Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 7, 2005, 4:58 PM   #21
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 24
Default

atkins:

Were you using the built-in flash the whole time?
vitiris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 7, 2005, 7:30 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Nancy Gabby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 662
Default

in manual mode the picture might be dark b/c it simulates the light coming thru the iris/aperture. So you want to make sure you open up to f2.8 and if you are indoors your shutter should be at 1/15th or 1/8th. You can get a higher shutter speed if you set your ISO to 400. The camera simulates the dof preview on a 35mm camera. On those cameras you would hit a button and it would manually close the aperture (which you can see if you look in the front of the lens) which usually makes the image in the viewfinder very dark so that you could get an idea of the depth of field (DOF). This is useful when you are trying to keep everything in focus. On the FZ20 it worked well for me b/c when I did some moon photos I just kept playing with the the settings until the image on my LCD was in the right exposure, and when you take the picture it pretty much looks exactly the same as the LCD. The problem is, it is very hard to use the manual mode with a flash, b/c when the flash fires you have to have stopped down and usually the shutter is set at 1/60th of a second, so the LCD will look black unless you open up your aperture and make your shutter speed slower. I think this is a fault in the camera, they should have it exactly like 35mm cameras where you could preview it by hitting a button, or choosing it on a menu. But to have it on all of the time is pretty dumb.
Nancy Gabby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 11, 2005, 2:01 PM   #23
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 24
Default

Thanks to everyone for the replies. The external sunpak 383 helped tremendously with this camera. I definitely would recommend an external flash (as I'm sure everyone does) once you find the right camera. However, this camera produced way too much noise for my liking - even at ISO80. I returned it (at 15% restocking fee) and purchased the Nikon 8800. Yes, more money, and supposedly more megapixels=more noise. BUT: The 8800 camera has ISO50. The only downsides that I remember looking at is:

1. I have to buy other memory (compactflash)

2. The maximum aperture value at full zoom is 5.2 or 5.8 (not f8, like the FZ20 can handle).

3. Still noise at ISO100 (most cameras have noise; finding one that reduces it byp usingbetter algorithms is the hard part)

4. The zoom: 10x vs 12x - not really a downside. The difference isn't that much when you see the pictures. Plus, with 8MP vs 5MP, you can crop/zoom to get the extra 2x (even though it's digital at that point) and you won't notice a drop in quality.

The Nikon 8800 has more features (including user memory to store settings, D-Lighting to fix pictures on the fly, BSS to take some of guesswork out of Exposure). Of course, I haven't tried this camera, so I may not like it. However, It was $200.00 more than the FZ20, so I figured it was worth the try. I'm not ragging on the FZ20, so please don't take it that way - it took very nice outdoor pictures. I was waiting for the FZ20 to come out - mainly for the Image Stabilization, so that's why I stuck with that camera - I had my heart set on it. I've learned alot in a short amount of time and I'm sure the standard 4x6 pictures would have printed fine (no noise noticable). However, forsome of my pictures, I'd like to create larger prints.

You guys (Y'all) have helped me quite a bit. I now know more about aperture, shutter speed, etc. and how they work together. I still have tons to learn, but I feel much better and less intimidated working in Priority modes (manual mode still has me baffled sometimes). I've read many things on the internet about exposures/aperture, etc. so hopefully I will retain that and remember what to look for when I'm shooting.

Once again, thanks to all who replied with the wonderful tips.

PS:has anybody used the Cheat Sheets from http://www.photocheatsheets.com I'd like to know how helpful they were/are.
I can't really find any reviews on them - except from their website (which of course they're not going to put negative stuff on there)
vitiris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 11, 2005, 2:16 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 130
Default

vitiris,

I'm sorry you had problems with the camera, and I hope you have better luck with your new one - you're getting a very good camera. I wish I had read this post earlier, though.

I bought my FZ10 in June. It was not only my first digital camera, but my first camera, period. My wife had an SLR, but I was never interested. However, we were taking a vacation in June, and I wanted a digital camera.

Since then, I've become consumed and fascinated by photography and this camera, and I've taken over 3000 photos. I'm "the" photographer at my sons' Scouts meetings and campouts now.

The thing is, when I first got my camera, my shots were unsatisfactory, and I showed them to a friend who owns the Nikon 5700 (a great camera, and the price has come down a ton), and said I thought I'd return my FZ10. He said, "Uh, the problem isn't the camera, it's you. You need practice."

I discovered he was right, in my case. I tended to move the camera ever so slightly when pressing the shutter button, so I've practiced using breathing to help - AND using the 2-second timer, and leaning against something, or kneeling, or using a tripod.

I love the shots I get now, and I'd compare them to any other camera. It may be simpler to get some of the shots with some other cameras, I don't know, but I think a lot of it is technique. I've been reading photography books (and blogs), and it's helped immensely.

I say all that for two reasons - one, to help you if you still get unsatisfactory photos with your new camera; and two, to help anyone who's experiencing the same thing. To them, I'd say, don't give up yet - practice, study, learn, and have fun.

I wish you sincere good luck. I love the Nikon 5700, too, so I hope the 8800 is great for you. Just remember - the camera is justa tool, and you have to learn to use it to its potential.

The Sunpak 383 made a huge difference for me, and for Christmas I added the Lumiquest system, which is awesome. If you keep your Sunpak, look into the Lumiquest system (includes the 80-20 and inserts) for making the light source bigger.

Have fun!
cageyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 11, 2005, 2:28 PM   #25
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 24
Default

cageyman wrote:
Quote:
Just remember - the camera is justa tool, and you have to learn to use it to its potential.
Thanks! That makes me feel tons better about the experience (no sarcasm in that sentence - even though it may seem that way). I know with all the great photos I've seen from all types of cameras, that the potential is there. I just have to do a better job myself.
vitiris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 11, 2005, 3:28 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
nooner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,452
Default

Good attitude. Keep trying and you'll find your stride:arrow::arrow::arrow::arrow::arrow::arrow::a rrow:
nooner is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:52 PM.