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Old Oct 7, 2010, 12:21 PM   #1
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Default FZ100 crispness and detail settings help

I'm pretty happy with my new FZ100, but I do have a few questions.

I haven't even had the FZ100 a week, and it's been cloudy or rained almost everyday since I picked it up. So, no full sunny days.

I don't seem to be getting the crispness in the images that I have hoped for. The photos that I'm seeing as examples are taken at a much smaller size than mine and they look great. But, you can't look as closely at them because of the size, so I'm finding flaws in mine. Detail, crispness, etc.

I have used the full out large picture size from the beginning. What ratio and size would be a good starting point? Also, once I decide on the ratio and size, what metering is best?

Of course I want the best possible images, and I know that reducing the size will help with storage, but would changing these things reduce the noise and crispness at all?

Thanks.
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Old Oct 7, 2010, 12:46 PM   #2
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I don't know much about this subject but I'll share what I've done with my Big Fuzzy.

I use 16:9 ratio for both iA and P,A, and S modes. I like bright colorful pictures so in iA I have selected "Happy" mode. On P,A and S, I experimented around and found that V (vivid) was my choice. Within the V setting, I bumped the saturation +1. I'm very happy with my pictures and videos. At least half of the serious pictures I've taken were in 11fps or 5fps w/AF. The bursts are just as good as pictures taken one at a time.

The ONLY problem I've had was with indoor flash shots. Compared with my FZ35, everything from Big Fuzzy came out dark in P,A and S. iA is best by far with flash in my FZ100. I bumped the flash power by +2/3 and now get good results, but iA for some reason is still best. iA takes advantage of several "Intelligent" features which I have not enabled in the other modes.

At the Little League games I've been photographing, I try to use 1A once in awhile just for comparison to my normal selections. Even with moving subjects, 1A is very hard to beat.

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Old Oct 7, 2010, 10:22 PM   #3
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Logansdad-

Crispness and sharpness are a function of, among other things, bright sunshine and spot on exposure with the FZ-100. When posting an image, the image size must be reduced to a max of 700 pixels on the largest side of the photo.

In terms of camera set-up on my FZ-35 (before I sold it, awaiting the new models) I used spot focusing and spot metering.

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Old Oct 8, 2010, 3:01 PM   #4
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Thanks Setter Dog.

@Mtclimer, I actually found a post asking how to spot focus from Setter Dog, answered by Clint. I'll give that a try.

Thanks!
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Old Oct 8, 2010, 3:20 PM   #5
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also, if you are viewing your photos at 100% magnification you will see artifacts/noise etc with any small sensor camera. however, you never present a photo at this type of magnification. so these types of anomolies should only be a problem if you can see them at normal print/viewing sizes.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 1:38 PM   #6
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Quote:
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however, you never present a photo at this type of magnification. so these types of anomolies should only be a problem if you can see them at normal print/viewing sizes.

It's really a relief to hear this type of advice.

To hear some folks go on, you'd think it was a cardinal sin to have noise in your shots sometimes, I think ...
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 12:02 AM   #7
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Thanks Hards80. Really good tip.

Scaling down? (Maybe that's not the term, is it?) I've noticed that over the past few day.

Last edited by Logansdad; Oct 10, 2010 at 12:13 AM.
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 11:08 AM   #8
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I am loving this camera, here is some advice I got from digby dart @ dpreview.com.

Your images are fine, to improve the image quality just:

1. Go through the manual and set the camera to either Aperture or Stutter Priority and learn how to use the camera one of these settings. The camera will respond to other controls better in either of these two modes (or full manual).

2. Now that you have the camera is a more responsive mode, before shooting set all the film settings to -2 except sharpness, leave that at 0. Then set the ev between -0.3 ev to -1ev so any really bright areas will not just come out as pure white (called blown hightlights).

3. When shooting, rotating the little wheel will change either the aperture (in aperture priority mode - A on the top dial) or the shutter speed (in shutter priority mode - S on the top dial) so you can make the image darker or lighter.

4. Clicking the wheel in and then turning, the little wheel changes the exposure in ev between -2 to +2, so again keep it between -0.3 and -1 so you donít get any pure white areas. Click the little wheel again and it returns to changing either the shutter speed or aperture.
Practice with the above will have you shooting like a pro in no time as long as you put in the effort practicing.

Your friend was pretty right about iso, but really iso can be seen as fine detail needing lots of light (low iso) and grainer less detailed needing lots less light (high iso). So with film, iso25 needs lots of light but gives very fine results while iso800 needs far less light ( six times less light) but the results will be very grainy. Digital is the same, except instead of being called grain the lack of detail looks more like noise.

As far as iso is concerned, set it manually to iso100 (lowest setting on the fz100) and leave it there till you practice enough to be confident about what your doing.

Your friends Canon 7d is a really good camera, but he will never be able to get the lens you have on your fz100 for it.
I hope this helps.
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Old Oct 11, 2010, 9:13 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jagsbch View Post
I am loving this camera, here is some advice I got from digby dart @ dpreview.com.

Your images are fine, to improve the image quality just:

1. Go through the manual and set the camera to either Aperture or Stutter Priority and learn how to use the camera one of these settings. The camera will respond to other controls better in either of these two modes (or full manual).

2. Now that you have the camera is a more responsive mode, before shooting set all the film settings to -2 except sharpness, leave that at 0. Then set the ev between -0.3 ev to -1ev so any really bright areas will not just come out as pure white (called blown hightlights).

3. When shooting, rotating the little wheel will change either the aperture (in aperture priority mode - A on the top dial) or the shutter speed (in shutter priority mode - S on the top dial) so you can make the image darker or lighter.

4. Clicking the wheel in and then turning, the little wheel changes the exposure in ev between -2 to +2, so again keep it between -0.3 and -1 so you donít get any pure white areas. Click the little wheel again and it returns to changing either the shutter speed or aperture.
Practice with the above will have you shooting like a pro in no time as long as you put in the effort practicing.

Your friend was pretty right about iso, but really iso can be seen as fine detail needing lots of light (low iso) and grainer less detailed needing lots less light (high iso). So with film, iso25 needs lots of light but gives very fine results while iso800 needs far less light ( six times less light) but the results will be very grainy. Digital is the same, except instead of being called grain the lack of detail looks more like noise.

As far as iso is concerned, set it manually to iso100 (lowest setting on the fz100) and leave it there till you practice enough to be confident about what your doing.

Your friends Canon 7d is a really good camera, but he will never be able to get the lens you have on your fz100 for it.
I hope this helps.
hi Jagsbch, thanks for some tips on how to get the best shot on the fz100....i just purchased this camera last week and have been playing around on how to get the best shots with this camera....i will definitely give your setting a try...=)
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Old Oct 12, 2010, 4:39 AM   #10
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I sent my FZ100 back for an exchange because it was not sharp. I have several Panasonics with leica lenses. I find Panasonic has a quality control problem. One I exchanged 4 times but the 4th one is great and very sharp. I am awaiting the new FZ100 and hope it is OK this time. A Leica lens should be sharp. I have several of them also. If you are having trouble, it may just be the camera. Exchange it if you can.
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