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Old Feb 12, 2005, 10:47 AM   #21
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7. for horizon / landscape photography

Interesting sky ?65% sky35% land.
Interesting landscape ? 35 % sky 65 % land.

This always works Offcourse there are dozens of exceptions... but I hold these for standard compositions.


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8. Indoorphotography with flash ->

Use the Manual settings. Flash power below middle. And use 1/15 1/20 shutterspeed at iso 100/200. This way the flash gets the subject real sharp, and the low shutterspeed gets the colors and the background right.

Everyone should try this :GIt really makes a difference 1/60 or 1/15.



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Old Feb 12, 2005, 1:06 PM   #22
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A fat woman telling a fat man- " Thanks for the tip":blah:
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 3:25 PM   #23
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Thanks for the bump as I had not read this post. In another post, that I now can't find, someone recommended a book on photography saying "it will be the best $20.00 you have spent". Can anyone direct me to that post or recommend a good book for beginners? Thanks
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 3:38 PM   #24
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I think you can learn even more from a forum or internet information / tutorials.. than from a book. I know there are some books that are good by national geographic (heard from...)
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 3:41 PM   #25
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I am hardly an expert but here goes
1. Burst mode, burst mode, burst mode. If you are shooting at a low shutter speed or anything that is moving/changing then use burst. I have gotten decently good shots at 1/4 of at full zoom using burst.

2. 2 second time is very useful for those slow shutter speeds (so you don't nudge the camera when you press the shutter button down all the way)

3. Try to keep the ISO at or below 100 unless having a too slow shutter speed will ruin your picture. Remember, noise is easy enough to remove, blur is near impossible.

4. Don't take pictures at full wide angle if there is anything noticablly straight in your picture (like a building) as you will notice barrel distortion. Zoom in just a tad and it is reduced a lot. For most other situations, barrel distortion isn't too noticable.

5. Take lots and lots and lots of pictures. And don't be overly critical when you look at them on the LCD, wait until you see them on the computer before you get rid of ones that you think might be decent.

6. Don't be afraid of trying out lots of settings for pictures (sharpness, contrast, aperture vs. shutter, etc).

7. Take a picture of the same thing from mulitple angles, it can really make a difference in a lot of shots.

8. Use the histogram as sometimes things look brighter than they really are on the LCD

9. Invest in a high speed SD card, it helps for shot-to-shot time, and it makes a big difference in burst shot refresh time.

10. Stop reading these comments and start shooting

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Old Feb 12, 2005, 6:15 PM   #26
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Just my two cents, i've found it's useful to carry a spotlight type flashlight with you when you're shooting in the dark. Painting that light on your subject will give your camera something to focus on instead of trying to hazard a guess on focus on a black screen. I'd imagine a flashlight you could wear on your head would help, but mine isn't nearly as bright as the cheap three dollar camp spotlight I bought at Wal-Mart for my night trips. I hear a laser pointer with shape adapters also works for this, particularly ones that put out horizontal lines.

Another thing I try to keep in mind is to try and avoid looking at my subjects from a literal angle. That is, don't walk up and take a snapshot, but try and look at angles of the scenery around your subject as well. When I think of it as a 'Composition' rather then a 'Picture', I get much better results.
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 6:20 PM   #27
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Requiem wrote:
Quote:
I'd imagine a flashlight you could wear on your head would help,
Wooohooo - After seeing merooting in the bushes taking macro caterpillar pictures, the neighbors think I'm either crazy or a security risk of some type. Wearing a miner's hardhat or a flashlight attached to my head won't help my cause much on this front. . . :blah:

I do like the idea of a pocket flashlight though and can manage that one whilst still maintaining some dignity! Thanks for a good tip!




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Old Feb 12, 2005, 7:16 PM   #28
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TimvdVelde wrote:
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I think you can learn even more from a forum or internet information / tutorials.. than from a book.
I have to disagree with you there Tim, the internet and forums like this will teach you things when you know what to look for. It will also have a lot to do with the sort of learner you are as well. I have learnt far more about photography from a few hours reading a good photography book than I have in this forum. On the other hand I have learnt a lot more about the Panasonic FZ10 than what I could have learnt in a book.

In terms of a good book, go to your local book store and grab a couple and just start reading and see if it seems good to you. You can also read peoples reviews on places like Amazon.com which can be useful.

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Old Feb 12, 2005, 8:15 PM   #29
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1. Get to know your camera(s) well...., read the manual many times, become at one with your camera it needs to be an extension of you, you will need to take many pictures to become adept with the camera, read FAQ's eg for the FZ1 here.

2. You need to grasp.... ISO speed, aperture size, shutter speed, Depth of field, backlighting, avoiding highlight
blowout, Hyperfocal distance. learn how to and use EV + or - compensation and use bracketing + or - ... for this read books on the theory of above.
Ansell Adams books a good start. Study galleries on the web much great work out there, and not all pro stuff.
Post processing needs to be mastered to optimize image out of the box.

3. Composition...., avoid symmetry when applicable, leave space for the subject to look into in the picture ie a person, bird or an animal, keep it simple avoid extraneous objects, keep horizon at 1/3 down or 2/3 down not 1/2 way, use lines to lead the eye into the picture, try when applicable to use the rule of thirds.

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Old Feb 12, 2005, 9:05 PM   #30
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Thanks TimV and Treemonkey, I will stay with the forums. I find the feedback (suggestions for exposure, composition,etc.) to be very helpful and informative. I know a book can not replace the knowledge we novices gain by posting a picture on the forum for comments. However, I feel I need to do a little more reading than what is contained in the manual for me to better understand and use the suggestions given. Although, as many have said, in the end it is practice, practice, practice. So please be patient with us newbies while we practice, practice, practice. Again Thanks!
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