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Old Aug 22, 2013, 1:18 PM   #1
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Default Panasonic ZS7/TZ10 Optimal Settings

Hi all,
I registered on this website purposely to know if anyone could help me with this camera.

So I bought a TZ10 and I would like to get the optimal settings (indoor, outdoor and nitgh photos)

I'm a little disappointed with my photos, they are too grainy and blurry (all in iA mode) because i don't have
enough knowledge to know which are the best modes (iA, P.A.S.M.) and settings for each situation!

For those of you who have used the TZ10, could you recommend a few settings to work around?
First I understand manual mode (maybe custom's with right settings?) is the way to go.
Any other settings worth mentioning? What about A and S modes? Aperture and shutter speed priority, have you tried them as well as manual mode?
ISO sensitivity, Aspect Ratio? will these affect picture taking or only editing afterwards?

Perhaps with your recommendations I can create 3 profiles:
Cust-1 = Good light outdoor settings
Cust-2 = Low light outdoor settings
Cust-3 = Indoor/Night settings

Please if anyone can indicate me the settings please not abbreviate technical terms, because I'm Portuguese and maybe I can't understand...

Thanks everyone
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Old Aug 22, 2013, 2:11 PM   #2
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iA should be fine for outdoor use in good light and providing you aren't shooting fast moving subjects- whereby using "S" shutter priority might be the way to go with a shutter speed of 1/400th sec upwards... use auto iso here (if I remember correctly on the TZ10,goes up to iso 400 in auto iso).
Low light/outdoor and indoor/night settings are tricky- ok if your subjects are stationary- you can use "M" manual mode (with a tripod) and use longer exposures with a low iso setting for best quality. Higher iso settings will give you more shutter speed,but with a reduction in overall image quality at every increase.

Aspect ratio makes no difference to image quality- only the image format- 16/9 will fit your modern widescreen TV, 4/3 will be like your old TV format, where 3/2 is like most DSLR's....
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Old Aug 22, 2013, 5:55 PM   #3
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After much research I found this thread and maybe the settings from user interfreak be a good place to start...

I have also seen some photos from user LTZ40 with this camera, and I would like to get his advices/settings here
Oh and of course I would like to thank you for your wise advice SIMON40.

Some more tips and advices are welcome
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Old Sep 12, 2013, 7:43 AM   #4
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261 views and just 1 reply? I'm a little disappointed...
Thanks to you SIMON!
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Old Sep 12, 2013, 2:17 PM   #5
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Perhaps there aren't many TZ10 users left...?
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Old Sep 28, 2013, 1:22 PM   #6
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[QUOTE=boyka;1357450]261 views and just 1 reply? I'm a little disappointed...


OK. A reply: I can help you.

The worst thing about any small-sensor camera is DIFFRACTION - the physical aperture is small enough that diffraction is always a problem.

So, you want the aperture to be a large as possible, reducing the diffraction effects as much as possible.

SO: always use the camera in "A" (aperture) mode, and set the aperture to it's widest setting, ƒ3.3, and leave the ISO at 100.

The widest setting gives the sharpest picture the camera is capable of (test it yourself - shoot a scene at ƒ3.3, ƒ4.5 & ƒ8 and examine the results) - particularly in grass & foliage, the ƒ8 really is bad!

Typically, in bright conditions, in "A" mode, the camera will then select 1/1,000th second or more - and what's not to like about that? Helps to stop subject movement, and in poor light the widest aperture is also hat you want - but you may have to go up to higher ISO.

Try it, you'll like it. It's pretty technical - should you want to hear more of the science of it, I can supply that, but you don't really need to know it.

And - don't worry about DOF!!! The short-focal length lens has HUGE DOF all by itself - using aperture to "control DOF" is for much larger sensor/longer focal length lenses. 99% of what you read about aperture is the mistaken idea that ƒ-stops are all about DOF, most pundits have no clue that in small sensor/short focal length cameras, it's about diffraction.

-Erik

Last edited by Ohlsonmh; Sep 28, 2013 at 1:26 PM.
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Old Sep 28, 2013, 1:35 PM   #7
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[/QUOTE] using aperture to "control DOF" is for much larger sensor/longer focal length lenses. 99% of what you read about aperture is the mistaken idea that -stops are all about DOF, most pundits have no clue that in small sensor/short focal length cameras, it's about diffraction.
-Erik[/QUOTE]

Thanks Erik for this info.
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Old Sep 28, 2013, 7:02 PM   #8
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[QUOTE=Ohlsonmh;1358629]
Quote:
Originally Posted by boyka View Post
261 views and just 1 reply? I'm a little disappointed...


OK. A reply: I can help you.

The worst thing about any small-sensor camera is DIFFRACTION - the physical aperture is small enough that diffraction is always a problem.

So, you want the aperture to be a large as possible, reducing the diffraction effects as much as possible.

SO: always use the camera in "A" (aperture) mode, and set the aperture to it's widest setting, ƒ3.3, and leave the ISO at 100.

The widest setting gives the sharpest picture the camera is capable of (test it yourself - shoot a scene at ƒ3.3, ƒ4.5 & ƒ8 and examine the results) - particularly in grass & foliage, the ƒ8 really is bad!

Typically, in bright conditions, in "A" mode, the camera will then select 1/1,000th second or more - and what's not to like about that? Helps to stop subject movement, and in poor light the widest aperture is also hat you want - but you may have to go up to higher ISO.

Try it, you'll like it. It's pretty technical - should you want to hear more of the science of it, I can supply that, but you don't really need to know it.

And - don't worry about DOF!!! The short-focal length lens has HUGE DOF all by itself - using aperture to "control DOF" is for much larger sensor/longer focal length lenses. 99% of what you read about aperture is the mistaken idea that ƒ-stops are all about DOF, most pundits have no clue that in small sensor/short focal length cameras, it's about diffraction.

-Erik
I am very gratified for your help Ohlsonmh, however I did not realize some things ... (maybe because I'm Portuguese)

But from what I realized ...
1- What you intend to say is, always use the camera in "A" (aperture) mode, letting the ISO at 100, and set the aperture to it's highest setting, right?
2- The minimum aperture value of my camera (TZ10) is ƒ3.3 and the maximum value is ƒ6.3, then I must choose ƒ6.3, and so with a highet value gives me a sharpest picture, right?
3- On the other hand in low light conditions I should use these same settings but I must go with a higher ISO (maybe ISO400), right?
4- One last question, I read somewhere that if I select 8MP instead of 12MP, gives me the sharpest picture and less grain/blurry, this statement is correct?

PS: I honestly did not understand the last paragraph from your post, because I really don't know what the DOF means!
Please try not abrevies technical terms because I'm Portuguese and then I can not understand... Again, thanks for your help.

Last edited by boyka; Sep 29, 2013 at 12:24 PM.
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Old Sep 29, 2013, 3:15 PM   #9
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[QUOTE=boyka;1358650]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohlsonmh View Post

I am very gratified for your help Ohlsonmh, however I did not realize some things ... (maybe because I'm Portuguese)

But from what I realized ...
1- What you intend to say is, always use the camera in "A" (aperture) mode, letting the ISO at 100, and set the aperture to it's highest setting, right?

Yes. I use my camera (presently a Panasonic ZS25) 99% of the time in "A" Mode, aperture at it's widest setting, which is ƒ3.3.

2- The minimum aperture value of my camera (TZ10) is ƒ3.3 and the maximum value is ƒ6.3, then I must choose ƒ6.3, and so with a highest value gives me a sharpest picture, right?

NO. The aperture numbers are very confusing: The lens aperture is usually specified as an ƒ-number, which is the Focal Length of the lens divided by the aperture's diameter, so the LARGER the actual "hole", the smaller the ƒ-number.

So you should shoot at ƒ3.3 as much as possible: this gives the sharpest image the camera is capable of, ƒ6.3 will not be as sharp.

3- On the other hand in low light conditions I should use these same settings but I must go with a higher ISO (maybe ISO400), right?

YES. In low light, you still want the widest opening to let in as much light as possible - ƒ3.3, but if the shutter speed is then too slow, the only thing possible is to use a higher ISO.

4- One last question, I read somewhere that if I select 8MP instead of 12MP, gives me the sharpest picture and less grain/blurry, this statement is correct?

I'm sorry - I have read things like that, too, but I have never tested it, so I can't be sure.

PS: I honestly did not understand the last paragraph from your post, because I really don't know what the DOF means!

"DOF" Means "Depth Of Focus" - the distance in front of, and in back of the object you are focusing on, which still looks "sharp". With a long focal-length lens the background behind a person you are photographing will be quite "soft" (and people call this "Bokeh") but with a really short focal length, this effect shows up much less.

Try this: focus on a flower a meter or so away from your camera, and take a picture at the "wide angle" setting, then zoom all the way to the longest "telephoto" setting and shoot it again - at the telephoto setting the background will be much less "in focus".

Please try not abrevies technical terms because I'm Portuguese and then I can not understand... Again, thanks for your help.
My answers are after each question in your quote, above, starting with the bold words.

So sorry about the language problem
!! I hope I may have been more clear this time.

You can look up the confusing terms on Wikipedia in your language, but be aware that most of the "experts" are writing about large-sensor cameras and they don't know (or at least don't mention) diffraction's effects on small sensor cameras.

-Erik

Last edited by Ohlsonmh; Sep 29, 2013 at 3:25 PM. Reason: To clarify statements.
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Old Oct 8, 2013, 5:22 AM   #10
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Default TZ10 settings.

I find A mode, minus 1/3 ev. aperture 3;3, 100 ISO for most situations, I never use IA. I do think that supporting the camera on a wall or bean bag is important for getting sharp images.
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