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Old Jan 15, 2005, 2:33 PM   #1
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Hi, I just got a Panasonic FZ20 and I LOVE IT. I am a little confused on which format to shoot pictures in though. When I shoot in tiff it also creates a high quality jpeg. My question is: is this jpeg the same as the high quality jpeg setting that is a step below the tiff setting? The manual and website do not make clear if the jpeg it creates when it creates the tiff is of a higher quality than the jpeg setting (if that makes sense). I don't have a tripod so comparing the quality of the two is nearly impossible. I couldn't find anything in my searching so any help is appreciated.
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 3:01 PM   #2
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The TIFF is uncompressed. JPG files loose resolution with each open and resave (gets recompressed each time). So if you plan on doing a lot of post processing, you are best off with the TIFF. Do your editing and then save as a jpg for sharing and such.

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Old Jan 15, 2005, 3:17 PM   #3
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thezenone wrote:
Quote:
Hi, I just got a Panasonic FZ20 and I LOVE IT. I am a little confused on which format to shoot pictures in though. When I shoot in tiff it also creates a high quality jpeg. My question is: is this jpeg the same as the high quality jpeg setting that is a step below the tiff setting? The manual and website do not make clear if the jpeg it creates when it creates the tiff is of a higher quality than the jpeg setting (if that makes sense). I don't have a tripod so comparing the quality of the two is nearly impossible. I couldn't find anything in my searching so any help is appreciated.
I just tried it and I would say.....

No ..it is the compressed version about 1/2 the size of the high quality Jpg.
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 4:12 PM   #4
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I see. Thanks for the info. I didn't even think about checking the file sizes :sad: I guess I'll shoot in the high quality jpeg mode and only use tiff if I think I would want to post process the picture for some reason. I can't really tell a difference, but I wish I had known this the other day when I was shooting pictures. I shot in tiff mode and then erased the tiff's on my PC and kept the jpegs. Oh well. Thanks for the help.
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 4:37 PM   #5
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If you use tiff in the camera, it will eat your memory up considerably.

Use the highest jpeg in the camera. Then once you upload to your computer, if you want to do any editing, save them in uncompressed format first. Then you can edit to your heart's content. You can convert them back to jpeg later to conserve space.

I did a test a while back. I took the same shot in tiff & jped. I put them on the computer and zoomed in 1600x on the same detail on both pics.

The difference is so minute it's not even worth mentioning.

As jsiladi stated... The difference comes into play when compressed images are editied and then saved.

Hope this helps.

bobc
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 5:44 PM   #6
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Thanks again for all the help.
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Old Jan 31, 2005, 4:20 AM   #7
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Just another remark regarding loss of jpg quality due to editing.

You get into edit mode when rotating a vertical picture by 90 degrees. At least in PhotoBase sortware, which came with the camera.

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Old Jan 31, 2005, 5:21 AM   #8
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Foir rotating, use the Irfranview for lossless JPG transformation. There'll be no loss of quality, when you transform it - and this program is freeware...



I using JPEGCrops for adjusting to 3:2 format which is used in photo labs. This is lossless too.
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Old Jan 31, 2005, 12:53 PM   #9
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For lossless rotations...does Picasa 2 help. I already use it cause its an amazing program. It allows rotations and unlike all my other software, it does not warn me about photo degradation when I attempt to rotate. Anyone have an ideas?

thanks, Seth
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Old Jan 31, 2005, 12:59 PM   #10
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This is what I have seen with JPEG and TIF:

TIFF:
  • Big file size[/*]
  • Excellent quality [/*]
  • No color error in large colored areas (Such as sky, or big walls)[/*]
  • No any difference with JPEG in images with many things and colors.
[/*]
JPEG:
  • "small" file size[/*]
  • great quality in images with many things and colors[/*]
  • I get some airtfacts (it it well written? , artefactos in spanish) in large same color areas, but good enough quality still.
[/*]


I always use high quality JPEG, except when I want to digital process it.
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