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Old Jan 30, 2004, 12:35 AM   #21
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Default Re: landscape focus, white balance

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Originally Posted by Charlie Howard
To manually focus at "Infinity", push the Focus lever all the way down while pointing at a distant object, and let the camera try to auto-focus, then release the lever and leave it in the MF position. Then, you can try to fine-tune by SLOWLY turning the focus ring just a little bit. It is very sensitive, and when turned SLOWLY, goes from "past infinity" (counter-clockwise) to "closest" (clockwise) in less than 1/4 turn. If you turn it too far counter-clockwise, it actually goes past infinity (but will not show you what lies beyond the universe) and nothing will be in focus. So, you can also deliberately turn it too far counter-clockwise and then bring it back just a little bit. But, it's best to focus on a distant object.
There's a way to manually set the FZ1's focus to infinity by not allowing it to achieve a focus lock (details in the FZ1 FAQ).
I wonder if that will work with the FZ10 as well. Or will it focus on Buzz Lightyear instead?

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There are only two ways to change White Balance: the WB menu and the up-arrow temperature adjuster.
My youngest has a fever. Why don't children come with an up-arrow temperature adjuster?
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Old Jan 30, 2004, 12:07 PM   #22
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Default Re: landscape focus, white balance

Hi Alexo,

Leaving the lens cap on while pressing the MF Assist button also seems to set the FZ10 to 'infinity' focus, but I'm not sure whether it'll always do that.

Kids don't have hot buttons; they just press the ones on their parents.
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Old Jan 30, 2004, 12:13 PM   #23
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Manually setting the WB has no bearing on the auto WB, does it?
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Old Jan 30, 2004, 3:12 PM   #24
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Default Re: manual vs auto white balance

Aviller said:
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Manually setting the WB has no bearing on the auto WB, does it?
That's right. And the camera "remembers" each of the non-auto WB settings separately, not just the fully manual one. But, the fully manual one is the most accurate.
One of the [many] nice things about the FZ10 is that the preview through the viewfinder usually shows you how the picture will actually look. That's especially true for white balance. If you can look through the EVF with your right eye while looking at the actual scene with your left eye, and see a color cast in the EVF, it means the WB is incorrect. The easiest way to demonstrate this to yourself is to try it with indoor lighting while WB is set to Auto: through the EVF, the room will look yellow-orange, as compared with what your other eye is seeing.
Switching the WB to the light bulb icon may change the color cast, but if it doesn't make the overall hue match the actual scene, you can either use the up-arrow to get to the red-blue adjuster and move it towards blue, or use manual WB while pointing at a white wall/ceiling (or cover the lens with a Pringles or yogurt lid), then press the shutter to let the camera set the manual WB.
After you do that, the view through the EVF should suddenly lose the color cast and look just like the real room.
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Old Jan 30, 2004, 5:56 PM   #25
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Manual WB really works great. The orangeish hue in indoor shots has entirely disappeared. What would you recommend for outdoor shots? Stay with auto or use manual? Auto seems to work just fine for my architecture pics.
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Old Jan 30, 2004, 11:00 PM   #26
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Default Re: outdoor WB

I had made some comments on Outdoor White Balance in my previous post, and then deleted them to save space.
The benefits of using manual WB indoors are pretty dramatic, but for outdoors, it seems to depend on the conditions. So, these are just my opinions and personal preferences...

1) from two hours after sunrise until two hours before sunset: use Auto WB in good sunlight or light shade, or use the 'sunlight' setting, which is what I think Auto WB winds up using;

2) overcast: use the "cloudy" setting or do a manual WB (I use a Pringles lid glued into a hollow lens cap, as described at http://www.imagestation.com/album/?i...58&mode=invite ). I point it at the sky and like the results better than using the 'cloudy' or 'Auto' settings. That is not the same thing as saying the results are better; just more to my liking.

3) medium to heavy fog: nothing has worked for me, and any suggestions will be very much appreciated (we get LOTS of fog here);

4) sunrise/sunset (first/last 1-2 hours of daylight): the actual WB is changing very quickly during that time, and, combined with the long shadows, often give the most interesting lighting of all. I like to "help" nature a bit by emphasizing the reds, so I put the Menu's WB in one of the non-auto positions (such as the light bulb, whose default values are useless to me), exit the Menu, then use the up-arrow to get to the WB Adjust, and push the balance towards red on the left. This can boost the reds and oranges, but won't create them where they don't exist (you can exaggerate, but not lie). In this album http://www.imagestation.com/album/?i...93&mode=invite
the third and fourth pictures are of a nice sunset, while the fifth is of the sunrise the next morning.

By the time I bought the FZ10, I had a pretty long list of specific things that were important to me... things that didn't work properly or well enough on other cameras. One of them was being able to take panoramas of sunsets. Other cameras that lacked true Manual WB would change the WB from one overlapping frame to the next, so the overlapping areas had different hues as well as different exposures. That made it impossible to stitch the frames together seamlessly.

By putting the FZ10 into all-manual mode (focus, f/stop, shutter, ISO, and white balance), I was able to get precisely the results I wanted: the overlapping areas of successive frames were identical. With the camera on a tripod and the pictures taken just a couple of seconds apart, they blended together perfectly. (The stitching software was Ulead's COOL 360.)
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 10:21 AM   #27
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Thanks for the advice. You use PhotoImpact? Do you happen to know a site which provides some help. I have the German version and the manual is pretty much useless (not because of the language but because of the advice given).
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 5:49 PM   #28
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Default Re: Photo Impact -- no, I've never used it; sorry (nt)

I've never used Photo Impact.
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