Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Panasonic / Leica

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 4, 2005, 4:33 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
pianoplayer88key's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 405
Default

here's some sunshots I took a couple weeks ago with my S1 IS. 38mm, F/8.0, 1/2000", iso50, approx 3pm. Top is with the camera lens itself, bottom is with a PL filter. (IMHO they're still about 8 stops overexposed.)

I would like to be able to get noontime cloudless-day shots of the sun with a dull reddish-orange color. What do I need to do to achieve this? (btw I didn't go tele on the example shots but I would have liked to almost fill the frame with a sun that, if spot-metered, would have been underexposed by like 2 to 4 stops.)
Attached Images
 
pianoplayer88key is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 2005, 5:25 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Alan T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 2,980
Default

Everyone here needs to realise just how intense is the radiation from the sun. It's nothing like any other photograph, unless you're keen on arc lamps,arc welding,and the like. Astronomers project it into the bottom of a cardboard box as a big (and therefore relatively dim) image if they want a decent picture.

Everything else we photograph reflects just a bit of sunlight back at us. The sun *is* pure undiluted sunlight and it'll creep around the corners of iris diaphragms, reflect off black non-reflective surfaces, and still register all sorts of spurious bits & pieces ona sensor.

So just turn the exposure right down, and hope for the best.

Goodluck,

Alan T
Alan T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 2005, 6:34 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
pianoplayer88key's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 405
Default

I'm already limited at F/8.0, 1/2000", ISO 50.

I probably could get a decent shot if I could have used F/91, 1/10000", ISO 12. I wonder what my results would have been like then?
pianoplayer88key is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 2005, 9:23 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Alan T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 2,980
Default

pianoplayer88key wrote:
Quote:
I'm already limited at F/8.0, 1/2000", ISO 50.

I probably could get a decent shot if I could have used F/91, 1/10000", ISO 12. I wonder what my results would have been like then?
style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #f8f8f8"
When I went to Alsace on the Franco-German border in 1999 for the total solar eclipse, I made filters out of bits of old floppy disk, and they worked brilliantly. It gives a nice red tinge as well. Just a thought.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #f8f8f8"See http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=28359&forum_id=85&highli ght=eclipse

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #f8f8f8"
Alan T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 4, 2005, 1:31 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
pianoplayer88key's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 405
Default

nice solar eclipse shots.

I'll have to dig up some I took a few months ago with my S1 IS of a total lunar eclipse and post one of those.

Here it is. 32x digital zoom, cropped in PS, don't remember exif info.

I'd try for a near-sunset shot, but I'll have to do it from somewhere else - there are some significantly-sized hills west of me that prevent me from seeing a good sunset. I hope to try for a few shots with my S1 IS in a couple weeks when I'll be within 1/2 mile or so of the Pacific and should have a fairly clear shot.

I took some shots of the sun during the major fires a year and a half ago in southern calif (the sun was dark red then and I could actually almost UNDERexpose it a LOT), but I took them with a Canon A70 or A80 so they don't fill much of the frame. )
Attached Images
 
pianoplayer88key is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 8, 2005, 2:27 PM   #26
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Default

I finally had the opportunity to make some more tests. This time the sun wasn't so bright, so I could vary aperture from f8.0 to f2.8 at the same light.
I don't think it's a lens flare. My conclusion is that those red spots come from a diaphragm problem.
Judge yourself:
f8.0 - 1/200sec. - 48.4mm
Attached Images
 
catalin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 8, 2005, 2:29 PM   #27
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Default

f5.6 - 1/400sec. - 48.4mm
Attached Images
 
catalin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 8, 2005, 2:30 PM   #28
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8
Default

...and surprise: no spots. Nothing but a nice haze behind branches at:
f2.8 - 1/1000sec. - 48.4mm
Attached Images
 
catalin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 8, 2005, 5:45 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
HarjTT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,535
Default

Catalin

Thanks for that tip - I'd tested my Fz10 doing by trying to similar shot and it did the same thing...red spots exactly like the ones posted.



Harj
HarjTT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 8, 2005, 6:08 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
jsiladi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 587
Default

catalin wrote:
Quote:
...and surprise: no spots. Nothing but a nice haze behind branches at:
f2.8 - 1/1000sec. - 48.4mm
I know with some of my older film cameras that have a pentagon shaped aperture opening, a star effect will sometimes appear, one point for each corner in the aperture when pointed directly into bright light.. Are you saying that's what is going on here?? I had originally thought that if using the stock adapter and filters, some stray light may be bouncing around inside causing the spots..

Jeff
jsiladi is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:16 PM.