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Old Oct 9, 2010, 3:52 PM   #1
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Default Few macro shots FZ35

Not very good results... but here you go...
My problem is if I zoom more, it can't focus and I have to move back, if I don't zoom the subject is not close enough for a good macro.???
Thanks for CnC.
Bee n flower:


Wasps:



Wasps in ceiling:





Grasshopper:
Don't know how to get better macro like other users.

Last edited by Mystery123; Oct 9, 2010 at 4:11 PM.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 4:31 PM   #2
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Just curious but how are they not very good other than the fact that they need to be cropped a bit so other things don't divert attention from the main photo?
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 5:07 PM   #3
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I agree with Jyaku - these are not that bad, other than the subjects not quite being in the optimal position, but that's pure timing and patience. The third one is too noisy but I think that is due to very low light condition. I also agree with you that it's tricky to balance the zoom and distance. Also, I HAVE to brace my camera against something to get telemacro to come out well.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 5:11 PM   #4
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I agree - the shots look pretty good to me. When you use the telemacro you have to be a certain distance away to focus. If you want a closer shot you'll have to literally get closer. You just have to sneak up on them.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 5:21 PM   #5
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Thanks for comments.
What I was trying to get is a bokeh on some of the macro shots but may be that is only when bugs are on something high with far background.
Also, full 100% crop of the bugs is not large enough on the minimum focus distance.
It'd be better if the crop is big enough to fill the screen

Last edited by Mystery123; Oct 9, 2010 at 5:23 PM.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 6:14 PM   #6
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I always set the ISO to 100 or less when in macro and seem to do pretty well on bokeh (I just had to look up what that word means)
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 7:06 PM   #7
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Saly,
My understanding is ISO and bokeh are not related.
Aperture is the thingy that plays role for that.
When shooting bugs, there is just not enough time to play around to get best settings.
Here is 100% crop of the same hopper...

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Last edited by Mystery123; Oct 9, 2010 at 7:22 PM.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 7:28 PM   #8
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Well yes, but by setting the ISO low, and if the existing light is also fairly low, then the low ISO will force the aperture to open and/or slow the shutter speed. So the true way of getting the bokeh is to go aperture priority, but like you say, you don't always have the time to change all the settings. That's why I always have my ISO set low and hope for the best.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 8:44 PM   #9
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All the pictures look a little noisy on my screen. I do not play with ISO in day time. Though noisy, the first shot (flower and bee) and the third one are good. Probably you can do some PP to reduce noise.
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Old Oct 20, 2010, 10:35 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saly View Post
Well yes, but by setting the ISO low, and if the existing light is also fairly low, then the low ISO will force the aperture to open and/or slow the shutter speed. ...
The concept is correct. Usually the camera will open up the aperture as much as possible first before lowering the shutter speed. However, once the aperture is wide open, the camera will be forced to lower the shutter speed in order to accommodate the lack of light and low ISO settings once the aperture is at its widest value. This can cause a serious problem with blurriness due to camera shake.
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