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Old Jun 15, 2004, 11:18 AM   #1
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I have new FZ10 . I like it very much but I am having a problem. Whenever I take sunlight shots that contain a white object (waterfall , bird, flower), the white object detail is washed out / overexposed.I amusing it in full automatic. I have tried to spot meter but that results in an unacceptably dark image overall.

I am experienced 35MM shooter but have never seen this problem occur so consistently as I have with the new FZ10.

Does anyone have suggestions for me?



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Old Jun 15, 2004, 11:49 AM   #2
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Welcome to the world of little sensors and limited dynamic range. Most people shoot for the highlight detail and bring up the rest of the image in an image editor. Blown highlights are just gone, but you can bring up the shadows easily if they are just a little underexposed. If you really have to pull the shadows out of the weeds you often need noise reduction, but you can still get them.

Learn to shoot with the histogram. It takes a while to understand what it is telling you. You can do just about as well with the spot meter if you sort of bracket around the highlight area you want. Some people make a guess and just reduce the EV, but that is a poor approach without the histogram.

If you aren't into image editing consider a decent image editor. The digital darkroom is clean and efficient.
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Old Jun 15, 2004, 12:19 PM   #3
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35mm keeps a lot of highlight detail that digital just doesn't reach.This is something you have to get used to when using any digital camera.

Some things you can try:

1: Reduce the contrast settings of your camera. Then adjust the contrast in Photoshop, while keeping your extreme highlights and shadows.

2: Expose for highlights, and boost shadows... as has already been suggested.

3: Use graduated density filters if you want to keep detail in your skies.

4: Use a tripod, and take 2 bracketed shots. Merge them using Photoshop later.



I'm sure there are more suggestions out there, but those are the major ones.
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Old Jun 15, 2004, 1:48 PM   #4
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It may help to try changing the white balance to sunlight or manual. I carry a white card in my bag to use for manual white balance.
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Old Jun 15, 2004, 3:12 PM   #5
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Thanks for all of the good advice!

Much of my photography has to be shot quickly as I am usually with a group of hikers...my stops must be very brief. I don't have much time set up. Sounds like my best choice is spot metering the whites and correcting rest of shot when I edit. What do you think?


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Old Jun 15, 2004, 6:24 PM   #6
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pomadorojoe wrote:
Quote:
I have new FZ10 . I like it very much but I am having a problem. Whenever I take sunlight shots that contain a white object (waterfall , bird, flower), the white object detail is washed out / overexposed.I amusing it in full automatic. I have tried to spot meter but that results in an unacceptably dark image overall.

FZ-10's multisegment meter is not very effective and frequently causes over-exposure. It is not uncommon to get what you said in the full auto mode and on-spot meter. Try to decrease the exposure by 2/3 EV or even 1 EV using the exposure compensation feature. When you use spot metering at a white object, you need to increase exposure by about 2/3 EV. See the Exposure Compensation page of my Nikon Coolpix 4500 User Guide. The theory of exposure compensation is camera independent. Only the way of setting compensation depends on camera buttons and menu.



CK

http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam

Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500/5700 User Guide


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Old Jun 15, 2004, 6:49 PM   #7
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Until you get more experience with your FZ10, there are 2 approaches I would recommend:

Use the live histogram, and adjust the exposure until you don't blow out the highlights.

Or use the FZ10's exposure bracketing.



Bob
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Old Jun 15, 2004, 7:53 PM   #8
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Carrying two cameras ia a recommandation I have heard on various forums. The fz10 for macro and ultrzoom and a conpact point and shoot for those quick pictures that you don't have the time to check settings. Based on my 5 months of using the fz10 I agree and will be shopping for a small companion camera. Will not be a panasonic since their product support (firmware update) is terrible.

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