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Old Dec 15, 2004, 11:50 AM   #11
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Replies from Canon and Fuji are in, nothing from Nikon yet.

I also sent a similar query to PhotoLife a Canadian photo magazine and to
George Lepp's Outdoor Photographer column

I'd suggest that everyone check their manuals and send a query to the manufacturer about their cameras cold weather use, when the manual's states 0c-40c operating range. To me this means they are selling a product not intended for use during half the year in a lot of the countries the cameras are being sold in.

I just think all the manufacturers were called on this point. :twisted:

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Old Dec 15, 2004, 6:03 PM   #12
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Just a rule of thumb...

If it is so cold that you have to jump start the whiskey jacks with ground squirrels then it may not be a good time to take your dig cam.

:-):-)
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Old Dec 15, 2004, 7:53 PM   #13
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All things equal, IC chips in a consumer electronic device will work better in the cold than in the heat. Of course extremes in either direction will shut stuff down. Other parts of the camera are more sensitive to the cold.

Since I have the good fortune to live and backpack in the Northern Rockies I can testify that the FZ10 is not hurt by near freezing temps. In fact, all my nights but one this 'summer' went below 32F and the camera did just fine.

john


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Old Dec 16, 2004, 12:43 AM   #14
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I agree, I have been using my digitals in the cold for years without incident. I'm just bugged by every manufacturer putting that operating temp range that dosen't match the countries they are selling in, in their manuals.

Still no response from good old Nikon :G, I have a response from everyone else I sent the query in to.
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Old Dec 16, 2004, 9:03 AM   #15
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PeterP: I look forward to seeing your post of the mfr replies.

I noticed my Kodak DC4800 (my current annoying digicam, haven't got the fz20 yet) also specs 0-40.

My (uneducated) guess is that the 0 C cold end is driven by the condensation issue with water freezing & causing damage. I searched around and read the earlier post from last year ( http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...74&forum_id=23 ) and one thing you do have to realize about product manufacturers (our company does medical instrument design) who take testing seriously is that when they have a specification for anything (including temperature) they have to test for it. Anything outside the spec is difficult/impossible to comment on officially because of legal/warranty concerns. They're only going to warrant their product down to the temperature they test it at. Any attempts to get them to say that it's really OK to operate the product outside the spec, are futile. It's not being mean or evasive or anything, that's just the way it works. That's what a warranty means; if they're going to warranty it at all, they have to tell you the bounds under which they'll do it, and in this case it's 0 C - 40 C.
It's a shame that the post last year degraded into an argument... It's probably OK for a manufacturer to tell you what kind of things might fail if you did operate outside the spec, and what kind of steps you might take to minimize those failures -- but it's outside the spec and you're on your own at that point.
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Old Dec 22, 2004, 2:21 PM   #16
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Well the final responses came in and here they are, pretty much what I expected though from the Manfacturers.
A bit of interesting info from G. Lepp and Associates though.

Enjoy and hopeing for an early thaw. Peter of the North........

Chilly me to Nikon wrote:
Quote:
Reading through the Coolpix 5400 manual on page 157 it says the operating temperature range is 0c-40c/32f-104f.
Does this mean the camera should not be used outdoors when the temperature drops into the Canadian winter zone?
0c is a warm spring day here in Canada and I have used my other film based cameras here with no problems at -30c.

Nikon wrote:
Quote:
Queation cannot be answered on-line please call Customer Support
Pete's call to Nikon Customer Support wrote:
Quote:
Camera will slow down and may stop working in the cold.
Chilly me to Canon wrote:
Quote:
Reading through the EOS 20D manual on page 163 it says the operating temperature range is 0c-40c/32f-104f.
Does this mean the camera should not be used outdoors when the temperature drops into the Canadian winter zone?
0c is a warm spring day here in Canada and I have used my other film based EOS cameras here with no problems at -30c.

On the same note is there and external power source that can supply power to the camera while the batteries are kept warm inside a coat?

Thanks Peter.

Canon wrote:
Quote:
Thank you for your e-mail inquiry regarding the EOS 20D. You are correct, the operating temperature range for the EOS 20D is 0 to 40 degrees Celsius. Operating the camera outside this temperature range may result in malfunction. As this is the case, measures should be taken to keep the camera warm (above 0 degrees Celsius) if operating the camera in cold environments.

Unfortunately Canon Inc. does not manufacture an external power source for use with the EOS 20D.
However, you may use the ACK-E2 AC adapter kit to operate the camera from an AC outlet.
In addition, you may consider using the BG-E2 battery grip for greater battery performance.


Chilly me to Fuji wrote:
Quote:
Reading through the A201 manual on page 79 it says the operating temperature range is 0c-40c/32f-104f. Does this mean the camera should not be used outdoors when the temperature drops into the Canadian winter zone?
0c is a warm spring day here in Canada and I have used my other film based cameras here with no problems at -30c.

Thanks Peter.

Fuji wrote:
Quote:
Yes, what you are saying is correct. We cannot guarantee the camera will operate normally outside of the specified temperature range.
Chilly me to Lepp and Associates wrote:
Quote:
I now own several different brands of digital Point&Shoot and DSLR cameras and all of them state in their manuals their
operating temperature range is 0c-40c/32f-104f. Does this mean the digital cameras should not be used outdoors when the temperature drops
into the Canadian winter zone? 0c is a warm spring day here in Canada and I have used my other film based cameras here with no problems at -30c.
If this is the case, as an outdoor enthusiast who spends a great deal of time outdoors snow-shoeing, hiking, and cross-country skiing,
I will be making the switch back to film in a hurry.

I tried querying the manufacturers but all I got back was a reiteration of the manuals.

Lepp and Assocaites wrote:
Quote:
George does a lot of photography in sub freezing weather (in Canada, Alaska and the Eastern Sierras).
He has been using all digital cameras for almost 3 years now.
My understanding is that the main problem with the digital SLR being used in sub-freezing temps is the possibility of the LCD screen freezing.
So, it is important to keep the camera in a warm place whenever possible, particularly the LCD screen, and don't use it for too long in the
cold before warming it up.
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