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Old Dec 6, 2010, 5:23 PM   #11
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ah sarah joyce i think you may have just answered my question on why the above two phots have different colour tones? i had wondered why some of my photos came out really saturated while others where a lot lighter even though taken within minutes of eachother! so it is not alwats the best thing to have the camera on auto wb all the time and this is the next setting i should have a play around with to see the different results at different iso/shutter speeds/appertures to see what results i get? thanks for all your help people i have learnt so much in the last few days from this forum. great site! tom

ps.sarah joyce by generalization did you mean that the video described the principles for all types of cameras whereas my fz38 will have its own various tweaks and results on those principles etc. ?

Last edited by skowi; Dec 6, 2010 at 5:32 PM. Reason: missed a bit
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 5:26 PM   #12
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however i took took 2 shots of mr.duck from the same position with exactly the same settings/light etc and they turned out massively different? ill show the links below
http://lh5.ggpht.com/_dSd41qBxfTA/TP...0101206_73.JPG
http://lh4.ggpht.com/_dSd41qBxfTA/TP...0101206_72.JPG
is this all part of the photography fun? i mean i now know the effects shutter speed apperture and iso have on an shots so after a bit more playing around with these is the next step knowing how light will fall on the subject at various angles?
Actually, I can't see a "massive" difference, but exposure can change pretty drastically depending on what your camera is pointing at, particularly if your camera is set to point or center metering. Observe:

#1 I pointed the camera to the dark part of this bird's face, which over exposed the entire image because the camera "thought" the whole scene was dark.




#2 So I shifted the camera ever so slightly to point at the lighter part of his face....and got this. You see more details in his feathers now.



Pretty big difference without changing camera settings.
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 5:42 PM   #13
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that is a pretty big difference between the pictures... Was the lighting the same? both used flash? EDIT: saly seems to have covered this

The pictures look good enough, though with a small resolution like that it is hard to find the smaller problems

Practice makes perfect, hopefully the other members who are much better than me can give you extra pointers and find what exactly can be done to improve Mrs.Ducky's pictures

Imana do like you, find a subject and practice. btw, fun things to do to impress:

1- Put aperture between f4&5.6, put some insane fast shutter like 1/500, then move the camera wildly and take a picture, it will be completely still with no motion blur

2- MOST IMPRESSIVE--> Go in a very dark room, where the light is only making the room barely visible. Set a 2 sec timer (left button) to prevent any camera shaking. Set the camera on a table or something and put f2.8 and 60sec shutter speed (not 1/60). take the picture and make sure nothing moves and the lighting conditions stay the same. It will take 60 seconds for the picture to be taken, and 60 seconds for it to write on the memcard. The result is a very visible picture, from a completely dark room, people will be impressed!

3- show off the zoom. You can show off the 18x zoom, which is nice n all, but go in the menu and enable the digital zoom. 72x digital zoom, even if the picture doesn't look as good, is SUPER impressive. One thing I did was take the picture of a liscence plate from my window. the parked card was pretty far so the fact that I could show them the "saab" logo and the full liscence plate was a nice wow factor (make sure your shutter speed is fast and the lighting conditions are nice n bright)

Last edited by n-ster; Dec 6, 2010 at 5:44 PM.
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 5:47 PM   #14
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saly, i see what you mean, so you have show the camera exactly what you require of it, and focus the camera on the part you would like your image to be based on. rather than hoping the camera catches the correct exposure, even when you have all your settings correct. they sure are clever pieces of technology these cameras (and lots of fun)!
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 6:00 PM   #15
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yes n-ster i actually tried the digital zoom on this when i first got it and you can see really far even though the image is so poor it looks like its raining on the screen lol. and as for the dark room trick i saw a sample image from this camera where someone had set the shutter speed really, placed it on a tripod and then danced in front of it with a torch it was really creative and cool. and as for the really insane shutter speed perhaps this will get rid of my blurred images even more lol
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 8:16 PM   #16
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Oh common, digital zoom isn't that bad

http://img.techpowerup.org/101206/digitalzoom.jpg

SX30's zoom is WOW though lol http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnrpOzDTV-g

Last edited by n-ster; Dec 6, 2010 at 8:24 PM.
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 10:43 PM   #17
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By "generalization" I simply wanted to convey the fact that he covered a difficult topic with very little detail. I am a digital camera instructor, and I spend 3 class hours covering the same material with the appropriate sample photos.

Just defining the meaning of aperture, shutter speed and ISO give you precious little of the need detail.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 12:38 AM   #18
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By "generalization" I simply wanted to convey the fact that he covered a difficult topic with very little detail. I am a digital camera instructor, and I spend 3 class hours covering the same material with the appropriate sample photos.

Just defining the meaning of aperture, shutter speed and ISO give you precious little of the need detail.

Sarah Joyce
but he does explain the most important parts right? is there anything really important to a beginner photograph that we need to know that isn't in that video?
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 7:40 AM   #19
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n-ster-

Yes, there is a lot of hard and important information that is indeed missing. That You Tube video only offers definitions of Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO. You really need to know how to use those features, in detail, to get the most out of your camera on an everyday basis.

It is as if I told you the wheels on a car go round and round. You have no info about how those wheels are powered, and that the car has a reverse gear as well as forward gears. There is a lot of very practical information that is lacking.

Sarah Joyce
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