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Old Mar 2, 2005, 7:45 PM   #11
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I am also experiencing this same problem with my most of my sunrise and sunset photos.

Here is an example:


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Old Mar 2, 2005, 8:16 PM   #12
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it is flairing.....best thing to do is move the camera angle some and keep testing your shots till you get a few with out the flairing......
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Old Mar 2, 2005, 8:42 PM   #13
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Are you by chance using the Panasonic supplied adapter and a filter?? I'm kind of with Willow on this one..

Jeff
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Old Mar 2, 2005, 10:34 PM   #14
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jsiladi wrote:
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Are you by chance using the Panasonic supplied adapter and a filter?? I'm kind of with Willow on this one..

Jeff


I'd been using the supplied hood as I have filters that fit. When I shoot into the sun now, I take the filter off because of the reflection problem. I think maybe Willow is correct about the angle of the camera. Will try the next time we get some sun. Lol........Thanks for the input.......thekman.
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Old Mar 3, 2005, 2:21 AM   #15
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Interestingly enough, thekman, if you mess with the levels enough on your second photo you can still find the dots:

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Old Mar 3, 2005, 3:28 AM   #16
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Thanks for your feedback!
Of course I can return it, but first I had to be sure that this is a malfunction. As I was saying, I owned a much cheaper camera that doesn't have this "flare" effect, and I can tell you that's frustrating as I was expecting more quality for this money (quality otherwise visible in different conditions but sunsets).
This is what I saw watching again my tests: when the sun is "polarized" (behind a thin layer of clouds) this pattern isn't visible. Only when I take a shot of sun on a clear sky it is obvious. That's why image attached by nooner hasn't got any spots maybe...
I asked myself if an indoor shot of a light spot hasthe same effect. Well, the answer is no. I don't see any spots/ghosts around the light source.
Somehow I don't think that's lens flare: usually they form as concentric circles around the sun, and they aredisposed on a certain direction (not a rectangle) as you change the shooting angle. In this case they are disposed on that pattern, which resemble indeed with sensor's shape.

tb1, can you please post more shots with the sun on a clear sky, and without any filters? I think your camera acts as normal as I expected. This will be very helpful. Thanks a lot!
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Old Mar 3, 2005, 6:29 AM   #17
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catalin wrote:
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tb1, can you please post more shots with the sun on a clear sky, and without any filters? I think your camera acts as normal as I expected. This will be very helpful. Thanks a lot!
These were taken on a moving boat, no hood, no filter. I took about 10 shots trying various settings. They all pretty much look like the shot I previously posted-f/8. No cases of the red spot pattern but I did manage what I would call a lens flare on one attached below. This was at f/5.6.
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Old Mar 3, 2005, 6:53 AM   #18
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Thanks tb1 ! This looks like normal acceptable lens flare.
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Old Mar 4, 2005, 3:20 AM   #19
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Some nice images here... I was thinking back to my video experiences on this subject, and it seems to me there are two inter-related issues:

1) Sensor bloom. This is when so much light hits [areas of] the sensor that electrical signal generated in sensor photosites is so high that those pixels' signals spill over into neighboring photosites. It's like an overflow. The adjoining microlenses pick that up and THOSE pixel values are then affected, changed, maybe in overshot too. Severe blooming, electrical interference for entire regions of the sensor is the result. I actually ended up with a couple shots that had a discernable crosshatched GRID in them when I was experimenting with shooting into the high sun.

In this case or for sunsets, smallest possible aperture speed may help, graduated/ND filters - and polarizing filters (and that great lense hood) too since stray light could be contributing. This still doesn't always address the dynamic range issue of some scenes, between absolute brightest and areas that are dark...

2) Lense flare. The lens itself may contribute to these problems, and interact. Interior reflections within a lense - between its elements and groups - cause any hotspot to cascade, much like guitar distortion at high volumes with feedback a disctinct possibility. You can get some wild effects with that, which of course are nicer yet sometimes if some control is exerted.

There, you can often move the camera a couple of degrees on either the vertical or horizontal plane or both and get an acceptable shot. I haven't always been able to tell in the LCD or viewfinder till AFTER capture which versions are acceptable and which went TOO crazy. It seems like when the conditions become chaotic enough that the displays may also be wigging out and on a slower refresh, not necessarily the same light presentation as the slight moment later when the shutter actually gets tripped.

Seems like even dust motes in the air can sometimes get in on the act.
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Old Mar 4, 2005, 3:38 AM   #20
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I'm beginning to think it is how the angle of the camera lens is pointed at the sun. Most of the times this occurs, it seems I've pointed the lens directly at the sun. I looked at a few pictures where the sun was in the photo, but not in the centre of the picture, and just normal lens flare may occur. Probably this "spot" phenomina is happening because of an overloading of light to the sensor. Just my uneducated theory. But like I said, I'll try some different angles etc when I get out and take some sunset pictures in the near future and will post the results. Cheers........thekman.
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