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Old Sep 28, 2010, 7:16 PM   #1
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Default longest time to hold steady?

I'm sorry for asking this question, I know it came up on one of the threads fairly recently, but I can't find it...

Without using a tripod, monopod, or other steadying device, what is generally the longest shutter speed that is realistic?

Thanks in advance.
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Old Sep 28, 2010, 7:37 PM   #2
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Depends on the person - if you're old and shaky or young and steady.

Is the subject moving?

Sometimes I can get a picture at 1/30 of a second if nothing moves but usually it comes out blurry. 1/60 is a bit better for me.
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Old Sep 28, 2010, 7:43 PM   #3
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I'm probably in the middle of "old and shaky" & "young and steady"!

I'm specifically trying to get a feel for taking pictures that have moving water. So I guess that qualifies as a landscape with hopefully the land being still (no earthquakes please!) I really like how the water can look all blurry (probably not the right term) and I want to try to do it. I tried yesterday with one of my little backyard fountains and I did get the water sort of right, but some leaves in the foreground were very shaky. The res of it looked OK, at least to me for my first tries, but I want to improve. Can't remember the shutter speed I used and don't have the photo with me at the moment....
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Old Sep 28, 2010, 7:43 PM   #4
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For safety sake, and to prevent blurring, Clint's numbers are right on target.

In a pinch, I have hand held down to a shutter speed of 1/8th of a second and got a good shot as there was no other way to get the photo. I got lucky! I am 75 years old. I was proud I was able to pull it off. But please keep in mind it was a chancey situation at that shutter speed.

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Old Sep 28, 2010, 7:59 PM   #5
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a simple rule of thumb is 1/the range you are shooting. So if you are at 200mm eq you should be at 1/200. The longer the range the harder it is to hold long.

But some people are steadier then others, I can hand hold a 50mm 1.4 or 28mm 1.8 at 1/16 to 1/2 sec. But then a friend that is not steady she goes with 1/ the range.
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Old Sep 28, 2010, 8:33 PM   #6
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It varies from person to person and I don't think there is an average or standard value for this. I have comfortably taken photos at 1/10th of a second. And I have fumbled at higher speeds too.
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Old Sep 28, 2010, 8:42 PM   #7
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That is true IS does change things up also on how long someone can handhold.
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Old Sep 29, 2010, 12:46 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint501 View Post
Depends on the person - if you're old and shaky or young and steady.

Is the subject moving?

Sometimes I can get a picture at 1/30 of a second if nothing moves but usually it comes out blurry. 1/60 is a bit better for me.
Clint is right on the money...

Everyone has a heart that beats and with long focal lengths even your heart beating can blur the photo....

1/3 is about as good as Power OIS gets and that is still marginal at times as Clint has stated....
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Old Sep 29, 2010, 12:48 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VncvrIslandGirl View Post
I'm probably in the middle of "old and shaky" & "young and steady"!

I'm specifically trying to get a feel for taking pictures that have moving water. So I guess that qualifies as a landscape with hopefully the land being still (no earthquakes please!) I really like how the water can look all blurry (probably not the right term) and I want to try to do it. I tried yesterday with one of my little backyard fountains and I did get the water sort of right, but some leaves in the foreground were very shaky. The res of it looked OK, at least to me for my first tries, but I want to improve. Can't remember the shutter speed I used and don't have the photo with me at the moment....
You'll need a long shutter and tripod to make the water look soft and if you do it in bright light a ND
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Old Sep 29, 2010, 6:48 AM   #10
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When shooting at extended tele I always use my wife's left shoulder to steady the shot. I tell her to hold still while I hold still. It works.
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