, but that gets me started with some good information. thanks very much for the help.
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Old Aug 25, 2010, 10:58 PM   #25
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I don't believe you can set the WB when you select a scene mode. The camera will make the adjustments based on the scene selection. As long as the camera handles those scene modes well, you're good. Not all scene modes produce the best quality image. In order to make the adjustments that best fit your taste, you must use P/A/S or M.
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