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Old Nov 12, 2004, 6:05 PM   #21
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Thanks to everyone for sharing your knowledge -- it's extremely helpful! I'm new at this and am looking for "one stop shopping" photo-editing software for less than about $150.

From these posts and looking at product descriptions, Paintshop and Photoshop Elements seem liketwo of the best choices.

Is it accurate to say that Paintshop is both easier to learn and ultimately more powerful than PS Elements? Eventually I hope to use theadvanced features.

I gather that Paintshop has simple, built-in fixes for lens distortion (barrel etc) as well as noise reduction. Do these features work as well as other, single purpose software (eg, noise reduction in NeatImage)? With PS Elements, it sounds like these features are external add-ons -- is this correct?

Thanks!

Stuart
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Old Nov 12, 2004, 6:34 PM   #22
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Yes - Neat Image is a plug-in made by a 3rd party that is not included. Plug-ins are a blessing and a curse in that regard. There's lots of great ones out there (PS plug-ins), plus "actions" which are like macros some people sell (many are free...) Paintshop Pro, however, is establishing a great reputation, especially its most recent release. Photoshop is still the gold standard, but uggh those infernal palettes.
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Old Nov 13, 2004, 11:03 AM   #23
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I agree with Nick that photoshop is the Gold Standard. Yesterday I took a picture of the US flag with a logo flag under it. It was a good shot but I noticed later that the person who put up the logo flag hung it upside down....OOPS!

Hey, who was the guy that hung the flags!

I thought my project was going to have to be redesigned at first. But, I was able to find a matching logo on a website. I copied and pasted it into photoshop. I rotated it to the proper angle and then cut, trimmed, and distorted it into position. I took the old logo and separated the shadows and wrinkles out and placed it over the new logo. This all took about 30 minutes max.

Project saved, everybody happy and I love what Photoshop can do.
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Old Nov 13, 2004, 4:25 PM   #24
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Nick, Rookie - thanks.

Yeah, I always prefer a "standard" when it works really well. It sounds like there's an in-depth knowledge base with photoshop that is way ahead of the others.

Rookie - did you use the full-blown Photoshop or Elements for the flag work? Could this have been done with Elements? How about Paintshop? At this point full-blown Photoshop way more than I want to spend.

Stuart
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Old Nov 13, 2004, 5:48 PM   #25
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stuartw wrote:
Quote:
Nick, Rookie - thanks.

Yeah, I always prefer a "standard" when it works really well. It sounds like there's an in-depth knowledge base with photoshop that is way ahead of the others.

Rookie - did you use the full-blown Photoshop or Elements for the flag work? Could this have been done with Elements? How about Paintshop? At this point full-blown Photoshop way more than I want to spend.

Stuart
I have the full blown version 7 of Photo Shop, and someday maybe I'll make it a hobbie to learn more in depth. But I got The new version of Paint Shop Pro. It gives great results and is much easier to learn.

Once I get better at photography, I may dig into Photo Shop for high endspecial effects stuff.

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Old Nov 13, 2004, 6:59 PM   #26
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Know what? Get yourself whatever Adobe program - full-blown PS or Elements. Then, set yourself down: you, your PC, the program, and PS or PS Elements "for Dummies" (or some such). Give yourself about a week or two, get some flight-time under your belt, and you'll be an intermediate-level user before you know it. You will be able to do the basics - open a file, make a print, in couple hours or less if you're semi computer literate.

Photoshop is like "Excel" or "Word" from the standpoint that most users only use 15% of their capabilities but - in the case of Excel as an example, you can graduate to pivot tables and VBA routines if the need arises, or you simply want to learn. It's there if you need it or want to take it on simply to expand your knowledge base. Photoshop is the professional standard - as far as the eye can see.

I have Photoshop 7 and (had) Elements. I was impressed with how much of Photoshop Elements gives you at its price point. Photoshop is an expensive license. You might consider starting with Elements, then making a decision down the road to graduate to PS. Elements' interface is similar to PS, your time spent learning Elements will not have been wasted. One of the good things about Elements is that it runs 3rd party Photoshop plug-ins. I use these plug-ins all the time, and many tools like Genuine Fractals, exist only as plug-ins. They're not stand alone programs.

That said, PC-printng-digital image manipulation has been around a while. It's a stable, mature technology from a software standpoint, and you really can't go wrong with any of them - even the free ones, to do the basics.

That also said, I can understand people recommending Jasc. I always liked Ulead Media Studio Pro for video editing over Adobe's Premier, as an example. Does the same thing, less expensive, shorter learning curve though it's not the "professional standard".
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Old Nov 14, 2004, 9:46 PM   #27
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thanks for the posts. i guessi will be getting educated on photoshop since that isa programwe use already.

my dad is loving his z1 for his basic point and shoot shots. he has a tendency to take about 300 pics a week and will choose a few to be printed.


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Old Nov 14, 2004, 11:00 PM   #28
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I use Photoshop 7.0 together with the book entitled " The Photoshop book for digital photographers" by Scott Kelby, an excellent combination.
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Old Nov 15, 2004, 12:45 AM   #29
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Thanks for the feedback!

Stuart
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Old Nov 15, 2004, 12:46 PM   #30
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stuartw,

I use the full blown version of Photoshop. I have version 7 right now. Everything I read in my trade magazines said Photoshop CS (like a version8.0) was not worth upgrading to. I do not know if this is still the case, but I am hoping to allocate some funds for the new version.

I understand that Photoshop Elements is pretty sweet for the price. If you ever decide to upgrade to Photoshop, the techniques will be the same. The are 2 websites that can help you get started with the Photoshop concepts. They are http://www.lonestardigital.comand http://www.megapixel.net . They have somebasic tutorials to get you started. Also, a search ongoogleforAdobe Photoshop Techniqueswill result inmore than a month's reading.

WithPhotoshop there are always multiple ways to approachphoto correction. I particularly like adjustment layers. The original photo stays intact (so I can always start over) andI place layers over the top of the image that make the correction.I can then mix and match, and turn on and off the different layersto get different results.

Nicktrop or azmat,

Do you have a technique for noise correction inPhotoshop? I have been using a combination of Noise>Despeckle or >Median followed with the Unsharp Mask and a little Gaussian Blur. It works O.K. most times. I don't have a whole lot of problems with noise. Most photos I work with come from high end pro photographers. I let them do all the work. The FZ10 is what Ihave for my own personal use.
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