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Old Apr 8, 2005, 2:28 AM   #1
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Hi gang, I was hoping you could help me out a bit.:?:
I have just received my RAYNOX 250 macro lens:G
Are there any tips anyone can offer before I start blazing away?
I currently don't have an external flash, is this a problem?
Any Do and Dont's will be appreciated
:G
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Old Apr 8, 2005, 2:36 AM   #2
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Hi,

I have received a few PM's regarding this question so I have send my tips via a PM. Hope the info helps.

Treemonkey
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Old Apr 8, 2005, 2:52 AM   #3
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Hi Treemonkey

Could you send me your tips as well!!



Steve




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Old Apr 8, 2005, 6:26 AM   #4
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Treemonkey wrote:
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Hi,

I have received a few PM's regarding this question so I have send my tips via a PM. Hope the info helps.

Treemonkey
How about posting the text here so we can All share in the wisdom??

:?:
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Old Apr 8, 2005, 8:18 AM   #5
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HI,

more that happy to offer some advice. the raynox is a great lens which is very powerful. This can be good as you can have some truly amazing magnifications but the drawback is a complete lack of depth of field (DOF), even at f8 you are looking at <1mm DOF. This makes focusing relatively difficult. macros taken with this lens, especially when taken at full zoom tend to look very abstract and often just dont look right. You can of course back off the zoom and down to ~6x there will be no vignetting. I tend to use my Nikon 6T when doing wildlife macros and then use the raynox when I want to have a bit more fun and try something a little different. It is a good lens and quite cheap but it is difficult to use in the field.
If you are going to get the lens then you will almost certainly need an external flash. I have the sunpak 383 and have a simple bounce setup on it which seems to work very well. I also suggest getting a rubber eye cup for the EVF as this will make focusing easier.
In terms of tips:
1- use "A" mode with f8 ALWAYS
2- manual focus as auto focus will not work with the limited DOF
3- Focus by using manual mode and move the camera back and forward until it is in focus.
4- start off at a lower zoom, dont get put off if you dont master full zoom straight away.
5- light - you need plenty get an external flash and use a diffuser or a bounce setup.
6- have fun take plenty of photos and just play with settings.

Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions

i also have a couple of web sites with some of my photos so if you want to have a look feel free.

http://www.macrophotography.blogspot.com/



Hope this helps

Simon


This is some info I wrote up a while ago, it isnt complete and it is only some general things I have learnt.
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Old Apr 8, 2005, 9:52 AM   #6
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How about using a tripod with a tilting center pole? I am thinking of getting such a tripod like the Gitzo Explorer G2220.

Thanks,
Steven
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Old Apr 8, 2005, 6:46 PM   #7
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I have never used a tripod for macro photos, as I have mentioned before I think they simply get in the way and with insect macros you often dont have the time to set up a tripod. Just my 2c worth.

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Old Apr 8, 2005, 7:10 PM   #8
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Treemonkey wrote:
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I have never used a tripod for macro photos, as I have mentioned before I think they simply get in the way and with insect macros you often dont have the time to set up a tripod. Just my 2c worth.
I didn't use one either. But I'm thinking of getting a mini tripod, because sometimes it's very hard to hold the camera steady enough, especially when the light issuboptimal.

Iwouldn't use a flash because I've heard that insects can go blind by theflashlight.
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Old Apr 8, 2005, 7:28 PM   #9
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Stoney79 wrote:
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I wouldn't use a flash because I've heard that insects can go blind by the flashlight.
I think someone may be pulling your leg. Maybe if you have the flash on max and point it directly at the little critter, but I always use a very low output and always bounced. I certainly haven't noticed any bugs walking or flying into walls after I took a photo of them!

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Old Apr 8, 2005, 7:52 PM   #10
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Treemonkey wrote:
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HI,


i also have a couple of web sites with some of my photos so if you want to have a look feel free.

http://www.macrophotography.blogspot.com/



Hope this helps

Simon


This is some info I wrote up a while ago, it isnt complete and it is only some general things I have learnt.
Thanks for the help..

Jeff
:G
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