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Old Jan 17, 2011, 12:52 PM   #1
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Default What did i do wrong? How can i improve?

Hi everyone - i went to Newmarket and took some horse photos with my FZ38.

Not very pleased i have to say but i need to learn where i went wrong with the photos.

Some are far too dark, some look grainy, some look too blurred, etc...

Light wasnt great as it had been raining but wasnt that dark by any means (was around mid-day).

Anyway, i have included the photos and their exif. data.




Shutter priority, ISO-400, 1/320, f/3.7.





Portrait mode, ISO-125, 1/13, f/3.2





Shutter priority, ISO-800, 1/320, f/4.4





Shutter priority, ISO-800, 1/320, f/4.4





Exposure mode Normal, ISO-800, 1/60, f/4.4.


Any help would be fantastic and thank you very much.

Last edited by Katchit; Jan 17, 2011 at 1:48 PM.
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Old Jan 17, 2011, 1:19 PM   #2
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Hi. I looked at the pics and mostly they're too dark. one at iso 800 (the last one ) looks ok. not good quality but exposed properly. Let's get back to them in order.
1. too dark. shutter priority forced a high shutter speed, the lens opened as much as it could but not enough.
2. horse's head moved. too slow a shutter speed.
3. dark, shutter speed high
4. dark, shutter speed high

I don't know the camera you're using and you may be asking for too much from it, but for sure, you need to expose better. Try this: when you start out, set your iso to 800, use aperture priority and set your lens not quite wide open, and take a few pics.

if the shutter speed shown is low, you'll get blur. no way around it. you could try setting your iso higher if you can or you could use the flash. Snap a few pics just to see the results. I do that in between actual shots all the time. It lets you keep an eye on the light changing.

Does this help? I know you were hoping for the magic answer. Maybe later.

edit: i just took a look at
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Pa...38/noise.shtml
and i think at iso 800 you're way beyond the capabilities of this camera. sorry. stick with sunny days and you'll be ok. dark, non-flash...not too good.

Last edited by frank-in-toronto; Jan 17, 2011 at 1:22 PM.
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Old Jan 17, 2011, 1:47 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
Hi. I looked at the pics and mostly they're too dark. one at iso 800 (the last one ) looks ok. not good quality but exposed properly. Let's get back to them in order.
1. too dark. shutter priority forced a high shutter speed, the lens opened as much as it could but not enough.
2. horse's head moved. too slow a shutter speed.
3. dark, shutter speed high
4. dark, shutter speed high

I don't know the camera you're using and you may be asking for too much from it, but for sure, you need to expose better. Try this: when you start out, set your iso to 800, use aperture priority and set your lens not quite wide open, and take a few pics.

if the shutter speed shown is low, you'll get blur. no way around it. you could try setting your iso higher if you can or you could use the flash. Snap a few pics just to see the results. I do that in between actual shots all the time. It lets you keep an eye on the light changing.

Does this help? I know you were hoping for the magic answer. Maybe later.

edit: i just took a look at
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Pa...38/noise.shtml
and i think at iso 800 you're way beyond the capabilities of this camera. sorry. stick with sunny days and you'll be ok. dark, non-flash...not too good.
Thank you very much for your critique, and thank you for the advice as to where i could change the settings!
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Old Jan 17, 2011, 2:00 PM   #4
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Ideally though, wait for the sun. The FZ38 is a small sensor camera and it needs lots of light to get good results of moving subjects. For still subjects, just use a tripod and a long shutter.

I think you might have got something more acceptable with a shutter speed of around 160 though - you seemed to be at the extremes of 1/320 and 1/13 on the ones you linked here.
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Old Jan 17, 2011, 3:35 PM   #5
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I'm very puzzled by this problem. Even on a cloudy day, you shouldn't have to go up to 800 ISO and still get these dark photos while outdoors. Here's a shot I took with my FZ35 (same as FZ38) on a very cloudy day after a rain. I'm shooting ISO 100 here. The shutter speed was 1/40, too slow for your action shots, but the brightness is comparable to your last shot which was taken at ISO 800 and shutter speed 1/60. Could you have bumped down the EV setting? What is your metering setting? If you are set on point meter, then it will be very sensitive to the color of the object you are pointed at.

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Old Jan 17, 2011, 5:12 PM   #6
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amazed ^^ amazing clarity how did u acomplish that ?
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Old Jan 17, 2011, 5:34 PM   #7
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more light.
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Old Jan 17, 2011, 5:53 PM   #8
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katchit-

I really think that Saly is right on track in solving this problem.

There is a possibility that there were some minus Exposure Compensation settings in place when you took those photos, forcing your camera to uniformly underexpose the photos.

I would do a camera reset to clear all current settings.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 18, 2011, 10:04 AM   #9
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Just wanted to say thank you for the advice and comments!

Much appreciated.
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Old Jan 18, 2011, 2:13 PM   #10
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if u try in manual mode, u may see the exposure bias bar in ur screen. try to do bias @ either 0 or -1/3 by adjusting iso/aperture/shutter speed. and you will be good.

note: you may want fast shutter speed if its a motion shot.
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