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Old Sep 18, 2010, 11:10 AM   #1
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Default Help with my new FZ35

Hello! I hope that I have come to the right place for help!! I just received my new FZ35 and so far am not happy. I'm hoping I am just doing something wrong though. I want to find out before I return it! I upgraded cameras b/c I was tired of the blurry pictures of my little boy. Let's just say he doesn't sit still too well! Last night I took some pics of him in IA and P mode and they were very blurry still. I tried the sport mode and it worked but not sure if I should just leave in sports mode all of the time? Please help!!
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 11:25 AM   #2
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I am talking from the FZ100 perspective, but for low light indoor photos you will always need a tripod (or at least very steady hands) and flash. You want to keep the ISO as low as possible. I never had much luck with IA indoors, I just do not like the colors. Set motion deblur ON. I am still testing/learning P mode for indoor photos. For low light indoor (motion intensive) photos I got the best results on Sports, SCN (panning) and Party. All with the use of flash.
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 11:32 AM   #3
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Amateur I'm new to an FZ-35 myself and after owning it for a week, I've had to realize its much better with the right settings than with the wrong settings so, I would suggest some testing before you return it.

ISO 1600 makes for very blurry images period which is why you should avoid it at all costs and intelligent auto sometimes chooses ISO 1600 in indoor low light settings so try Programmable Auto mode first.

I suggest trying my settings as a starting point to seeing if you see any improvement.

Select Programmable Auto
Click on menu set in the top right record,
Choose picture quality 12m
quality extra fine Looks like ===
Aspect Ration 4:3 is fine (I prefer 3:2 personally)
Intelligent ISO - ON
ISO Limit Set - 400 (I really hate blur so I set it low at 400)
White Balance - AWB
Face Recogn OFF
AF Mode - Area
Pre AF - Q-AF
AF/AE Lock - AF/AE
Metering Mode - Both looks like (.)
I. Exposure OFF
Min Shutter Speed - Blanked out
Digital Zoom - OFF (Do not use digital zoom under any circumstance - it blurs the image, instead if you want more zoom reduce the megapixels of the image and you'll get more zoom)
Color effect - Off
Pict. Adjust - This one is purely upto you
Stabilizer - Auto
AF Assist Lamp - on
Flash Synchro - 1st
Red Eye Removal - On
Converstion Off

Hope this helps,

But let us know how that works out for you

Last edited by Jyaku; Sep 18, 2010 at 1:10 PM.
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 11:53 AM   #4
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Hmm, I definitely don't want to use the tripod all the time inside. Is the difference between FZ35 and the DSLR's?

Where is the motion deblur?
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 12:03 PM   #5
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Thank you Jake, I"m trying that now!
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 12:07 PM   #6
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Jake - I did that setting and it did help on the indoor pictures, thanks! It would help if I understood all the lingo!
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 12:09 PM   #7
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Generally speaking, indoor photos need flash to obtain the correct indoor exposure.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 12:10 PM   #8
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Also have one more question, sorry.... should i get some sort of protector for the lcd screen?

Any other helpful tips would be GREATLY appreciated!!
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 12:15 PM   #9
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I got a Nikon UV filter to protect lens.
It really helped when I was in the brush plucking some plums and taking pictures.
I have not thought about LCD protector screen yet.
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Old Sep 18, 2010, 1:00 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amateurkidspicturetaker View Post
Also have one more question, sorry.... should i get some sort of protector for the lcd screen?

Any other helpful tips would be GREATLY appreciated!!
To be honest, I went back to the viewfinder because then you tend to shake the camera less since it rests up against your cheek and 2 hands creating a tripod effect compared to the lcd where there are only 2 hands and it can wobble and shake.

I've never ever been worried about LCD's on digital cameras since I've not managed to break/ dent one in 8+ years since owning one. That said however I do sometimes get greasy hands on the lcd but the stains can be wiped off with a cloth.

I was however going to get a filter for the lens just so the camera lens isn't damaged.

And yes mtclimber is right. Indoor use flash unless enough sunlight and you want to capture ambience.

As for the lingo.. the only real thing you need to be watching in the LCD or viewfinder is the number on the bottom right. It'll appear after you gently press the shutter key down to half and brings the image into focus. It'll be a number anywhere from 1/250 to 8.

This is the most important number because it tells you how long it'll take to record the image. 8 means 8 seconds so you need to hold the camera still (but this is very rare). If it says 1 (it means 1 second), 1/2 means 1/2 a second, 1/10 means 1/10th a second and so and so on. So once you press the shutter down half way, it tells you how long to hold the camera still for and gently press all the way down on the shutter to capture the image.

The rest of the lingo you can let the camera decide for itself and then look up later on as you get more confident with the images.

Also another tip.. don't try to put the subject of the picture always in the center, instead zoom in a bit and fill the image or put the subject a bit to the side. It tends to create for much better snaps.
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