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Old Oct 10, 2012, 7:29 PM   #1
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Default New Fz100 owner looking for the best Generic setting?

Hi All,

I'm a "newbie" on here and I have been sifting my way through the last 100 or so posts....phewwww, but truly great stuff, now on to my quiry -
My fave use of this fine camera is nautical(ships and the like) and aerial plane photography of mainly airliners flying at a few miles up, I am still getting to grips with the Fz100, after moving over from the Canon stable with my old SX10IS, I have so far set my Fz up In the following settings to hopefully get the best IQ out of the camera -

AP Mode,
Standard Film Setting(Contrast +1, Satuartion -1, Sharp +1, Noise -2),
Dynamic Colour Setting,
Auto ISO(Clipped at 200),
Centre Point AF(Small AF Frame or next size up),
Anti-shake num 2 Setting(Just when the shutter is pressed).

Any additional help or tips to get the best IQ with my chosen subject, would be realy great.

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Old Oct 11, 2012, 10:02 AM   #2
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Capping the ISO at 200 means your camera will choose wider apertures and/or slower shutter speeds when light is not as good, particularly when zooming in. Both settings can have a negative effect on IQ. Shooting wide open usually yields to soft images and slow shutter speeds will result in blur due to camera shake when using long FL (unless of course you have it on a tripod). I'd keep saturation at zero to begin with. Unlike other brands such as Canon or Olympus, Panasonic tends to produce less punchy images in terms of color so lowering saturation may produce images that lack in color. Lastly, you might want to increase contrast all the way if you expect to shoot at the long range of the zoom as images tend to loose contrast the more you zoom in. All that of course is just my opinion.
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Old Oct 11, 2012, 4:21 PM   #3
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Capping the ISO at 200 means your camera will choose wider apertures and/or slower shutter speeds when light is not as good, particularly when zooming in. Both settings can have a negative effect on IQ. Shooting wide open usually yields to soft images and slow shutter speeds will result in blur due to camera shake when using long FL (unless of course you have it on a tripod). I'd keep saturation at zero to begin with. Unlike other brands such as Canon or Olympus, Panasonic tends to produce less punchy images in terms of color so lowering saturation may produce images that lack in color. Lastly, you might want to increase contrast all the way if you expect to shoot at the long range of the zoom as images tend to loose contrast the more you zoom in. All that of course is just my opinion.

Thanks for that, I am trying to find the ultimate settings for the camera, after that I do my own PP as I love this stage, I use Windows Live Photo to do the Initial alterations - size, perspective and High/Low lights, then I open Neat Image and do some Noise reduction, and zoom In to check the change, then I do the final changes In Serif Photoplus Including color changes/bias, and color/contrast, then finish with sharpening the Image In USM and possibly some Edge sharpening, then I save the new Image so I can compare both Images.
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Old Oct 11, 2012, 4:42 PM   #4
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G'day Pm

Adding to Tullio ... I would set ISO to (auto-800) and use Program mode for day-to-day stuff. The camera will perform quite adequately up to iso-800, Program will allow it to meander up thru the shutter / aperture range easily so those long-zoom shots will be using fast shutter speeds as well

I don't know anything about your pp software, but if you are using multiple programs it seems to me that you're making life a bit hard on yourself. I just use Elements and it does everything I want / need

Regards, Phil
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Old Oct 11, 2012, 4:56 PM   #5
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G'day Pm

Adding to Tullio ... I would set ISO to (auto-800) and use Program mode for day-to-day stuff. The camera will perform quite adequately up to iso-800, Program will allow it to meander up thru the shutter / aperture range easily so those long-zoom shots will be using fast shutter speeds as well

I don't know anything about your pp software, but if you are using multiple programs it seems to me that you're making life a bit hard on yourself. I just use Elements and it does everything I want / need

Regards, Phil

Hi Phil, thanks for your Imput, I tend to use the 3 cuz of their Individual strengths, windows Is my host photo site and has a few very very un-complicated settings for cropping, high/low light adjustments, then Serif is alot like Elements, Gimp etc and I find Its control over color/saturation and sharpness very easy to use(Im not Into doing all that masks stuff etc) and I find a stand alone noise reduction like Neat very reliable and allows some very fine adjustment.
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Old Oct 11, 2012, 6:21 PM   #6
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... I use Windows Live Photo to do the Initial alterations - size, perspective and High/Low lights, then I open Neat Image and do some Noise reduction, and zoom In to check the change, then I do the final changes In Serif Photoplus Including color changes/bias, and color/contrast, then finish with sharpening the Image In USM and possibly some Edge sharpening, ...
Wow...I'm looking forward to seeing some of your pictures. I've no patience (or time) to post process my pictures to this extent, reason why I like cameras that produce good JPEGs.
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Old Oct 12, 2012, 2:52 PM   #7
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Given that your favourite subjects- boats and planes- will be shot at some distance- their apparent speed will be slow, thus high shutter speeds will not necessarily be a huge issue- other than staying within image stabilizer boundaries... and even sharpness/saturation/noise reduction etc can be adjusted to some degree after the event.
I would be more focused (lol...) on choice of metering as your backgrounds will be quite different from your subjects,potentially creating a difficult exposure.
Spot metering for the subject would be most peoples choice- or as I do,use multi-metering and adjust exposure comp' accordingly- though this method requires a touch of experience to obtain a high hit rate.
I would also choose the continuous stabiliser option as composition will be easier with a steady image prior to shooting- especially at the long end of the zoom.
Also- as boats tend to be in the sea- and planes in the air- multi area AF would probably be the way to go as their is little else to mis-focus against- and even if you move from the center with an untimely wobble, it will have no ill effect and still focus fine.
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Old Oct 12, 2012, 4:56 PM   #8
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High shutter speed is not used only to freeze objects in motion. When shooting with long zooms, the rule-of-thumb is to set the camera to 1/FL to avoid blur caused by camera shake. Shooting at 500+mm with a slow shutter speed, you may get blurred images caused by camera shake even if the object is still. There's just so much that IS can do.
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Old Oct 12, 2012, 5:26 PM   #9
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I was/am thinking about the focusing abilities at full zoom of thease fine Fz's as I find the Fz100 realy struggles to find let alone focus on a very small plane In the sky or cloud formations, and I find the manual focus abit awkward In finding acurate Infinity, and trying to do this while following a plane across the sky normaly leeds to an out of focus plane, I've tried altering the focus bracket size during this but It all takes time and I miss my object cuz Its long gone.
Also with such a small object that you can hardly see, Its hard to tell If Its In focus or not, only when downloaded on pc and zoomed to 100percent can I see the sucesess of fail of my plane photo, this has always been a problem for me - no matter what bridge camera I have owned, and many have said to me that I am trying to achieve miracles from such a small sensor camera, but any tips I would love to hear.

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Old Oct 12, 2012, 6:52 PM   #10
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Tullio- you may or may not have noticed the line...
"....other than staying within image stabiliser boundaries...."
In other words- so long as you have enough shutter speed to keep things still...
Hand-holding an FZ-100/150 at the 600mm setting is pretty darn easy from 1/60th sec and upwards- and to be honest,I can go even slower than that with a high hit rate.
Therefore,biasing settings for correct exposure should be the priority here as opposed to speed- as more than enough shutter speed will be available for a steady hand-hold and a fairly slow moving subject.

Paganman2011- the problem with images such as the one displayed here is that with such a small subject and with such a long distance involved,the contrast detection AF will struggle to find a sharp,defined edge- because there isn't one- the camera not only magnifies the subject,it also magnifies any haze and such like- softening any defined edges. You might not see it with the naked eye- but I can assure you that the plane you're looking at is ill defined even with the naked eye- it's just too small for you to see it.
That said- keep persisting with it...

Last edited by SIMON40; Oct 12, 2012 at 6:58 PM.
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