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Old Sep 1, 2004, 11:06 AM   #11
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You can take a look at some of my panoramas:
http://69.23.132.242/~tibor/Albums/S...DVacation.html
(there's also a nice one on the page 2)

All of them are done without a tripod, and I used Photoshop CS's stitching feature.

For me the tricky part is to get the correct exposure for the sky, so what I usually do is meter my first frame and then holding the shutter down "slide" and compose the second, and so on frames.
I eyeball the composition with the horizon.
Any critique would be appreciated.

(I should mention that those are all very amature-ish, and I didn't do any post-processing (except for maybe level correction). Stiching lines are rather easily spotted if you know what to look for. But for 15 minutes of work I can't complain.)

Of course, they can't be compared to paulmj's stuff, but it's a good start.

BTW, does anyone know of any good stitching software for OS X right off hand?

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Old Sep 1, 2004, 12:34 PM   #12
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Steve,
your panoramas are very beautiful and awe-inspiring, how many photos do you usually stitch together?
(I don't like to go more than 3.)

And do you prefer landscape or portrait format when shooting? (vertical vs. horizontal)

Thanks.

Tibor
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Old Sep 1, 2004, 6:48 PM   #13
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Wow! Those are really nice shots! Thanks for the info. I got a shot a few days ago in Oregon I'll try to stich together this weekend.


If i want to make a print out of it, what resolution would be good and use ofoto.com or something to print?

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Old Sep 1, 2004, 6:57 PM   #14
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From what I understand, an image needs to be in the neighborhood of 300 DPI for printing.

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Old Sep 1, 2004, 8:26 PM   #15
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Well, here's a newbie question:

What's the difference between using a "Panoramic" software and simply using an image editor (e. g., Photoshop) to carefully put all the pieces together?

I own the ArcSoft Panorama Maker which came with the FZ10, does anyone know how good is it compared to other similar programs?

Thanks.
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Old Sep 1, 2004, 11:19 PM   #16
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Two replies to the last two messages:

1) You don't need 300 dpi to get good prints. Generally, anything better than 200 dpi will do fine. I have many 12" x 18" enlargements made from 200 dpi resolution images and I get dynamite results. Realize that an image coming from just about all digital cameras is delivered at 72 dpi, all you need to see it well on a computer screen. However, if you're gonna print it, you need to increase the resolution which simultaneously reduces the image dimensions.

2) There are amany ways to stitch panoramas, assuming the component images were properly produced to begin with. It's just that stand-alone stitching software like Panorama Factory make the job much easier to do.




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Old Sep 2, 2004, 12:01 AM   #17
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Hey Tibor, "smilepak" and Jose ---

First of all, I checked out your albums, Tibor, and your panos came out pretty good! The Black Hills is a natural pano subject so you can get the proper feeling for its immensity and vastness. The longest pano I've ever done was comprised of 8 pics and it didn't really turn out because the scene was so long it was curved, and I had difficulties matching up the colors in the panels. I eventually split it up into 2 4-pic panosI printed out at 8 x 22 and they came out fine. 4 or 5 stitched pics seem to work out the best. As to whether portrait or landscape framing, I find it depends on how close I am to what I want to capture. I used portrait format for this one as to achieve the same thing with "landscape" would've pushed the picture out too far and lost the perspective of being right in front of you ---

http://trailhiker.smugmug.com/gallery/131129/2/6974205

And on this one I wanted to get as much sweep of land as possible, so landscape was best ---

http://trailhiker.smugmug.com/gallery/131129/2/7364472

So it kinda depends on what you want to emphasize. Jose, I have some friends who use the PanoramaMaker software included with the FZ10 and they get very good results. Most programs are probably good enough for putting panos on the Web but when you print and frame them like I do you want them to be perfect, and Panorama Factory lets me tweak the images until it's seamless.It's free for 30 days and if you really are into panos then it's worth getting. Here's a gallery ofphotos done with the Pano Factory software --

http://www.panoramafactory.com/gallery_1.html



It's all great fun, and it's EXTREMELY addictive...



Best Wishes,


Steve

http://trailhiker.smugmug.com
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Old Sep 2, 2004, 11:40 AM   #18
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Thank you Steve and paulmj for pointers and answers.

Since I've only done a few panoramas, I haven't experimented with 200 DPI, but I'm sure it would look fine. (I'll have to compare them side by side) (And yes, it's important to note that photos coming out of the camera are usually at 72 DPI)

One more thing about stitching in photoshop:
Photoshop CS has a photomerge function under the automate option. (Go to File/Browse, select the photos you want merged, then click on Automate/Photomerge) That is what I use to stitch and then do some minor cleanup on the sky.
(I'll have to try out some dedicated stitching apps, I'm guessing they have better algorithms.)

One thing to keep in mind when making panoramas of somewhat close subjects is the barrel distortion. Unless the distorted edges are cropped a bit prior to stitching, one can get pretty noticeable artifacts. (But this hasn't been issue for me when shooting landscapes.)

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Old Sep 2, 2004, 12:02 PM   #19
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Tibor ---



That's why panoramic software has an advantage over all-in-one image programs like PS or Paint Shop Pro. Among other things, Panorama Factory corrects for barrel distortion --- also focal range and other things that you need to correct to make the pano as seamless as possible.



Best Wishes,

Steve

http://trailhiker.smugmug.com
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Old Sep 2, 2004, 12:06 PM   #20
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Further to all this, Panorama Factory has a 30-day free evaluation program. Why not just try it and see?
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