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Old Jan 26, 2005, 6:40 PM   #11
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greenbaron wrote:
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Boyzo,

Does your FZ have exposure compensation? That way, you may still be able to get about the same light intensity over the different shots. Another option is to open them together, and adjust the levels for the different shots to make them match as much as possible.

You also need to take a lot of pictures, so your stitching program has a lot of 'blending surface'. I use an amazing piece of freeware called autostitch. Does the job very wel (get it at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~mbrown/autostitch/autostitch.html)
The below picture is build out of a darn lot of photos (35 :whack, without having the exposure locked. I overexposed the pictures nearby the rooflight manually, but if you have exp. compensation you should be able to do the same thing.



if pic doesn't work here's the link:

http://www.pbase.com/tvpopta/image/38025801

Cheerio! GB
Thanks GB in the main my panorams have worked out ok leaving the FZ1V2 to look after EV for the various shots so I may be worrying unduly...
Thanks muchly for help...
btw I use canon PhotoStitch its great came with my other camera but I use the lumix mostly the 12x zoom is irresistable LOL ;-)
Cheers
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Old Jan 26, 2005, 6:43 PM   #12
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greenbaron wrote:
Quote:
Boyzo,

Does your FZ have exposure compensation? That way, you may still be able to get about the same light intensity over the different shots. Another option is to open them together, and adjust the levels for the different shots to make them match as much as possible.

You also need to take a lot of pictures, so your stitching program has a lot of 'blending surface'. I use an amazing piece of freeware called autostitch. Does the job very wel (get it at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~mbrown/autostitch/autostitch.html)
The below picture is build out of a darn lot of photos (35 :whack, without having the exposure locked. I overexposed the pictures nearby the rooflight manually, but if you have exp. compensation you should be able to do the same thing.



if pic doesn't work here's the link:

http://www.pbase.com/tvpopta/image/38025801

Cheerio! GB
Had a look at your stitching 2 images
Damn good ;-)
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Old Jan 27, 2005, 4:21 AM   #13
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boyzo wrote:
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Ok I now want 4 panned shots of a wide scene the EV will vary because of the varying light but in fact I would prefer to keep it constant and expose for shadows.
It's a lot more work, but why not try bracketing the exposures for each shot? If there's an auto-bracketing facility on your camera it'd be quick & easy. You'd then have to choose the least ill-matched set of images to give to a panorama-stitching program.

One stage further would be to use an image editor to make composite images for each frame, with different exposures used for the sky (where mismatches will be painfully obvious) and for the foreground detail (where it often won't).

I had justyour problem in a big way before I even had a digicam, but when I did own a filmscanner. Unfortunately on my Scanwit filmscanner you couldn't turn off its auto-exposure. So although I'd carefully fixed the exposure on all my OM-10 SLR negatives, the filmscanner reduced me to your automatic exposure problem. With hours and hours of tweaking, mostly of sky tones, I eventually got a satisfactory result, as a huge digital image, which hung, framedover the fireplace in our village pub for a while during our millennium celebrations.

See http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/...skyline05.html

It took me weeks. A short trip to your camera store to buy a camera with manual exposure would be a lot quicker, (and cheaper if you value your time highly).

However, let's not forget that if the light changes siginificantly while you're trying to take a panorama, you're in trouble again. The sun does have this annoying habit of moving across the sky.

This thread will be of interest in the Panorama & Stitching forum here. Maybe I'll post a link to your question there.


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Old Jan 27, 2005, 10:59 AM   #14
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What program are you using to stitch the pano with? The one I am using has a feature that lets you select either/both to level the panoramic for color/brightness. Also lets you choose which photo to select these from. Also you can do multi rows for a really large resolution great for poster printing.

The program is a front end interface for Pano Tools call PT Assembler. Pano Tools is basically aPS pluginand difficult to use, the interface simplifies all the commands to a Windows type environment.
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Old Jan 27, 2005, 1:21 PM   #15
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jer1ivp wrote:
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What program are you using to stitch the pano with? The one I am using has a feature that lets you select either/both to level the panoramic for color/brightness. Also lets you choose which photo to select these from. Also you can do multi rows for a really large resolution great for poster printing.

The program is a front end interface for Pano Tools call PT Assembler. Pano Tools is basically a PS plugin and difficult to use, the interface simplifies all the commands to a Windows type environment.
I use the canon PhotoStitch program that came with my other camera a canon a40.
Its easy to use. I think it does some equalization of image contrast....
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Old Jan 27, 2005, 1:37 PM   #16
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Alan T wrote:
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boyzo wrote:
Quote:

Ok I now want 4 panned shots of a wide scene the EV will vary because of the varying light but in fact I would prefer to keep it constant and expose for shadows.
It's a lot more work, but why not try bracketing the exposures for each shot? If there's an auto-bracketing facility on your camera it'd be quick & easy. You'd then have to choose the least ill-matched set of images to give to a panorama-stitching program.

One stage further would be to use an image editor to make composite images for each frame, with different exposures used for the sky (where mismatches will be painfully obvious) and for the foreground detail (where it often won't).

I had just your problem in a big way before I even had a digicam, but when I did own a filmscanner. Unfortunately on my Scanwit filmscanner you couldn't turn off its auto-exposure. So although I'd carefully fixed the exposure on all my OM-10 SLR negatives, the filmscanner reduced me to your automatic exposure problem. With hours and hours of tweaking, mostly of sky tones, I eventually got a satisfactory result, as a huge digital image, which hung, framed over the fireplace in our village pub for a while during our millennium celebrations.

See http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/...skyline05.html

It took me weeks. A short trip to your camera store to buy a camera with manual exposure would be a lot quicker, (and cheaper if you value your time highly).

However, let's not forget that if the light changes siginificantly while you're trying to take a panorama, you're in trouble again. The sun does have this annoying habit of moving across the sky.

This thread will be of interest in the Panorama & Stitching forum here. Maybe I'll post a link to your question there.

Nice panoram. Alan



will look in panoram forum

thnks for advice
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Old Feb 2, 2005, 6:38 PM   #17
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Dear Members

I have seen great Panas'panos here.

Alan T, your skyline is nearly perfect, wasn't it for the clear sky. I know, hard to have all well exposed without bracketing and multiple images blending.

Boyzo:
I have had nice results with Canon's Photostitch (with my A300) but often had to clone on the blending lines.
I found that Panorama Maker (in FZ20 bundled CD) is quite better, also allowing 16 tiled pics panos, and vertical other than horizontal.

GreenBaron & Jer1ivp:
Great indoor panos: thought it was harder to achieve good results with close objects.
The garage one might have some distortion (not the fish-eye-like one, but the fact thet the two doors you mention as facing each others seem actually at 120° instead than 180°) but it's fine (although I am sure it is only a test/training for the serious outdoor stuff).

I also haveAutostitch, which is fine, although it only saves in JPG and has no manual setting as CONTROL points like Panorama maker has (in case a stitching is not successful). In some cases it did not outdo Arc Soft Panorama Maker 3.

PTAssembler/PanoTools is the king. Max made a great job.
Maybe it would have been better if it had a function which automatically inserted control points in case one does not want to do that manually. Just the opposite thing than Autostitch. But greatestresults and possibilities.
I hope the limited version after 30 days expir. is not so limited, but I don't think I'll be buying it beacuse I dont aim to stay whole days inserting control points and rendering giant images (even if the idea of moderately big panos, within 90-100Mp attracts me). Alsp I have not found out its PT Blending plugin.

Will post on this Panorama topic (both Horizontal and tiled) in the next weeks.

Francesco
http://digilander.libero.it/peribsen/indice.htm


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Old Feb 2, 2005, 7:37 PM   #18
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boyzo,

I think I understand what you are saying, and it makes sense to me. When I shoot birds, I use A mode to keep a good DOF and let the camera adjust the shutter speed to get a good exposure. The lighting changes depending on where the bird is, and I don't have time to adjust.

In your case you want to keep an even exposure for each shot to be stitched.

Right?

Nice shots by the way...

bobc
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Old Feb 3, 2005, 4:13 AM   #19
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bobc wrote:
Quote:
boyzo,

I think I understand what you are saying, and it makes sense to me. When I shoot birds, I use A mode to keep a good DOF and let the camera adjust the shutter speed to get a good exposure. The lighting changes depending on where the bird is, and I don't have time to adjust.

In your case you want tokeep an even exposure for each shot to be stitched.

Right?

Nice shots by the way...

bobc
Yes fixed exposure ... the FZ1v2 can't be locked like a manual film camera.
Funny tho' when I let the FZ1 take control it seem after stitching to be ok in the final panoram.
I may be worrying unduly ... what I am saying is perhaps if the FZ1 is left to it own devices iy does an adequate job.
I am new to panorams now that I have digital so any input help is nice thankyou.
I have done panorams with film slr's by joining the prints
way back.
I think panorams or tiled assemblies are fascinating

Glad you like my panorams Bob...

am still learning
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