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Old Mar 27, 2004, 12:43 AM   #1
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Default What polarizing filter for FZ-10

Linear or circular?
I photograph mostly landscapes and wildlife, should I use a polarizing filter all the time or not as I want to use the filter to protect the lens as well.
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 7:43 PM   #2
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A polarizing filter creates special effects which may not be suitable for what you need. If you are looking only for a way to protect the underlying lens, I would recommend you use a 'UV' filter or a '1A Skylight' filter. They are much less expensive than a polarizing filter and are relatively neutral in the effect they will have on the image.

You can attach a 72mm diameter filter on the end of the lens hood that comes with the camera, but this makes for a very clunky package to haul around all day. A much more elegant solution is to buy a "Yoshida Adaptor" which you can find at:

http://www3.coara.or.jp/~shingu_t/engulish/e_top.htm

This is a high quality, machined anodized aluminum ring that you can order direct from Japan, pay for it with PayPal, and it arrives in a few days. If all you want is the ability to attach a filter, you want to buy the model 1055 (add B or S, depending on the color of the camera you have). This allows you to use a 55mm diameter filter, you leave it on all the time, and the entire package is very cool.
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 8:05 PM   #3
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Although I have only used a circular it is my understanding a linear works just as well on a Fluzi. I also only find it useful in only certain situations. You may be better off with a UV filter.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 2:26 AM   #4
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Thanks for the info.

I was looking at the Raynox site and see that they make a Polarizer and lens protection kit with lens holder that doesn't need the lens hood fitted, also the polarizer is a linear type so a circular type is not necessary for the FZ-10.

I also did a bit of drooling over their 2.2x Teleconversion lens for the FZ-10, 920mm Telephoto, woohoo!, looks like thats next on the shopping list.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 3:06 AM   #5
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Hi,
I just been experimenting with a Hoya linear polarizer on my FZ2.
I got it 2nd hand for 5 EUR in Ebay.
I don't see any of the theoretical problems with metering / focusing which would justify the need for a circular polarizer.
I do see a loss of some 1. 5 F-stops, the sky colour is a little bit different and not much else to be honest.
So basically, it protects the lenses and works like a ND filter when there is too much little for your requirements...

Have fun!
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Old Apr 8, 2004, 2:21 PM   #6
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HI

What a the certain situations you find it useful on

what's th ebnefit of linear vs circular what's the cost difference

i'm about to make purchase

mostly interested in dark blue skies & white clouds

also plan to get the haze or sky light filter to leave on all the time

thanks

lou
Quote:
Originally Posted by genece
Although I have only used a circular it is my understanding a linear works just as well on a Fluzi. I also only find it useful in only certain situations. You may be better off with a UV filter.
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Old Apr 8, 2004, 2:28 PM   #7
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I thought that your need for circular versus linear had something to do with either the zoom or focus of the lens being a rotating type or linear (in and out) type. No? Maybe this is just a 35mm film camera issue.
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Old Apr 8, 2004, 2:43 PM   #8
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If the front element of your lens rotates when focusing or zooming, as is common to most SLR lenses, you need a circular polarizer. If the front element is fixed, get a linear. Keep in mind you can vary the amount of polarization of a linear filter by rotating it - polarizing filters only let light in in a certain direction.
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