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Old Jan 22, 2005, 1:23 PM   #1
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What is it that makes great pics?

Some people think it is knowing all the technical aspects of photography. You know... All the technical mumbo jumbo... The aperture... The shutter speed... The ultimate depth of feild... The lighting... The angle... The type of subject... and the list goes on. They think that if everything is not technically correct, that the image is worthless. And some of them have degree's, and know every technical term and formula known to the world of photography... Yet... Cannot get a shot right to save their lives.

Hmmm... Sounds like some electrical engineers that I've worked with... They could not even screw in a light bulb.

Some people think that it is the creative side that makes the shot. They think that if they just learn the basics of photography, then their creative flare will do the rest. Alittle touch here... A little tweek there... Change the color a little... Saturation... Contrast... You know... Spruce it up a little.

And yet their are some who claim to be artists, yet they can't even draw a stick person even with a ruler.

Ohhhhh.... I forgot.... It's the computer age.... Yeah... Thats right... We don't have to know how to be artists anymore.... Photo Shop will do it for us.

Some people think that it is a combination of both technical knowledge combined with creativity that makes the image. They think that if they learn enough of the technical stuff and combine it with a little creativity, they will get the perfect image. Get the framing right... Get the aperture and shutter speed correct... Get the right DOF & lighting... Then get the shot.

Then...

Open it in photo shop... Give it a little tweek here... And a little tweek there... And... Wella... The perfect image.

And yet... Some claim to know both, yet cannot screw in a light bulb or draw a stick person.

What about capturing the moment?

Could the perfect moment erase the need for technical knowlede and/or creativity?

What do "YOU ALL" think?

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Old Jan 22, 2005, 1:46 PM   #2
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Seems like we have gone down this road before, but here goes.

Photography is about all those things mentioned. The main tool is the box with a glass. The rest is just details. Some like to get into that and not even get close to what Fox's daughter Elizabeth has shown here on this forum. I don't think she has a real understanding of the technical aspects when she was taking those pictures.

Using post-processing ispart of the process for some to put the final touches on the raw data recorded. Itcan but not alwaysmake a difference in a marginal looking shot into something spectacular. Some cropping, USM and bit of contrast does make a difference in some shots. If so, then why not make it the best it can be? It is not a replacement for getting the best shot possible but sometimes time and/or circumstances won't allow another try. I would not just trash it because it did not come out of the camera perfect. Post-processing cannot make a bad shot look great. If it is not there to work with, it is not there. Like blown out highlights for example.

A balance of all things mentioned is entirely up to each individual on how they want to compose and take that picture. Some may get into heavy use of post-processing to get their own desired result. If it looks good, it looks good. Some shots are just good straight out others will need some tweaking. It is all up to the individual in what tools they want to use in making that picture happen.

There is nothing purist about digital photography. But that is just my opinion.
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 1:48 PM   #3
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I agree with you. But what you might add is the sport of photography.

Capturing the right moment, chasing the rare animals or rarely seen events is something that goes beyond composition and technical issues. This on itself makes a good pictures.

But.... on the other hand. If you don't know the story behind the picture, the picture must tell the story itself. And when that happends, we judge a photo by it's final look (post processed)

But when you get all the things right you mentioned, and this above. You could have a masterpiece

Post processing is a tool. Just as the digital zoom on the camera, and the image stabilizer.

agree ?
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 1:50 PM   #4
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Yes,

I agree with that Tim.
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 2:37 PM   #5
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I agree with Tim also. It's the sport of photography for me. I equate it with hunting. It's hunting with a camera instead of a gun.The enjoyment oftrying to get the shot that satisfys ME. If it looks decent right out of the camera, GREAT! If it's not to MY satisfaction I will use whatever tools and what little knowledge I have (and still trying to learn more as I go along) to make it satisfactory to ME.When the time comes that I get SPAZZZED OUT about the quality of my pictures then it's time to quit.
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 3:20 PM   #6
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The Lumix are point and shoot and if used correctly in easy lighting allow almost anyone to create great pic's.
It comes back to the persons vision, creativity and ability to compose the scene in the best way, so technical aspects are not as important.

The key is to learn to use the LUMIX correctly so it becomes an extension of ones self, this takes time and here the manual is important and lots of photoshoots.

And the ability to SEE the possibility of a great shot.

When lighting is difficult (we have seen topics in this form) Indoor concerts Churches .... the point and shoot can fail the camera needs to be set manually and here people falter.

Pro Photographers on the other hand can take a higher proportion of great shots than the non-pro, because of training.

HAving said that.. I think the artistic and creative side is much more important.

only grey area is post processing... still if the shot is great out of the camera then it can stand on its own without PhotoShop, some are not skilled in that area.
You can fiddle endlesly with PS, BUT out of the camera a great shot IS a great shot.

So I think the artistic and creative side are the most important for normal scenes and subject matter.

macros,closeups and special effect's are a more techie area so are not for everyone so my above comments don't apply.

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Old Jan 22, 2005, 3:36 PM   #7
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TimvdVelde wrote:
Quote:
Capturing the right moment,
agree ?
Yes absolutely

Cartier Bresson was a master at this.
http://www.afterimagegallery.com/bresson.htm
He used Leica M3's

Today digital = many options down the path perhaps to many get it right at the start.

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Old Jan 22, 2005, 3:37 PM   #8
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boyzo wrote:
Quote:
TimvdVelde wrote:
Quote:
Capturing the right moment,
agree ?
Yes absolutely

Cartier Bresson was a master at this.
http://www.afterimagegallery.com/bresson.htm
He used Leica M3's

Today digital = many options down the path perhaps to many get it right at the start.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv...on/gal_1-1.htm

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Old Jan 22, 2005, 4:19 PM   #9
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vIZnquest wrote:
Quote:
Photography is about all those things mentioned. The main tool is the box with a glass. The rest is just details. Some like to get into that and not even get close to what Fox's daughter Elizabeth has shown here on this forum. I don't think she has a real understanding of the technical aspects when she was taking those pictures.

You forgot to mention that Elizabeth is 12. Yes, the photos are every bit as good as, if not better, than some I've seen here and in other forums. Some taken with much more expensive cameras. She took the pictures of subjects that interested her and in doing so, as bobc says, captured the moment.

But the technical aspects of it are equally important. Our cameras have screens on them that we can view, in general, what the final picture is going to look like. If we don't like the result, having knowlage of how to correct the photo and take another, if possible, will go a long way.

Creatively, If we think about it, we are doing nothing more than capturing reflected light. The creation is already there. We've created nothing. That's not to say though we can't be creative in the presentation. We can have an idea of how we want to present the image. Figure out how to relate to a viewer what it was about the scene that made us want to record it. Tell a story with it. In those ways and many more I'm sure, we can be creative.

However, I find that the more I labor over those items, the more disappointed I am with the results. THE best photos I've ever taken, were purely accidental. Candid captures of a split second.

So, To me, What makes a great photo? It is a captured Candid moment. The look on a 2 year olds face when he's getting ready to sling his dinner plate across the room. The dog rolling his eyes at me as if to say .....

With all due respect, the sport of photography isn't what makes a great picture. The sport is what keeps you interested in taking the pictures.

my 2 cents

:roll:
Jeff
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 5:00 PM   #10
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I liken photography to being a Sushi chef. Nature provides the "raw fish"... in and of itself not very appealing. Photography takes that "raw fish", and through years of practice, turn it into a work of art. The world is our sushi plate.
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