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Old Apr 3, 2005, 8:10 PM   #1
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Hi Everyone,

I copied several images (jpg & tif format) taken with my camera on earliar days from hard drive to a Flash Card using Camedia software and a card reader. When I check in Windows Explorer, I can see that the pictures were indeed transfered. I can open each of them by dubbel clicking on their respective file names.

On the other hand, after inserting said flash card back into my Olympus C-5060 cam, I get the message "No Picture" on the LCD screen.

Further more, in Windows Explorer can be seen:

"Removable Disk (J)\DCIM\100OLYMP", where (J) is indeed said Flash Card.

What's the meaning of the 2 subfolders DCIM & 100OLYMP????

My goal for the transfering of the images: to view them on a 24" Flat TV screen.

Any help on this matter would be very much appreciated.

Regards and thanks in advance.
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Old Apr 3, 2005, 9:06 PM   #2
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Panasonic files names will not be recognized by Olympus and vice versa. Rename the image files to correspond to the viewing camera's format.
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Old Apr 3, 2005, 9:20 PM   #3
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Hi,

Thanks for your quick response. It made me aware of the fact that I posted my question in the wrong forum. So I transfered said question to the "Olympus" forum just now. Regards
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