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Old Jan 8, 2011, 1:11 PM   #11
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geofftay-

I critically looked at both the FZ40 and the FZ100. After a lot of research, my conclusion was that the FZ100 would be too ISO limiting for me. Naturally, the FZ40 has some limitations as well, but those limitations are less important.

Therefore, I purchased the FZ40 (FZ45 in the UK) on 30 December 2010.With some experience under my belt, I feel that it was a good decision.

Sarah Joyce

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Old Jan 8, 2011, 7:13 PM   #12
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Thank you for that Sarah Joyce. With almost a 100 difference between the two cameras (the FZ100 being the most expensive) it has made the choice that bit easier...
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Old Jan 8, 2011, 9:17 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
You are off to a flying start, ancientritual-

Those three shots look very, very, good to me. What HDR software program did you use? we will look forward to seeing more photos from you.

Sarah Joyce
I use to HDR programs. Photomatix 4.0 and Dynamic Photo. Photomatix really enhances the noise, so I somtimes blend a Dynamic Photo HDR with Photomatix to control the noise. However the three shots above were all done in Photomatix with very little noise....
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Old Jan 9, 2011, 1:59 AM   #14
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If you shoot at f8 compared to f5.6 or f4 the f8 results will be softer. This is known as diffraction of light. Light passing through a small aperture. That combined with a small sensor and we are talking soft results.
Yeah, I don't think I was thinking very clearly when I posted. When I first got my fz40 I let the camera select the aperture (it tends to go with f2.8 for widest lens setting) and got disappointing landscapes so I started using f7.2 but I'm sure you're right - f4 sounds like the sweet spot.
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Old Jan 9, 2011, 8:29 AM   #15
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Very nice since i am a newbie still i need to ask how do you take the photos to compose a HDR one ? With bracketing ? or you just change the ev manually
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Old Jan 9, 2011, 10:30 AM   #16
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Ancientritual is very experienced with the HDR technique-

However, as I understand the procedure, a three shot HDR photo is best taken on a sturdy tripod, and then the EV is adjusted manually. There are also software programs that will produce a pseudo HDR image using just one image.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 9, 2011, 12:14 PM   #17
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Very nice photos!! You captured the approaching storm beautifully!

Congratulations on your new FZ!
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Old Jan 9, 2011, 1:17 PM   #18
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Nice. I will have to try those settings. Were these shot at ISO 80? Mine gets a bit blotchy at full resolution at that ISO.

Steve Spitzer
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Old Jan 9, 2011, 2:25 PM   #19
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You can shoot HDR material using the bracketing function in the camera set for exposure comp. I don't remember whether you can on the FZ series cameras, many you can control how much +/- you want the camera to shoot at in the three shots. +/- 1 is a good starting point. You can take more than just 3 shots, in fact, the more shots you take- like 5 or 6, the better results you'll get. A tripod is a good idea, but, for instance, Photomatix aligns minor misalignment.
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