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Old Nov 18, 2011, 9:43 PM   #1
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Default What does Wind Cut actually do?

I've read in the manual that the Wind Cut reduces wind noise (obviously ). I took a video on a windy day with it on but didn't take one with it off on the same day. In the manual it says the audio will be different than with it off. I've always wondered how it sounds different, so I did a little experiment. I just took two videos that were the same in as controlled an environment as I could make it. The video with Wind Cut off sounds rich and much better. With Wind Cut on the video sounds like it is mono instead of stereo. I took the videos in P mode using the AVCHD Lite format and the L recording quality. This has me wondering what Wind Cut actually does? To me all it sounds like is it records in mono instead of stereo.
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Old Nov 19, 2011, 11:03 AM   #2
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I don't do much video but I never thought twice about turning this feature ON as wind noise can interfere quite significantly with all surrounding sounds and if you are taping people talking at you or kids playing, you might not be able to understand what they are saying if it's very windy. I would not care much about the stereo effect as long as the audio quality with Wind Cut ON is good (is it?). Talking about stereo, I don't believe the stereo effect is that evident when the mics are placed 1/8th of an inch from each other (as they are on most digital cameras that offer stereo video recording). I find the stereo effect to be nothing but sounds coming from left and right channels mixed together rather than from just one channel as with mono recordings.
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Old Nov 20, 2011, 3:53 PM   #3
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I think wind cut is a filer that tries to remove wind noise

The Panasonic fz40/45 uses Dolby Digital stereo creator to process the captured sound.

@Tullio, not splitting hairs, but I thought the 'stereo effect' was sounds coming from left and right channels via say loud speakers with the sound waves combining and fooling the ears into placing the sound somewhere between the two speakers.
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Old Nov 21, 2011, 1:41 PM   #4
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Yes, stereo is the effect you get when you separate sounds between two channels (say for example voice on the left, guitar on the right, etc.). However, to record in stereo you must place at least two microphones at different locations. If you only use one mic, then all sounds will come through one channel. You can make them play on two speakers but with no channel separation. Although some digital cameras have two mics, because they positioned just about next to each other, you do get a two-channel sound recording but you can't really separate the sounds bewteen the two.

This is from Wikipedia...

In technical usage, true stereo means sound recording and sound reproduction that uses stereographic projection to encode the relative positions of objects and events recorded.

During two-channel stereo recording, two microphones are placed in strategically chosen locations relative to the sound source, with both recording simultaneously. The two recorded channels will be similar, but each will have distinct time-of-arrival and sound-pressure-level information. During playback, the listener's brain uses those subtle differences in timing and sound level to triangulate the positions of the recorded objects. Stereo recordings often cannot be played on monaural systems without a significant loss of fidelity. Since each microphone records each wavefront at a slightly different time, the wavefronts are out of phase; as a result, constructive and destructive interference can occur if both tracks are played back on the same speaker. This phenomenon is known as phase cancellation.
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