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Old Aug 26, 2004, 4:51 PM   #1
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Any tips or info?
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Old Aug 26, 2004, 5:22 PM   #2
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Always use a tripod preferably with a panoramic head, lock focus and exposure by using manual focus and manual exposure. My favorite software is Panorama Factory, it has a profile for the FZ10 so it can correct barrel distortion etc.

For more FZ10 tips look here:

http://www.users.bigpond.com/vkelim/DMCFZ10/index.html

Klaas Bloem
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 9:37 PM   #3
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I never use a tripod, all hand-held and manual eyeballing for the overlapas well asthe horizon, often from a moving platform like a ship, often with people moving around. Just wait for the right moment, shoot quickly, and use a high-speed storage card. I've done it this way for years with good results.

Not perfect, but not bad either.

I also use Panorama Factory.

I've posted up some pictures taken with the DMC-FZ10 from a recent Alaska cruise:

http://www.pbase.com/paulmj/serenade_alaska

Also, some I took on a pre-cruise holiday in the Banff - Lake Louise area:

http://www.pbase.com/paulmj/canadian_rockies

Most, but not all of these pictures were taken with the Panasonic. A few were taken with a Pentax Optio 555. It doesn't really matter what kind of camera you use, the technique is the same, the results are similar.


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Old Aug 27, 2004, 10:05 PM   #4
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paulmj wrote:
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I never use a tripod, all hand-held and manual eyeballing for the overlapas well asthe horizon, often from a moving platform like a ship, often with people moving around. Just wait for the right moment, shoot quickly, and use a high-speed storage card. I've done it this way for years with good results.

Not perfect, but not bad either.

Yes, they can be shot hand-held but if there is some objectin the close foreground you quickly run into trouble that way. I had seen your pano's before and like them very much!
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 10:15 PM   #5
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Just about everything I do is scenic, so I rarely have to cope with something in the foregound. I'm glad you like my work.
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 11:12 PM   #6
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I too have the FZ10 and regularly do landscape panoramas. I've been using the Panorama Factory software for about 3 years now and find it easy to use and versatile in terms of tweaking the image for maximum quality --- perhaps not as important if you're posting on the Web, but I also print and frame panos so the stitching has to be as spot-on as possible. I also line the images up manually and find the "recording guide line" grid in the viewscreen sometimes useful to make sure they're not too far off. As long as the images are overlapped by at least 20% Panorama Factory pretty much makes the pano for you. I really haven't had any problems lining up foreground images, either; if interested, you can check out some panos I've done with the FZ10 ---

http://trailhiker.smugmug.com/gallery/131129

Panos are fun with the FZ10 and can really give you the perspective of "being there".



Best Wishes,

Steve

http://trailhiker.smugmug.com/
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Old Aug 28, 2004, 1:11 AM   #7
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Steve, I like your stuff. You do good work.

As a happy owner of an FZ10, wouldn't you agree that you could do any of these panoramics with just about any digital camera being sold today as long as you know what you're doing?

I mean, I like the FZ10 for long-lens stuff shot at 12X such as:

http://www.pbase.com/image/32636029

and:

http://www.pbase.com/image/32636017

The FZ10 isa nice package, but not the be-all and end-all in my opinion.

On our recentcruise to Alaska, we had the FZ10 and most of the stuff I took was with this camera when it was convenient to carry it along. However, on a flightseeing trip out of Ketchikan, I used a Pentax Optio 555 (5 MP, 5X optical) because it was much smaller and thereby much less cumbersome to handle while hanging out the window in a small aircraftvs. the FZ10.

http://www.pbase.com/image/32636013

I also had a Pentax Optio S4i, a very tiny little thing (4MP, 3X optical). On formal night when we went to dinner on the ship, I pocketed the S4i to take some impromptu pictures of our table guests.

Of course, not everyone can afford three cameras! However, speaking for myself, I would rather spend the money on the three different cameras for different purposes than, say, a D70 which may surely be good at what it does but certainlywitha size penalty.

Back on panoramics again, bottom line to me is that it doesn't matter what the camera is.

By the way, I like your shots of the LA basin. Here's one I took on "one of those rare days":

http://www.pbase.com/image/31891007







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Old Aug 28, 2004, 10:49 AM   #8
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Hi Paul,

You're right about pretty much any camera being able to do panoramas. Prior to the FZ10 I had the Olympus D490Z and I was happy with the results at the time, but of course there's a difference in resolution between a 2.1 and 4Mp camera, and I can see itin side-by-side comparisons. It's especially noticable in an 8 x 22 print.But heck, I even scanned photos from my "old" Pentax film camera and turned it into a frame-able pano. The FZ10 merely adds more flexibility to the panorama "arsenal" at one's disposal, but it's basically the Panorama Factory program that does all the gruntwork, and I've used it exclusively with all my images for the past 3 years.As far as the FZ10 is concerned, since I backpack and dayhike I appreciatethe camera's IS, 12x zoom, f2.8 brightness throughout its range --- and its relative portability, especially compared to the DSLRs. Yes, it does have its limitations in certain situations --- I'd certainlythink twice about taking a picwhile hanging out a plane like you were, and I've had mixed resultsat indoor partiesusing the onboard flash, making me consider getting a smaller camera for those "on-the-fly, point-and-shoot" times when I don't have time to futz around with the settings--- but I'm having too much darned fun with the Fluzi otherwise, and I'm getting wildlife shotscomparable to what only could've been done with a heavy DSLR and pounds of equipment. BTW, the San Gabriel pano is great! Fantastic birds-eye view of the valley and snow-capped San Gabriels. And your Alaskan photos....panos are the only way toeven hint at the jaw-dropping perspective of the Alaskan landscape. I went on a small-boat Inside Passage cruise a few years back but clouds consistently obscured the immense vistas. Do you print out any of your panos? I use the Canon s9000 wide-carriage printer and get eye-popping results. Thanks for sharing, and keep up the great panoramic work!

Steve

http://trailhiker.smugmug.com/
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Old Aug 28, 2004, 11:47 AM   #9
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I often make enlargements of some of the better stuff I've done. I find I can get quality 12" x 18' prints for $3 at Costco, with overnight service.

One thing I do is to change the 72 DPI resolution as it comes from the camera to 250+ DPI using Photoshop. I also do some contrast and coloration adjustments.

The difference in an enlargement done this way as opposed to something that comes right out of the camera is very apparent.

By the way, what is "Fluzi"?
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Old Aug 28, 2004, 12:13 PM   #10
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In the past I used to change from 72dpi to 300dpi in my Paint Shop Pro 8.1 for printing out pics from 4 x 6 to 13 x 19 and beyond, but now I let the Qimage program re-interpolate for me and the difference is striking. I'mabout to head off to Aaron Bros to use a 25% off certificate and get this pano framed, the printed image is 7" x 21 & 3/4" ---

http://trailhiker.smugmug.com/galler.../6504949/Large

"Fluzi"? It's a nickname for the FZ line of Panasonic cameras. The folks over at the DPreview Panasonic forum have discussed its origins ---

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...essage=9886037

Best Wishes,

Steve


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