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Old Oct 10, 2004, 8:31 PM   #1
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I am a newbie at this digital camera lark and I have just gone out and brought myself a fz-20! all i can say is WOW!

I do need help though, as i have only had it for a few days, not quite sure what i amdoing wrong! When trying to take photosof a moving subject they blur quite easily on the scene 1 sports mode, i then change to 'S' shutter speed andhave triedmanydifferent variations! but when i increase the shutter speed the picture comes out black! I increase the exposure and still nothing really happens!I don't know why this is and how i can overcome this? Ihope somebody can shed some light(excuse the pun) on my problem!

Alice
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Old Oct 11, 2004, 4:35 PM   #2
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Alice:

This is one of the most common problems a new user has with a camera (blurred photos of moving subjects). It's caused by shutter speeds being too slow.

Here is another post I answered today on the same topic (for a new Nikon Coolpix 5200 user):

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=21

What is bright to the human eye is not to a camera's lens.

The shutter speed a camera can use depends on the amount of light available (which is very low in typical indoor incandescent lighting), the aperture of the lens, and the ISO speed. If you try to use faster shutter speeds when the camera is already using the largest aperture available (which your camera will in lower light), then the photo will be underexposed (as you found out).

Indoors with most models, you'll need to use a flash or a tripod (if shooting a stationary subject). Otherwise, the shutter speeds will be too slow to prevent motion blur from camera shake and/or subject movement.

Shutter speed with a flash in low light is not as critical. This is because the flash burst is very short. Since the subject is not exposed well enough for proper exposure exceptfor the very short flash duration, the flash itself has the impact of freezing the action in lower light. Of course, you'll need to make sure that the subject is within the flash range.

For outdoor use, shutter speeds are usually much faster. But, the shutter speed a camera needs for proper exposure is still dependent on the available light, aperture of the lens (with smaller f/stop numbers indicating larger available apertures), and the ISO speed (which controls the sensitivity of the sensor to light).

Each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast. However, this will have a penalty. Higher ISO speeds cause higher noise levels (similar to film grain).

A model's sports mode is usually just selecting the largest available aperture(f/2.8 with your Panasonic), so that the camera's autoexposure algorithms can use the fastest shutter speeds. In low light (as with typical indoor lighting), most models will already be selecting the largest available aperture anyway, so sports mode won't help anything. But, in good light, sports mode can help to get faster shutter speeds than normal, because the camera may be selecting a smaller aperture instead without using this mode.

If using flash or a tripod is is simply not desired (and/or you have a moving subject that you need faster shutter speeds for), you canincrease the ISO speed to get faster shutter speeds. However, this will give youhigher noise levels (similar to film grain). A free tool to help reduce the appearance of noise is Noiseware. You can download it from http://www.imagenomic.com

There are also a couple of good commercial products available when shooting at higher ISO speeds is needed:

http://www.neatimage.com

http://www.picturecode.com


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Old Oct 12, 2004, 6:01 AM   #3
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Thanks m8, that has really helped! a bit more practice and I will get there!

Thanks again
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Old Oct 12, 2004, 6:39 AM   #4
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That was a very informative answer to the question.

If I may, I'd like to offer a shorter answer of my own: you need to shoot with a lot more light. Turn on every available light indoors... or better yet, if possible, move your subject outdoors.
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Old Oct 12, 2004, 8:56 AM   #5
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Quote:
Shutter speed with a flash in low light is not as critical. This is because the flash burst is very short. Since the subject is not exposed well enough for proper exposure exceptfor the very short flash duration, the flash itself has the impact of freezing the action in lower light. Of course, you'll need to make sure that the subject is within the flash range.
This is the process I use (shutter priority withflash) to addressmy motion blurr problem. It takes a little getting use to since the EVF "blacks out" the screen (pre-image display feature) while composing the shot. I showed the wife this techniqueand she loves it. She hastaken some great pics of our son doing his normal thing indoors and most of the pics turns out really well. As mentioned before it takes a little getting use to. I wish there was a way to over-ride that annoying pre-image display when the shutter button is pressed 1/2 way.

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