Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 10, 2005, 11:55 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Raghu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Ambattur, near Chennai, India
Posts: 3,656
Default

See the sun dropping right between the palmira trees!
Attached Images
 
Raghu is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 10, 2005, 12:15 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Stoney79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 314
Default

That's unsharp...:roll:
Stoney79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 10, 2005, 3:47 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
indiawala's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 403
Default

The composition would have been great except that the shutter speed was too slow. In shutter priority if you would have used a faster speed...the trees and stuff would have been more of a silhouette and sharp and the sunset would have been classic...IMHO

seth
indiawala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 10, 2005, 3:52 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
TimvdVelde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 395
Default

I don't think the shutter speed is to slow... If you point at the moon at 2.8 you get like s 1/200. So when shooting the sun it will result in a 400+ shutterspeed (or higher aperature). This picture is just out of focus. And it's to bad because it would have been a nice one.
TimvdVelde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 10, 2005, 4:34 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Treemonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 628
Default

Hey Raghu is your FZ still alive?!!! I case people didn't know the lens acts as a magnifying glass (a very good one) and if you point it at the sun especially if you zoom in as well you seriously run the risk of frying your CCD or shutter/aperture blades.
Just a warning, don't try this at home folks!

Treemonkey
Treemonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 10, 2005, 6:05 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Stoney79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 314
Default

Treemonkey wrote:
Quote:
Hey Raghu is your FZ still alive?!!! I case people didn't know the lens acts as a magnifying glass (a very good one) and if you point it at the sun especially if you zoom in as well you seriously run the risk of frying your CCD or shutter/aperture blades.
Just a warning, don't try this at home folks!
I don't think there is any risk with sunsets (when you can even look into the sun). Of course I would be careful with the midday sun.
Stoney79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 10, 2005, 10:48 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Raghu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Ambattur, near Chennai, India
Posts: 3,656
Default

Thanks for all of you for your comments - I am new to photography and am continuously learning. I think my camera was on the point focus mode, and the centre pointed to the centre of the sun when clicking. Could that be a reason for the trees not getting focused? I will try again sometime soon.

Treemonkey - thanks for the warning, my camera is alive! However, you have instilleda sense of fear. I have to seek opinion on whether shooting the setting sun is safe for digicams.
Raghu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 11, 2005, 12:43 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Treemonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 628
Default

Found a link that may shine some light on the matter! Get it, shine some light on the matter. I crack my self up sometimes. Anyway it looks like I was over reacting, sunsets ok midday sun bad.



http://www.vrphotography.com/data/pa...ointatsun.html
and an exert from that page

Quote:
Q: If you point a camera at the sun, does it mess up the camera?

A: It depends on the camera and the situation, but as a rule of thumb, it's usually better not to -- at least toward a bright mid-day sun.

Many photographers take exquisite pictures of sunrises and sunsets, and these do virtually no harm to the camera since the light is far less bright than mid-day sun. Others use extremely dark filters (such as those found in welding goggles) to photograph the sun during solar eclipses.

However, the biggest reason to be careful when pointing a camera toward the sun is because the lens of the camera can actually act like a magnifying glass and focus the rays of the sun into a very small area on the shutter of the camera. If left in place long enough, this can burn a hole in the shutter or aperture mechanism of the lens itself. Remember doing this as a kid when you took a magnifying glass outside and burned holes in a leaf by focusing the sun on it? You're using the same principle when pointing a camera lens at a bright mid-day sun.

It's actually OK to point your camera toward the sun when you're taking a picture (this means you're using the sun as a back light in your pictures, which can yield quite dramatic results). Just don't keep it in the same position for a long period of time.

Also, with digital or video cameras that use electronic sensors, the direct sun can sometimes cause "blooming" problems where the sensor is overloaded and it won't record properly afterward. In newer cameras, this is only temporary. However, in some older cameras, it can cause permanent damage.

- Scott Highton
Treemonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:21 PM.