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Old Jan 7, 2004, 11:50 AM   #11
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The alignment procedure uses a focus chart and a built in calibration system. This sets depth of field and back focus at the same time. Obviously there has to be some distance value, but since the procedure is automated the "number" you request is unknown. Also, the distance at which objects are in focus will be influenced by the depth of field which as we know varies with illumination. Since the alignment can't be changed, these preset points are basically fixed.
Bob, I fear that there is some misunderstanding here because I cannot see how that answers my question. I will assume that I didn't phrase it correctly and will try to be more precise.

When you aim the camera at a scene that lacks enough details for it to autofocus, it tries to and fails (the green light blinking).

However, the lens is in a position that, although no focus has been obtained, items at some distance would be in focus.

As an example, consider a camera with manual focusing. If you randomly turn the focusing ring this way and that, you have not focused on anything particular. However, the lens is left in a position where it is focused on some distance.

Now the question is, after the FZ1 has failed to obtain focus, what is it focused on? The nearest position? The most distant position (infinity or "beyond infinity")? Some random position?

Again, I am asking about the situation when the AF either failed or wasn't engaged at all (on power-up).

Thank you,
Alex.
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Old Jan 7, 2004, 11:52 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Panasonic
I noticed at Panasonic's website the NA, FZ1 contains the same manual features of the FZ2. Can anyone tell me when it was upgraded?

<RESPONSE>
Panasonic in Japan released firmware that updates the FZ1 to most of the features ofthe FZ2. "Most" as in what could be offered by way of a firmware update. Here in the U.S. the firmware was not released, nor is there any definite decision if we will.

We are aware that the firmware was posted on several websites and U.S. customer's have installed it.

At this time I'm not permitted to comment on this issue, though I will say that doing so may void the warranty.
I believe that the question addressed the fact that there are several typos on the datasheets on the Panasonic US web site.

Somebody posted (on Phil's) that he emailed Panasonic and they acknowledged the problem.
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Old Jan 7, 2004, 3:50 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Panasonic
The alignment procedure uses a focus chart and a built in calibration system. This sets depth of field and back focus at the same time. Obviously there has to be some distance value, but since the procedure is automated the "number" you request is unknown. Also, the distance at which objects are in focus will be influenced by the depth of field which as we know varies with illumination. Since the alignment can't be changed, these preset points are basically fixed.
Bob, I fear that there is some misunderstanding here because I cannot see how that answers my question. I will assume that I didn't phrase it correctly and will try to be more precise.

When you aim the camera at a scene that lacks enough details for it to autofocus, it tries to and fails (the green light blinking).

However, the lens is in a position that, although no focus has been obtained, items at some distance would be in focus.

As an example, consider a camera with manual focusing. If you randomly turn the focusing ring this way and that, you have not focused on anything particular. However, the lens is left in a position where it is focused on some distance.

Now the question is, after the FZ1 has failed to obtain focus, what is it focused on? The nearest position? The most distant position (infinity or "beyond infinity")? Some random position?

Again, I am asking about the situation when the AF either failed or wasn't engaged at all (on power-up).

Thank you,
Alex.
Informal testing suggests that the FZ1 is indeed focused on infinity (or close to it) when it fails to obtain focus lock.

Please comment.
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Old Jan 8, 2004, 8:13 AM   #14
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Default 3rd Question: Exposure compensation

Next question:

Does the Exposure Compensation adjust the aperture, the shutter speed or one in preference to the other?

Does it depend on the shooting mode or maybe the lighting conditions?

I assume that in the FZ10, the exposure compensation will adjust the shutter speed in the AP mode and the aperture in the SP mode.

What happens in the automatic modes of the FZ1 (and the FZ10)?

Thank you,
Alex.
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Old Jan 9, 2004, 8:46 AM   #15
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Bob, I fear that there is some misunderstanding here because I cannot see how that answers my question. I will assume that I didn't phrase it correctly and will try to be more precise.
When you aim the camera at a scene that lacks enough details for it to autofocus, it tries to and fails (the green light blinking).
However, the lens is in a position that, although no focus has been obtained, items at some distance would be in focus.
Now the question is, after the FZ1 has failed to obtain focus, what is it focused on? The nearest position? The most distant position (infinity or "beyond infinity")? Some random position?


Ah, OK now I see your point.
1. I don't believe there is any fixed point at which it's "reset". I'll ask but understanding ow the system works I suspect that my preliminary conclusion will be correct.

2. When the blinking green light situation occurs, that's a warning that it "may not" be in proper focus. I've had many situations when this condition was forced and the images were in pefect focus. Often, shifting the camera a few degrees will change the scene content and the area that's being focused and it works just fine.
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Old Jan 9, 2004, 8:57 AM   #16
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Default Re: 3rd Question: Exposure compensation

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexo
Next question:

Does the Exposure Compensation adjust the aperture, the shutter speed or one in preference to the other?
Does it depend on the shooting mode or maybe the lighting conditions?
I assume that in the FZ10, the exposure compensation will adjust the shutter speed in the AP mode and the aperture in the SP mode.
Let me lump this all together.
The selected ISO setting and the amount of light will be the two largest factors. The camera's logic has an "ideal" range it tries to maintain, This takes into account using a shutter speed that the average person can use and maintaining a modeate depth of field.
Exposure compensation woiuld not intentionally select a slow shutter speed to improve the brightness. This is where "fuzzy logic" takes over. The idea of an advanced users guide is nice, but it's not something the majority of the users would understand. In fact, such in-depth material can confuse the user and create support nightmares. Understand that the dozen or so people in tis discussion do not represent the "average" user. The goal of the manual is to instruct the user on basic operation. It is not intended to be a tutorial on operation theory. Personally I'd like that but I don't see that happening.
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Old Jan 9, 2004, 9:27 AM   #17
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Default Re: 3rd Question: Exposure compensation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Panasonic
The idea of an advanced users guide is nice, but it's not something the majority of the users would understand. In fact, such in-depth material can confuse the user and create support nightmares. Understand that the dozen or so people in tis discussion do not represent the "average" user. The goal of the manual is to instruct the user on basic operation. It is not intended to be a tutorial on operation theory. Personally I'd like that but I don't see that happening.
Bob, when I bought my car, I got an owner's manual with it. However, I can order more advanced material from the manufacturer. If I can buy a book that will tell me how to put my car apart and back together, why should it be impossible to buy one that will help me get the most of my camera?

I am not suggesting that Panasonic replace the current user manual, nor that you add too-technical details to it. I am saying that having the possibility to obtain more in-depth documentation will be beneficial.

I am pretty sure that there will be a market for that kind of literature. In fact, there are already attempts to fill this niche (although, I understand, lacking in quality).

Back to work. Will play with the camera some more later...
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Old Jan 9, 2004, 12:41 PM   #18
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Bob,

I recently purchased the DMC-FZ10K and love it. I am looking for the Panasonic bag that will fit it. I was told the DMW-CZS10 is the one that fits this. Where and how can I get one of these?

Thanks,
Kevan
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 8:53 AM   #19
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Default Re: 3rd Question: Exposure compensation

[quote="alexo"][quote="Panasonic"]

Bob, when I bought my car, I got an owner's manual with it. However, I can order more advanced material from the manufacturer. If I can buy a book that will tell me how to put my car apart and back together, why should it be impossible to buy one that will help me get the most of my camera?

I am not suggesting that Panasonic replace the current user manual, nor that you add too-technical details to it. I am saying that having the possibility to obtain more in-depth documentation will be beneficial.

The automobile industry offers "shop manuals" for those people who do their own repairs and for independent service centers. Panasonic offers service manuals which serve the same purpose. They do not include the theory of operation. I hae several O.I.'s from the other DSC manufacturers and none of them offer the type of info you request, nor to the best of my knowledge are they offered.

Given the current schedule, development time and cost just isn't possible for what would probably result in < 100 copies. As I have explained many times, marketing is about dollars and cents. It's about products that generate revenue. That, combined with the average time a model is actually n the market does litlle to motivate even the third party developers.
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 8:55 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by riesek
Bob,

I recently purchased the DMC-FZ10K and love it. I am looking for the Panasonic bag that will fit it. I was told the DMW-CZS10 is the one that fits this. Where and how can I get one of these?

Thanks,
Kevan
Kevan,
I believe it's being offered in Japan but the last time I looked we are not offering it in the U.S. I went to Circuit City and purchased a generic case that I found to be very nice. It's durable aand water resistant so it also offers an added degress of protection.
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