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Old Sep 9, 2010, 11:15 AM   #1
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Default wedding pictures with fz35

Hello,

What would your settings for indoor wedding? Wedding would be in hall. Should i use flash? ISO amount and also which mode should i use A-P?

P.S: I wont take the shoots mostly i will be in square so anyone shouldn't mess up settings.

Last edited by imut; Sep 9, 2010 at 11:19 AM. Reason: typo
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Old Sep 9, 2010, 7:53 PM   #2
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imut-

We really need more details about the wedding lighting and the "square?" Am I to understand that somebody other than yourself will be taking these photos? All I can offer, based on what you have told us thus far, are some very general directions:

If you are indoors and desire to take a flash photo using the camera’s built-in flash unit (a) check that the Flash Selector is still selected to the Auto Flash mode. (b) recheck that the WB is still set to Auto ISO. (c) Keep the camera to subject distance at 11.5 feet or less to achieve the proper exposure. If you are photographing a group and you must increase the amount of light projected from the camera’s built-in flash unit so that the Flash Range can be increased from the normal maximum Flash Range of 11.5 feet, to a greater value. The adjustment on the Flash Compensation scale works in the same way as Exposure Compensation did. Positive Flash Compensation increases the flash output and the Flash Range. Negative Flash Compensation reduces the flash output and the Flash Range.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 4:54 AM   #3
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When i hire the place i will give you more info Sarah. Yes somebody who doesn't understand photograph will take the shoots. Under these general directions, later i may post product these pictures with lightroom or other tools.

Positive Flash Compensation, how can i achieve this, by increasing ISO?
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 12:36 PM   #4
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Check you Owner's manual, Imut-

When the flash is deployed, it is right behind the Exposure Compensation menu.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 11, 2010, 11:24 AM   #5
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Quote:
If you are indoors and desire to take a flash photo using the camera’s built-in flash unit (a) check that the Flash Selector is still selected to the Auto Flash mode. (b) recheck that the WB is still set to Auto ISO. (c) Keep the camera to subject distance at 11.5 feet or less to achieve the proper exposure. If you are photographing a group and you must increase the amount of light projected from the camera’s built-in flash unit so that the Flash Range can be increased from the normal maximum Flash Range of 11.5 feet, to a greater value. The adjustment on the Flash Compensation scale works in the same way as Exposure Compensation did. Positive Flash Compensation increases the flash output and the Flash Range. Negative Flash Compensation reduces the flash output and the Flash Range.
Sarah:

I've noticed you giving this type of advise more than once lately (use Flash Exposure Compensation to increase Flash Range), and I'm going to *strongly* disagree.

Flash Exposure Compensation should only be used if your flash photos are not exposed properly. That can happen when your subjects are too bright (for example, white wedding dresses that may reflect more light, or a backlit subject, requiring a +EV compensation to prevent underexposure); or black tuxedos that don't reflect enough light, resulting in an overexposed image (where the black starts turning more gray), requiring a -EV Flash Exposure Compensation setting to prevent overexposure.

Flash Exposure Compensation is *NOT* designed to increase flash range. In fact, it can't increase flash range if the camera is already using a full power flash, provided your aperture setting and ISO speed is constant.

Cameras control the amount of exposure from the flash using flash burst length. Basically, the camera uses a metering pre-flash. Then, adjusts the flash burst length, based on the amount of reflected light it sees to determine the length of the main flash burst needed.

If the flash burst is already as long as it can be (i.e., a full power flash), then you can't make it longer using flash exposure compensation, because the flash capacitor is already fully discharged with a full power flash. There's no magical setting that can get around that (you can't give the camera a larger capacitor charge by using Flash Exposure Compensation).

The amount of light the camera sees from the flash is going to be determined by the aperture, ISO speed, subject distance, and flash burst length for a given flash tube and capacitor. If it's already using it's longest flash burst length (which it will for a neutral subject if you're at maximum range), you can't change that behavior using Flash Exposure Compensation settings, as you're limited by the capacity of the capacitor.

But, if you try to use a +EV Flash Exposure Compensation when you're within the maximum range of the flash (which is what you're telling the OP to do with a subject more than 11.5 feet away), you're going to get overexposed photos using that technique with a neutral subject if that subject is still within the maximum range of the flash.

If you're already further away than the maximum range, use of a +EV setting with Flash Exposure Compensation isn't going to make any difference (since the flash capacitor will already be full discharged), resulting in an underexposed image.

Note that the rated flash range of the OP's camera using Auto ISO is 27.9 feet on the wide end of the zoom range (where the camera has and available aperture of f/2.8), dropping down to 17.7 feet if you zoom in to longer focal lengths (because the camera has a widest aperture of f/4.4 available at the long end of the zoom range).

See page 67 of the user guide here:

http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPER...MCFZ35-ADV.PDF

Note that Auto ISO may increase ISO speed to ISO 800 to achieve the ranges listed. If you set ISO speed manually, refer to the table to determine maximum range.

Basically, your recommendation to use a +EV setting with exposure compensation when you're within the maximum flash range (which will depend on the ISO speed and aperture being used), will result in an overexposed (too bright) image if the subject is neutral.

If you're already outside of the maximum range with a neutral subject, then a +EV setting will make no difference (since the flash capacitor will already be full discharged with a full power flash).

The *only* reason you should ever use flash exposure compensation is if you're getting underexposed images because the subject reflects too much light (as you may get with lighter clothing (which can reflect too much light resulting in an underexposed image); or when you have a darker subject (which may require a -EV compensation to prevent overexposure because the subject is not reflecting enough light).

Flash exposure compensation is not intended to increase flash range, period; and it can't increase flash range if the flash is already using a full power flash (which it will be using if your subject is neutral and is already at the maximum range supported by the camera).

If you try to use it to use a +EV Flash Exposure Compensation setting with a neutral subject, and you're within the stated flash range (e.g., the example quoted at 11.5 feet away), you can ruin images (because they'll be overexposed, which can result in blown highlights with a neutral subject).
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Old Sep 11, 2010, 1:38 PM   #6
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Point well taken, JimC-

I was just trying to simplify taking flash photos with the Fz-35's built-in flash unit. I have shot lots of flash photos with the FZ-18, the FZ-28, and the FZ-35 and when shooting into a darkened area, the flash output literally get "swallowed-up" (another way of expressing it is to say that that more flash "power" in needed in such situations) Therefore, I have pushed the use of the "P" mode, and Auto ISO, with a restricted camera to subject distance (11.5 feet) to handle situations where the lighting effect of the FZ-35's built-in flash unit is effectively "swallowed up" by a very dark photo environment.

This Turkish wedding environment seemed to present that kind of photo environment.

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; Sep 11, 2010 at 1:40 PM.
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