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Old Oct 11, 2004, 11:50 PM   #1
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I am trying to figure out when to balance Aperture and Shutter speed. If I set aperture to 2.8 and shutter speed to 1/100, and I am shooting an object that has a bright area against a dark background, the edge of the bright area on the object has a reddish edge against the dark background.

I can set the Aperture low and the shutter speed high, or the aperture high and the shutter speed low, and get the exposure scale correct either way.

How do I balance this out to get the best picture?

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Old Oct 12, 2004, 9:24 AM   #2
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What IS mode do you use? Maybe IS Mode1 is the problem....
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Old Oct 12, 2004, 10:04 AM   #3
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I played around with this (aperture vs shutter speed and vise versa) a bit yesterday. I used the histogram which give a niceperspective of the picture result. I found low aperture with proper shutter setting provide the better results. Doing it the other way, high aperture and low shutter setting, produce a slightly over exposed image. I was doing this outside on a bright day, but I think the result will be different if done inside.

BTW, this is a good exerciseto understand the histogram feature. Being able to experiment is oneGREAT thing about digital photography, you have the ability to see the results right away to determine for yourself...no guessing game as in the old days.
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Old Oct 12, 2004, 10:49 AM   #4
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I also want to know this... I wonder if Panasonic Bob can tell us what aperture setting gives the sharpest results?
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Old Oct 12, 2004, 12:09 PM   #5
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I am thinking (and this is just a theory) that in a composition that has bright contrasts that you would want to use a higher aperture setting as to not overexpose the bright areas (even though your overall exposure may be ok), and in low light composures you would want to use a lower aperture setting. In both conditions you would want to then adjust your shutter speed to get the exposure you want.

I am just guessing at this, and if someone knows different, please point me in the right direction.

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Old Oct 12, 2004, 12:46 PM   #6
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I'm not aware of the aperture setting having any relation to contrast captured.

If the exposure is done right, the aperture setting will not give you any difference in the exposure of the shot. However, you need to be careful when balancing aperture and shutter that you don't try and force the shutter to a speed higher than it can handle, or go to one that is too long without a tripod.

If you look at reviews of lenses that fit SLRs, you find that they are a little soft at both ends of the aperture... there is usually a sweet spot around 2 or 3 stops away from the extreme. What I would like to know (preferably from Pana Bob) is where that sweet spot is on the FZ10/FZ20? Does this sweet spot work in the same way that it does on normal lenses?

Cheers,

Bob
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Old Oct 13, 2004, 4:14 PM   #7
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Aperture setting determine how large the hole is open for light to go in. It is the main factor of depth of field.

Shuttler setting determine how fast the shuttle open and close. It is the main factor of motion

In theory, the picture "light" amount is exactly the same if you set the aperture and shuttler.

What to use as priority depends on what you are planning to take picture of.

For Example:

1) If your priority is to capture still pictures and not create motion, then your shuttler speed is the priority. Then you would need a faster shuttler speed

2) If your priority is to capture depth of field, meaning your object focus point and still trying to maintain background and foreground focal point, then apeture setting is your priority. You would need a smaller setting, for example F22, F18 (smaller as is smaller opening).


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Old Oct 13, 2004, 4:29 PM   #8
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I thought what's what I said in my previous post... do you actually know the aperture that gives the sharpest results though?
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Old Oct 13, 2004, 4:59 PM   #9
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if I read it right the best aperture for sharpness is F 8.0 for the FZ20, F 22 is only something for DSLR.F 8.0 isthe max. Am I right?
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Old Oct 13, 2004, 5:45 PM   #10
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I can't recall, but I think you are right. The panasonic camera only goes up to F8, didn't realize that. Hmm

This whole time I haven't had the need to use it, been sticking with 2.8.


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