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Old Feb 12, 2011, 9:01 PM   #31
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Mark-

Shoturtle hit the most important point very nicely. You have to both learn and practice what you learn, until what you learn becomes second nature for you. There is lot of learning material available. Putting it into habitual practice is your goal.

Anytime you take a photo, you should consider the following issues, and make the necessary corrections:

Your lighting: Is it low level? That may take a numerical increase in your ISO setting. Avoid backlighting for now. keep the sun to the side of the photo (as in the blue pickup photo) or behind you, don't have it coming straight you. If your light level is really low as in the LX5 bar photo, that is the time to use the LX5's built-in flash unit, as long as the camera to subject distance (known as Flash Range) is less than 10 to 12 feet. So get so you automatically analyze the lighting that is contained within your proposed photo.

White Balance or WB: If you are out of doors in sunshine, the WB setting is set to Auto WB in normal sunshine. If you are on a bright beach, select Sunshine WB. If you have overcast skies, use Cloudy WB. If you are not going to use a flash, either the camera's built-in flash unit, a Slave Flash, or an External Flash, check to see if your camera has a Flash WB and set that. If you are taking an indoor photo, where fluorescent lighting will be the source of your lighting, then use Fluorescent WB, sometimes there are several kinds of Fluorescent WB, be sure to get the correct one. If you are taking an indoor photo, where light bulbs will be your light source, use Incandescent/Tungsten WB. You see, each one of these light sources provided a little different light spectrum. Therefore, these WB settings provide the necessary color spectrum corrections for each light source.

ISO Setting: As the light level (the volume and brightness of light) falls with your proposed photo, you may have to numerically increase the camera's ISO setting to keep the shutter speed of your camera high enough so that you can carefully hand hold the camera, and take the photo, without blurring, which is caused by slow shutter speed. For now, always use the "P" or Programed Auto Mode on your camera. Using that "P" Mode when you depress the shutter release half way to get the camera to properly focus, the camera will also display on the EVF or the LCD screen the proposed aperture and shutter speed that it will be using for the photo. To prevent photo blurring, you never want to let the shutter speed displayed to fall below 1/25th of a second. If you push the shutter release half way down and see 1/13th or 1/15th as the proposed shutter speed, you will have to numerically increase the ISO setting of your camera to increase that proposed shutter speed to 1/25th or more. Keep in mind that as you numerically increase the ISO setting, more visible noise (grain) will appear in your finished photo. Therefore, a good practice is (especially with the FZ100 camera) is to keep the ISO setting at and below ISO 400. You will get even better image quality if you can keep the numerical ISO setting at or below ISO 200 when possible.

Learn to crop your photo in the camera: Anytime you crop a finished photo you are cutting off and throwing away pixels from your actual photo. It is much better for you to learn to crop tighly right on the LCD screen or EVF, so that additional cropping is not required in post processing.

Learn to make use of Free Software: You can download either Picasa 3.0 or FastStone Image Viewer for free from www.google.com. Just go to google and type in "download Picasa 3.0" or "download FastStone Image Viewer." Picasa is easier and more intuitive to use. But these free programs will allow you to crop your images, resize your images, brighten and add contrast to your images and the like. Sometime a bit of post processing is all that is needed to make one of your photos look a whole lot better.

OK, this should get you started. I hope that I helped.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Feb 12, 2011, 9:04 PM   #32
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Joe Bananas-

I will give Arnold an extra fish for breakfast to thank him for posing.

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Old Feb 13, 2011, 5:35 PM   #33
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Sarah

As far as flash goes, I would think it would make a difference as far as ISO and flash are used together? or do you use the lowest ISO and let the flash supply the needed light?
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Old Feb 13, 2011, 5:41 PM   #34
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With a dslr, you can have the flash provide most of the lighting if you want to use a lower iso. But that will cause the flash to drain faster and longer full recycle. You can set the iso higher to let you get a faster shutter speed of 1/200 or 1/250 and the flash will give you a good 2-4 second burst rate before the capacitor needs a full recycle with a good off camera flash with a dslr.
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Old Feb 13, 2011, 5:59 PM   #35
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Quote:
I like your photos, especially #4. Im a sucker for snow shots, as Ive never seen snow myself.
Thanks Joe But I'm getting tired of the snow this year would love to get out in the sunshine above 30 degree's,
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Old Feb 13, 2011, 6:17 PM   #36
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Quote:
With a dslr, you can have the flash provide most of the lighting if you want to use a lower iso. But that will cause the flash to drain faster and longer full recycle. You can set the iso higher to let you get a faster shutter speed of 1/200 or 1/250 and the flash will give you a good 2-4 second burst rate before the capacitor needs a full recycle with a good off camera flash with a dslr.
Shoturtle
If I understand you right I can do the same with the FZ100 at ISO 100 with Bower external flash and set for 2 shot burst at 1/250 second shutter speed.
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Old Feb 13, 2011, 6:34 PM   #37
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Mark-

The recharge time of the external flash unit is dependent on the status of its batteries, and it may not be quick enough to provide sequesntial shooting.

On the built-in flash unit, exposure is based on ISO 100 at a Flash Range of 10 feet.

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Old Feb 14, 2011, 6:06 AM   #38
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@ Sarah
Thanks

@Mark
We'll have to swap houses then

And have you tried "Flash Burst" mode?

If your looking to take a quick series of photos using flash, this could be worth trying. It takes 5 shots in 1 second, the downside it it drops the megapixels down to 3.

Its in the "scene mode" menu.
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Old Feb 14, 2011, 7:04 AM   #39
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I think with all the point and shoot cameras you have, its time to graduate up to DSLR as long as your are not planning on doing underwater videography with it (auto focusing underwater is awful still on DSLR's).

A DSLR camera would compliment your other cameras pretty well.

Last edited by Chris0383; Feb 14, 2011 at 7:10 AM.
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Old Feb 14, 2011, 7:23 PM   #40
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Thank you all

Shoturtle : I think I missunderstood what you were telling me..I thought you were comparing the DSLR to the FZ100.

Joe I looked at that scene mode that you mentioned and that was also pretty impressive.

My question was not to clear either and I believe Sarah made the point. The incamera flash is based on ISO 100 at 10 feet. I should read the manual more before I put my foot in my mouth again. See chart below.

Thank You all for putting up with me.
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Last edited by popellis; Feb 14, 2011 at 7:25 PM. Reason: No Chart
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